Blog Posts

Common Costs of Owning a Dog

If you are new to puppy ownership, you might not know how much pets actually cost. Man’s best friend has to eat, sleep, and go to the doctor, just like you - and that costs money. You shouldn’t be caught off guard with a pet that you can’t afford, so we’ve put together this helpful guide so you can make an informed decision before adopting a puppy. The Overall Cost of Owning a Dog To own a dog, you’ll have to pay a one-time adoption fee and then pay recurring expenses. Adoption fees can range from $50 to $400 for a mutt at a shelter, or $1,000 to $4,000+ for a purebred puppy from a reputable breeder. The rarer the breed, the higher the fee. According to Synchrony, the average annual cost of owning a dog is between $1,270 and $2,803. Over a 15-year lifespan, that’s $19,893 to $55,132. Those expenses include food, healthcare, toys, supplies, and cleaning products. The Cost of Feeding a Dog Your dog needs to be fed twice a day, or four times as a puppy, and the cost of kibble can add up over a year. Expect to pay around $434 to $684 each year for dog food. This doesn’t include the occasional bone, just their daily meals. The cost of food differs based on the size of your dog; small dogs weighing 13 lbs only need 1 ⅓ cup of food but larger dogs weighing 75 lbs need 4 ¼ cups of food. You’ll also be spending more money if your dog needs prescription dog food due to a medical condition. Health-Related Expenses of Dogs As your dog progresses through different stages in its life, you’ll have different health-related expenses to pay. The average cost of medical expenses is between $534 and $1,285. This includes vet visits, vaccinations, and other medications. When they are puppies and in their senior years, you can expect to pay more than when your dogs are fully grown and middle-aged. The Cost of Treats, Toys, & Grooming For the other miscellaneous items and services that aren’t necessary but are nice to have for your dog, you can expect to pay between $231 to $551 each year. This includes dog bones and other treats, tennis balls, chew toys and other toys, dog beds, and grooming services. If you’d like to save a little bit of money on grooming, adopt a breed that doesn’t require grooming, or learn how to groom your pup yourself - it’s a great bonding experience! How Much It Costs to Clean Up After Your Dog If you’ve owned a pet before, you know that they can be a mess sometimes. Before they are housebroken, they’ll have accidents on the floor. Even when they’re older, you’ll have fur and drool on your floor and furniture that needs regular cleaning (depending on the breed - some breeds don’t shed). The average cost to clean up after your pooch is between $70 and $283. Adopt a New Best Friend Today So, now that you’re prepared with the knowledge of how much it costs to own a dog, are you ready to adopt? Consider adopting from a reputable breeder on Lancaster Puppies. We provide you with helpful information on every breed, like size and amount of shedding, so you can get an even better understanding of how much it will cost to feed and clean up after your new dog.

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Feb 20, 2024

Dachshunds: The Playful Weiner Dog

Dachshunds, affectionately known as Weiner Dogs, have an iconic appearance and a playful personality for families who love to have fun with their pets. The Dachshund’s History As you might have gathered from their Germanic name, Dachshunds originated from Germany in the 16th century. Doxies have ancestors that go as far back as ancient Egypt, however. They were developed originally as hunting companions during fox or badger hunts - their name literally translates to “badger dog”. Over time, three coat variations arose - long, wirehaired, or smooth. Today, they do well as lap dogs or hunting companions; flexible for any family! Dachshund Characteristics Appearance and Coat Dachshunds are instantly recognizable with their short, stubby legs and elongated bodies. Their muzzles are long and they always have droopy ears. Their coats come in three varieties, long, wirehaired, or smooth, and come in a variety of shades, like red, black, chocolate, white, or gray. Temperament All Dachshunds are loyal companions that are a bit stubborn at times but still have playful attitudes. Their temperament varies a little by their coats. Long-haired Doxies are calm and quiet, while their wire-haired counterparts are a bit mischievous. Smoothcoated Dachshunds are a good middle ground between the two temperaments. Health Because of the elongated body, weiner dogs are at a higher risk of developing spinal injuries. You should also be on the lookout for obesity, hip dysplasia, eye conditions, seizures, and patellar luxation. If you adopt from a reputable breeder with health screenings, however, you’ll reduce your risk of these conditions. Caring for a Dachshund A Doxie’s Ideal Home Dachshunds do well in most homes, with or without children, so long as their owners can accommodate their exercise needs. They need to run around the yard or at least go on a walk twice a day because of their hunting energy. They do well in multi-dog households and can make for a good watchdog to alert you of intruders. Training Best Practices Dachshunds are very intelligent and can learn tricks, but they are stubborn when learning them. They are very affectionate with family, so the best way to train them is with positive reinforcement. They won’t react much to harsh commands or punishments. Persistence is key, but end a training session if they start getting distracted by other animals or noises. Exercise Needs It’s important to exercise Dachshunds twice daily because of their elongated back. Exercise will strengthen their back muscles, which will prevent spinal injuries. Do not let them run up and down stairs or jump on or off furniture, as this can hurt their spines. Grooming & Hygiene The amount of grooming you’ll need for your Dachshund depends on its coat. Smooth coats only need the occasional bath and wipe-down with a towel. Wirehaired Doxies need to be plucked and hand-stripped every couple of months. Longhaired pups will need to be brushed daily to avoid tangles. Does the Dachshund sound like the right fit for your family? Adopt one today from a reputable breeder on Lancaster Puppies!

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Feb 20, 2024

Pomskies: High-Spirited Sidekicks

Pomskies are one of the most popular designer breeds and are a cross between a Siberian Husky and a Pomeranian. Their intelligent and playful natures make them a blast to have around the home, and they make great family companions.  Pomsky History Tracking the history of designer breeds is usually complicated, but it is assumed that the first litter of Pomsky puppies appeared around 2009. The first officially recorded litter was born in 2012, and Pomskies quickly became one of the most popular designer breeds out there. Today, Pomskies remain an incredibly popular designer breed throughout America and Europe, and breeders are required to follow strict guidelines during the breeding process.  Pomsky Characteristics Appearance and Coat Pomskies are small to medium-sized dogs, depending on the size of their parents. They typically measure from 10-15 inches tall and range from 20-35 lbs. They have dense double coats that vary widely in colors, including white, fawn, black, brown, gray, and pied. They usually adopt the adorable face of the Pomeranian, and their ears are fluffy and stick straight up.  Temperament Pomskies are playful, intelligent, and have a distinct sense of humor. Both parent breeds are vocal, so you should expect your Pomsky to voice their opinions as well. They are very loving with their families and often develop an even stronger bond with one person. Early socialization is important with both people and other furry friends, as they have a tendency to get nervous around new faces. They love getting praise from their owners, so positive reinforcement is essential during the training process. Their playful nature makes them a great option for active families looking for a loyal companion. Health Pomskies are typically healthy and live long, happy lives, but they can be genetically predisposed to some health conditions. These conditions include allergies, eye problems, and patellar luxation. Also, they should be monitored when living in warmer climates due to their thick coats.  Caring for a Pomsky A Pomsky’s Ideal Home Pomskies can excel in almost any home as long as they get enough exercise to stay happy and healthy. Their vocal nature can create problems if they are living in an apartment, but with training, this can be minimalized. A fenced-in yard with plenty of space to run is ideal, but with daily exercise and training, Pomskies can excel anywhere.  Training Best Practices Pomskies are not easy to train, and have a tendency to be stubborn, energetic, and easily distracted. The training process should be started as early as possible to curb these behaviors and develop good habits. They love receiving praise from their owners, so positive reinforcement should be used during the training process.  Exercise Needs Pomskies inherit a lot of energy from their Husky parent and require an above-average amount of exercise to stay happy and healthy. Daily walks are essential, and any physical activity that involves playing or training is encouraged. Giving them time to run free in a fenced-in yard is also a great way to get out their energy and let them play.  Grooming & Hygiene Pomskies require regular grooming, especially if they inherit the Pomeranian’s coat. They should be brushed daily with a wire pin brush to remove dead hair, and a slicker brush to prevent knotting and tangling. They only need occasional baths when they get especially dirty; over-bathing can dry out their skin. Their hairy ears can trap in dirt and should be cleaned regularly to avoid infection. Have you decided that the Pomsky is the breed for you? Browse Pomsky Puppies today!

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Jan 25, 2024

How to Clean a Dog Kennel

Keeping dog kennels clean is important for the continued health, comfort, and happiness of your dogs. Any type of dog shelter should always be clean and safe, no matter how frequently or infrequently your dogs are in this space. Dirty dog kennels can easily spread disease, leading to sick dogs and expensive vet bills. Keep reading to learn how to clean dog kennels. The Importance of Clean Kennels Your dog deserves to have a kennel that is clean and comfortable. Additionally, you don’t want to be tracking dog waste throughout your kennel and house. To prevent contagious diseases, parasites, and bacteria from spreading among your dogs, each dog should be assigned its own kennel. If you move dogs around to different kennels, each kennel must always be thoroughly cleaned before a new dog moves in. Even if a dog is rarely in its kennel, any urine or feces inside a dog’s shelter must be cleaned immediately to prevent bacteria growth. Urine and feces should never remain in a kennel for days. When a soiled kennel is not cleaned, it can spread bacteria and illness throughout your kennel. How Often Should Kennels Be Cleaned? You should inspect each kennel daily to make sure all are clean. Any spilled food or water should be cleaned up and the dishes refilled. If any kennels contain feces or urine, they need to be sanitized. Some accidents may just need spot-cleaning while others may need to be deep cleaned. Hard, solid waste can be spot cleaned while liquid or soft waste may require cleaning the entire kennel floor. Items inside kennels, like toys, bedding, and dishes, should be cleaned weekly. All dog kennels should be deep cleaned at least once a month, regardless if the kennel looks dirty or not. Deep Cleaning Kennels Empty the Kennel The first step in cleaning a dog kennel is relocating the dog to a safe spot away from the kennel. Once the dog is safely moved elsewhere, begin taking out any items in the kennel like dishes, toys, and bedding. These items need to be removed and washed separately so all corners and floor space in the kennel can be cleaned properly. Likewise, check if any bedding inside the kennel is soiled or dirty. If a dog is sick and its bedding has been heavily soiled, it’s best to throw it away and get fresh bedding. Lastly, use a scoop to remove any solid trash, such as feces or spilled dog food. Rinse & Scrub Next, rinse down the kennel with a hose. Apply your selected disinfectant on the floor and walls. Make sure you follow the product’s cleaning instructions as some cleaners need to be diluted or will need time to sit and disinfect. After disinfectant has been applied and any instructed time has passed, begin scrubbing the kennel walls and floor with a hard-bristled broom or brush. Final Rinse & Air Dry Once the kennel has been scrubbed, rinse everything down with a hose again, using hot water if available. Leftover cleaning agents in your dogs’ kennels can make them sick if ingested, so you want to take your time fully rinsing the kennel out. After all the soap has been completely rinsed away, the kennel can be left to air dry. To prevent further bacteria growth, dog enclosures must be fully dry before the dog is let back in. To speed along drying, you can use a squeegee and/or clean towels. Choosing a Cleaner There are endless products on the market that can be used to clean and disinfect kennels. While there are many cleaners to choose from, it’s best to avoid those that contain ammonia. The smell of ammonia is similar to the smell of dog urine, which can lead dogs to use their kennels as bathrooms. As mentioned earlier, always follow the instructions on your cleaning product. Keep in mind that a product’s dilution amount may be different when disinfecting for an illness as opposed to routine cleaning. A popular cleaner and deodorizer that’s used by vets and pet owners across the US is Rescue Disinfectant. This cleaner is known to be safe for animals while combining cleaner, disinfectant, and deodorizer into 1 product. Personal Safety When cleaning kennels and dog shelters, remember to keep the space well-ventilated and wear gloves when necessary. In addition to gloves, waterproof boots and shoe coverings are recommended when cleaning. These items prevent bacteria from being spread to your home or other dogs. This is especially essential when illnesses are present. Have a litter to sell? Looking for a new puppy to bring home? Begin browsing or listing puppies on Lancaster Puppies by creating an account today. Check out our blog for more dog care tips and training guides.

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Jan 25, 2024

Tips on How to Care for Elderly Dogs

As your beloved family pet gets older, he’ll start showing signs of aging, just like all of us. Caring for elderly dogs is much different than when they were puppies. Dogs are considered “senior” at around 10-12 years of age. Once they hit that age, there are different health conditions to watch out for, food to feed them, and exercise routines. Read on to learn how to care for your puppy when they’re no longer a puppy. What Can Happen to an Aging Dog? As dogs get older, their bodies start to deteriorate just like us humans. That means they could experience poor eyesight or hearing, sore joints, and weight gain. They’re also more susceptible to diseases, like cancer, heart disease, liver disease, kidney disease, and hypothyroidism. Certain breeds might be more susceptible to conditions specific to that breed as they age. You ought to review the facts about your breed so you know what to look for as they age. To stay on top of any changes to your dog’s health over time, it’s imperative that you schedule regular check-ups with your vet. Veterinarians are aware of potential problems with senior dogs and will monitor your dog’s health over time. Early detection is key to helping your dog with medicines and/or surgeries so that they can live out the rest of their golden years in comfort. Special Food for Senior Dogs Senior dogs need additional nutrients to stay healthy and moving, so it’s best to change their diet in their senior years. No single diet works for every dog because each dog’s health risks are different. Your veterinarian can help you find the right food. In general, though, here are some changes to your aging dog’s diet that most dog owners will want to follow. You’ll want to increase protein intake to prevent muscle decay. Incorporating omega-3 fatty acids can help with joints and the immune system. To prevent weight gain, decreasing their overall calorie intake is another good tip to follow. How to Exercise Older Dogs Aging dogs cannot exercise as rigorously as energetic puppies, nevertheless, they still need to receive regular exercise. Rather than going for an hour-long walk each day, break it down into shorter intervals - perhaps four 15-minute walks throughout the day. As dogs age, they also need more consistency in their daily schedule, so spontaneous hikes at your state park might be more harmful than beneficial. Establish a walking schedule and stick to it. Since they won’t have as many engaging adventures outdoors, you should invest in some toys that will stimulate their mind indoors without draining too much energy. There are several toys made for senior dogs which you can find online. Find a Lifelong Friend on Lancaster Puppies Are you looking for a new pet which you can care for from their puppy years to their senior years? Check out the listings on Lancaster Puppies. You’re sure to find the perfect puppy for you to enjoy throughout all stages of its life.

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Jan 10, 2024

Breed Spotlight: Australian Cattle Dog

The Australian Cattle Dog is a very intelligent and energetic breed that loves going on adventures with its owner. These dogs develop strong bonds with their owners and make great family pets with early socialization and training. Australian Cattle Dog History Australian Cattle Dogs are descendants of British Cattle Dog breeds brought to Australia during the British settlement in the 1800s. The dogs the British brought with them, a breed known as the Smithfield, had trouble dealing with the high temperatures, rough terrain, and long distances between settlements. British stockmen quickly began developing a breed that could deal with these hardships by breeding Smithfields with the feral Dingo and other herding breeds. A man named George Elliot bred Dingoes with Collies and sold puppies to farmers. This combination was close, but it wasn’t until these early Australian Cattle Dogs were bred with Dalmatians that we got the Australian Cattle Dog we see today.  Australian Cattle Dog Characteristics Appearance and Coat Australian Cattle Dogs are medium-sized, compact dogs that usually weigh around 35 pounds. They are muscular, strong, and agile, traits needed to herd and avoid running cattle. They have thick undercoats and short, weather-resistant top coats. Their coats are usually blue or red and can be mottled or speckled with black or tan markings.  Temperament With the proper training, the Australian Cattle Dog is a loyal family breed. They are extremely intelligent and independent by nature, so proper training is essential to curbing that independent behavior. They grow strong attachments to their owners and don’t like being left alone for extended periods of time. They are naturally suspicious of new people and make great guard dogs. They can be great with children but have a tendency to try to herd them, proper training can stop this. They love to exercise, especially if there is a job or game associated with the exercise.  Health Australian Cattle Dogs are a hardy breed and are typically very healthy. Despite that, there are some health concerns owners should be aware of. They may be prone to deafness, OCD, progressive retinal atrophy, and hip dysplasia.  Caring for an Australian Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog’s Ideal Home Australian Cattle Dogs do best when they have plenty of room to run and exercise, so a rural home with a fenced-in yard is ideal. That being said, Australian Cattle Dogs can still thrive in urban environments as long as they get the proper amount of exercise.  Training Best Practices The Australian Cattle Dog is a very intelligent breed that requires early training to reach its full potential. They do well with positive reinforcement, so be sure to have plenty of treats on hand. They train well when they are given clear objectives and jobs to complete due to their cattle-dog nature.  Exercise Needs Australian Shepherd Dogs are extremely energetic and need lots of exercise every day to stay happy and healthy. If you don’t exercise more than a daily walk, the Australian Shepherd Dog may not be the breed for you. They love accompanying their owners on runs, and participating in dog sports is a great way to get their minds and bodies moving.  Grooming & Hygiene  The Australian Cattle Dog was bred to be out in the elements, so its coat requires very little maintenance to stay healthy. A brushing every few weeks should do the trick, and a little more often during the heavier shedding seasons. Their nails should be clipped regularly, and their ears should be checked and cleaned regularly to prevent ear infections.  Do you think the Australian Cattle Dog is the right breed for your family? Browse Australian Cattle Dog puppies today!  

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Dec 15, 2023

Tips for Traveling with Your Dog

Going on a vacation is a great way to unwind from the day-to-day stress of work. If you’re a dog owner, you might want to take your pooch along with you to make the trip even more enjoyable. You might not know what you need to do to bring them along, though. So, we’ve created this guide to help you bring your dog on vacation with you! Pack Supplies Calculate how much dog food you need to bring to feed your pooch every day you’ll be away and don’t forget their food bowl, too! You’ll also need to bring a water bowl and if you’re planning on having lots of outdoor adventures, there are plenty of travel-specific water bowls to choose from. Pack some of your dog’s favorite toys and a dog bed to keep them calm and happy in this new environment. You might also want a travel crate to prevent them from getting into trouble while you’re away from the hotel or rental home. Have Accurate Identification It’s very important to have accurate identification on your dog’s collar in case they get lost. Include your pet’s name, your name, phone number, and proof of rabies vaccination. If your dog doesn’t already have a microchip, get this as well. It might be a good idea to bring a second collar and I.D. as well, in case the first one’s lost on an adventure. Finally, you should bring a photograph of your dog to distribute if they’re lost. Go to a Vet Check-Up Before traveling, you’ll want to make sure your dog is in good health. Schedule a check-up with your veterinarian and explain what you’re planning to do on this trip. Your vet can provide guidance for your trip and explain if there are any potential problems that could arise. When you’re at the vet, grab copies of their health records to bring with you, too. Lastly, you should look up veterinary hospitals near your destination in case an emergency arises. Take Your Pooch on a Test Drive If you’re not sure how your dog will respond to an extended car ride, go for a test drive. Drive around for an hour or two before returning home and see how your dog reacts. Some dogs get anxious on long drives and ending a drive at a strange location can further increase their anxiety. If they don’t do well on long drives, you might need to go for a few test drives to get them used to the car before taking them on vacation. Book Dog-Friendly Hotels Not all hotels and house rentals allow for pets. Before booking any accommodations, give them a call or research their website for their rules on pets. If you need some help, there are websites where you can easily look up dog-friendly hotels at your destination. Schedule Dog-Friendly Activities Being in a new environment, you shouldn’t leave your dogs alone for extended periods of time. That’s why you need to schedule dog-friendly activities for your vacation. Going out to dinner on your own should be fine, but they shouldn’t be alone for more than an hour or two. Many outdoor activities will be dog-friendly but many indoor activities will not. To help you, those same websites that help you book hotels also list dog-friendly activities at your destination. Tips for Flying with Dogs Flying to your destination with your dog has many more hoops to jump through than driving, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible. First, you need to verify that your dog is healthy enough to fly. Your veterinarian can help with this and ensure that your dog has all of the required vaccinations to fly. They can also prescribe tranquilizers to sedate your dog during the flight if needed. Next, you should check the U.S. DoT pet guidelines to make sure you’re following all of the legal regulations. Then, you should check with the airline you are considering flying with. They can place additional restrictions on how you can travel with your dog. Make your reservations early, as the number of animals permitted on flights is limited and accepted on a first-come, first-served basis! Adopt a New Vacation Buddy Today! Looking for a furry friend to accompany you on vacations? Look no further than Lancaster Puppies! There are thousands of breeders with hundreds of purebred and designer breed puppies available to adopt. Browse the available puppies today!

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Dec 08, 2023

When Is It Too Cold For Dogs to Be Outside?

As days become shorter and temperatures drop you may find yourself wondering, “How cold is too cold for my dog?” Just as the risk of heatstroke is prominent in the summertime, winter brings along threats of frostbite and hypothermia. While we may think dogs can stay warm on their own because of their fur, this isn’t the case for many breeds. Keep reading to learn more about your dog’s tolerance for low temperatures, signs your pup is too cold, and how to go on walks in the winter. It Depends on the Dog There are many factors that largely contribute to a dog’s overall tolerance for cold weather and winter temperatures. Among these factors are a dog’s breed, size, build, coat length, coat type, age, and health. Breed & Build Breed and build have important roles in a dog’s ability to endure cold temperatures. Some breeds thrive in the winter while others are better suited for the summertime. Throughout history, various types of dogs have been bred for cold climates. Today, these dogs love spending time in the snow and excel as winter sports companions or snow rescue dogs. A few breeds most famous for their love of winter are: Siberian Huskies Bernese Mountain Dogs Newfoundlands Alaskan Malamutes Samoyeds Great Pyrenees Saint Bernards Dogs with thin builds or small bodies will have much lower tolerances for cold temperatures than large, hardy breeds. Winter weather poses a great threat for thin, small dogs as many are not built for it and cannot insulate themselves against the cold. A few examples of these breeds include: Chihuahuas Greyhounds Boston Terriers Yorkies Whippets Dachshunds Coat Type A dog’s coat type plays an obvious part in its tolerance against cold weather. Dogs with thick double coats do best in the cold while short-haired breeds struggle the most with winter temperatures. Dogs with short fur have a harder time keeping themselves warm and protected from the cold. Along with fur being a factor in a dog’s ability to withstand low temperatures, a dog’s colors have an impact as well. Because they absorb more sunlight, dogs with darker fur colors, like brown or black, will stay warmer on cold, sunny days. In contrast, dogs with light or white fur will not absorb much heat from the sun. Age & Health Even if your dog is a breed that does well in cold temperatures, its age and health can make being outdoors in the winter dangerous. Dogs with short-term or long-term health conditions are more susceptible to discomfort and injury from cold temperatures. No matter the breed or coat type, if a dog is underweight or sick, their tolerance for the cold will drop drastically. For example, dogs with diabetes, kidney issues, cancer, arthritis, and other conditions will need short walks with plenty of protection against the cold to stay safe. Wintery weather and cold temperatures don’t just affect dogs with existing conditions, they can also weaken the immune systems in healthy dogs, leading to sickness. Even dogs bred for cold climates will be more susceptible to injury or sickness if they have existing health issues. Likewise, elderly dogs of all breeds and sizes will have reduced resistance against the cold and can have trouble staying warm. It’s not uncommon for elderly dogs and dogs with health conditions to need additional warmth from sweaters and coats even when inside. Freezing Temperatures Although there are always exceptions, dogs of all breeds and sizes are usually okay in winter temperatures above 45 degrees Fahrenheit. However, once temperatures go below 45 degrees Fahrenheit, it becomes unsafe for short-haired dogs to be outside for extended periods of time.  While all dogs will have different thresholds for the cold depending on their sizes and breeds, avoid letting any dog outside for a long time when the temperature is at or below 20 degrees Fahrenheit. Once outside temperatures drop this low, there’s an increased chance your dog could get frostbite or hypothermia. It’s also important to be aware that temperature alone isn’t the only dangerous part of winter weather. Wind, rain, and snow can greatly add to the already damp and cold conditions. Signs Your Dog is Too Cold When taking your dog outside in the wintertime, there are multiple signs that will let you know if your dog is too cold. These signs include: Shaking & shivering Keeping 1 or more paws off the ground Looking for warm places to shelter Whining & crying Anxious or upset behavior Curling or hunching up Tucked tail Ultimately, our dogs will let us know when they are experiencing discomfort or pain. It’s up to us to pay attention to our dog’s condition and take immediate action when they show signs of distress. Symptoms of Hypothermia & Frostbite Similar to humans, dogs can develop hypothermia and frostbite when they spend lots of time outdoors in freezing conditions. Canine hypothermia and frostbite are serious health issues that can have the following symptoms: Lethargy Confusion Pale or discolored skin Severe shivering that stops as hypothermia progresses Fast breathing & heart rate Dilated pupils Stiffness Swelling Blisters Pain when touched If you notice these signs after your dog has been outside you should immediately take it to a warm area, wrap it in warm towels and/or blankets, and contact your veterinarian. Taking Your Dog on Winter Walks In the wintertime, walks should be kept short to limit your dog’s exposure to the elements and low temperatures. If you’re able, avoid walking your dog early in the morning or later in the evening. Choose a time of day when the sun is bright and temperatures are warmer to take your dog outside. If you are unable to walk your dog earlier in the day, use a reflective coat, harness, or collar on your dog so it can be seen by cars and pedestrians. To help your dog release energy and get exercise on freezing winter days, keep them active with mentally and physically stimulating indoor games. A good rule to remember when taking your dog out for walks or potty breaks in the winter is if you are too cold to be outside, so are they. Protect Your Dog Against De-Icing Chemicals Part of being a dog owner is making sure your pup’s paws are injury-free during the winter. Keep your dog’s paw pads trimmed to prevent icicles from forming on wet fur. Likewise, use a warm, damp cloth to wipe off your dog’s paws after winter walks. This will remove any de-icer substances used on driveways, roads, and sidewalks that can cause chemical burns and make your dog sick if licked. For these reasons, you should also avoid letting your dog eat snow that is near roads and sidewalks as they may contain anti-icing chemicals. You can best protect your dog’s paws in the winter by providing boots or shoes for them to wear outside. These items are reusable and will protect your dog’s paws against the harmful effects of ice, sidewalk salt, and various forms of de-icers. Are you a pet parent? Get more information and tips on dogs through Lancaster Puppies’ blog. Looking to add a puppy to your home this winter? Find puppies for sale near you or take our quiz to find out which dog breed is right for you.

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Nov 28, 2023

Breed Spotlight: Yorkshire Terrier

The Yorkshire Terrier is a tiny and spunky breed that makes a loveable pet. They are intelligent and easy to train. With their hypoallergenic coat, they do great in the homes of people with allergies. Read on to learn more about this great breed and see if it’s right for you! Yorkshire Terrier History Yorkies were developed in Yorkshire, England during the Industrial Revolution, hence their name. They were used as rat catchers for the factories that were built during this time period. The breed used to be a bit bigger but was bred down to their modern toy size because they could get into rat nests more easily. As pest control became more sophisticated, the Yorkshire Terrier quickly transitioned to being a lap dog of upper-class families and it still makes a wonderful lap dog today. Yorkie Characteristics Appearance & Coat Yorkshire Terriers are tiny dogs, only weighing 3-8 lbs, with triangular, upright ears. Yorkies’ coats are silky and fine while being hypoallergenic, making them a very attractive breed. Their coat can be styled in a variety of different appearances, depending on how they’re trimmed. Some might have floor-length hair while others have shorter cut coats. Yorkshire Terriers come with their backs as blue or black, and their chest and legs as tan or gold. Temperament Yorkshire Terriers make outstanding companions who love attention but don't do well if left alone for extended periods of time. Yorkies can have a range of personalities. Some are cuddly and laid-back, while others are bold and mischievous. Yorkies are intelligent and learn quickly, making them easy to train. They respond best to positive praise and food rewards. These dogs are naturally suspicious of strangers and other pets, so early socialization is very important. While some Yorkies bark a lot, they can easily be trained not to. Health Yorkies can hurt themselves and break bones from jumping down or falling because they are a small breed. Additionally, Yorkshire Terriers may be prone to dental issues, eye issues, patellar luxation, tracheal collapse, bladder stones, hypoglycemia, Legg-Perthes disease, and pancreatitis. Responsible breeders will screen their dames and sires for these conditions before breeding them. Check with your breeder for vet records. Caring for a Yorkshire Terrier Yorkie’s Ideal Home Yorkshire Terriers are highly adaptable to any home, doing well in an apartment or on a ranch. One thing they do need, however, is an attentive family. Yorkies are very affectionate and shouldn’t be left alone for long periods of time. Training Best Practices Yorkies are very intelligent and train easily with a dominant master. They can be a little feisty but experienced owners will easily train them to remain calm and not bark with positive reinforcement. They are loveable, so they will respond very well to praise and affection when they do something right. Exercise Needs Yorkies are higher energy and should be taken on a walk twice a day. If they aren’t exercised, they’ll build up energy and start finding ways to entertain themselves. If you want to do something other than a walk, they’ll love playing fetch or learning agility tricks thanks to their working dog ancestry. Grooming & Hygiene Because Yorkies don’t shed, they need a little more grooming than most dogs. Daily brushing will keep their coats untangled. Depending on how long you like to keep the coat, your pup will need more or less frequent trimming. Floor-length fur will need to be trimmed more often to keep it clean than short-cropped fur. Adopt a Yorkie Today So, does the Yorkshire Terrier sound like the ideal breed for your family? Browse the selection of Yorkies available from breeders on Lancaster Puppies and find your perfect match! Register an account to get started.

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Nov 20, 2023

The Importance of Socialization for Puppies

Socializing a puppy means exposing them to people, other animals, and different places. This process ideally takes place between 3-12 weeks old, so it starts with the breeders and becomes the owner’s responsibility once they’re adopted around 8 weeks old. Although it can be time-consuming, socialization is a vital part of raising a puppy during those early first months. Learn why it’s so important and how to do it. Why Puppy Socialization is Important Socializing your puppy is important because it affects their temperament for the rest of their life. It helps dogs be calm and well-behaved around other pets while meeting new people, or exploring new places. When you take your dog to the groomer or groom their coat at home, they are more likely to stay calm. Even at the vet, you’ll find socialized pups take their shots better than unsocialized dogs. Perhaps most importantly, your dog will be less prone to aggression, which could get you in legal trouble if they chase after the mailman! How to Socialize Your Puppies What Breeders Should Start With Socialization among puppies should begin right after their eyes open and they start to mingle around the whelping box on their own, around 3 weeks old. As a breeder, you should get your litter vaccinated and give them their first round of dewormer before socialization begins. About a week after those shots, you can start exposing them to new things. Bring new toys to them. Have friends and family play with them. You could even bring other well-socialized animals for play dates. Finally, you can slowly expand your whelping area to allow them to explore more of your house. The key is to keep a close eye on your puppies and make sure they aren’t overwhelmed by new experiences. What Owners Should Continue With Once you adopt a puppy from a breeder, you must continue the socializing work begun by the breeder. Continue the same tactics that they started above, exposing your dog to other pets, people, and spaces in your home. Try to do 2-3 socialization activities outside the home every week, as well. This can include walks in a park, puppy playdates, or exploring a pet store. Again, the key here is to keep an eye on your puppy to see if they get overwhelmed and cut your excursion short if they do. Lastly, you could sign your puppy up for socialization & training classes, such as the AKC S.T.A.R. program. Connecting Reputable Breeders and Buyers on Lancaster Puppies Are you a reputable breeder who properly socializes your puppies before selling them? Consider registering for a seller account on Lancaster Puppies. We make it easy for you to list an entire litter online in one easy process. If you’re a buyer looking to adopt a well-socialized puppy, consider adopting from one of the reputable breeders on Lancaster Puppies. There are thousands of breeders across the country following the best practices outlined in this blog. Register a buyer account today and start searching for your new furry companion.

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Nov 20, 2023

Announcing Our 2023 Christmas Giveaway!

This Christmas we’re giving back to the community with $5,000 in prizes from December 1st to December 12th! Each day, we’ll have new prizes and multiple winners will be randomly selected. You can increase your chance of winning one of these 12 prizes by completing actions for extra entries. How to Enter the Giveaway Quickly enter in just 2 easy steps: Go to our giveaway page Complete at least 1 action to enter the giveaway and various opportunities to earn extra entries. No purchase is necessary to enter the giveaway. Enter to Win Prizes You Can Win Date Prize Description Link 12/1 Large Wall Clock 24-Inch Wall Clock - Oversized Centurion Roman Numeral Style Modern Wall Clocks (Black) View on Amazon 12/2 Apple AirPods Apple AirPods (2nd Generation) Wireless Earbuds with Lightning Charging Case Included. View on Amazon 12/3 Shark Cordless Handheld Vacuum Shark Cordless Handheld Vacuum UltraCyclone Pet Pro Plus, with XL Dust Cup, in Black View on Amazon 12/4 Bogg Tote Bag BOGG BAG Original X Large Waterproof Washable Tip Proof Durable Open Tote Bag View on Amazon 12/5 Block Knife Set CUISINART Block Knife Set, 15pc Cutlery Knife Set with Steel Blades for Precise Cutting, Lightweight, Stainless Steel, Durable & Dishwasher Safe View on Amazon 12/6 Panini Press 10 in 1 Panini Press Sandwich Maker, Taylor Swoden 1600W Electric Indoor Grill with Non-Stick Double Sided Plates, LED Touch Screen, Independent Temperature Control, Opens 180 Degrees, Stainless Steel View on Amazon 12/7 Greenworks Power Tool Set Greenworks 24V Brushless Cordless Drill Impact Driver Combo kit, 1/2”Drill & 1/4”Hex Impact Driver Power Tool Kit, Included 2 Batteries, 1 Charger, 8 pcs Bit Set & Bag View on Amazon 12/8 Kids Electric Scooter Aero iSporter Electric Scooter for Kids Ages 6-12 (mainly 8-12), with Kick-Start and Gravity Sensor, Kids Electric Scooter with LED Lights, 2 Speeds View on Amazon 12/9 3 Piece Patio Set Piece Outdoor Bistro Set Patio Set Balcony Furniture Outdoor Furniture Rattan Chair Conversation Sets with Side Table View on Amazon 12/10 40” HP Smart TV 40-inch D-Series Full HD 1080p Smart TV with AMD FreeSync, Apple AirPlay and Chromecast Built-in, Alexa Compatibility, D40f-J09, 2022 Model View on Amazon 12/11 Espresso Machine Espresso Machine, Latte & Cappuccino Maker- 10 pc All-In-One Espresso Maker with Milk Steamer (Incl: Coffee Bean Grinder, 2 Cappuccino & 2 Espresso Cups, Spoon/Tamper, Portafilter w/ Single & Double Shot Filter Baskets) View on Amazon 12/12 Recliner Chair with Massage and Heat Large Power Lift Recliner Chairs with Massage and Heat Breathable Faux Leather Electric Lift Chairs for Elderly, Heavy Duty Big Man Recliners Power Reclining Chair with USB Port (Nut Brown) View on Amazon The giveaway is open to all U.S. states. Please note, shipping is unavailable to Alaska and Hawaii. If your prize cannot be shipped to you, you will receive an Amazon gift card for the prize’s retail value. If a product goes out of stock, those winners will be notified and given alternatives to choose from. Lancaster Puppies is not liable for any damages or shipping delays. Disclaimer: This giveaway is in no way sponsored, endorsed, associated with, or administered by Facebook/Instagram. By entering, entrants confirm they are at least 13+ years of age and release Facebook/Instagram of any responsibility. No purchase is necessary to enter. FAQs How will I know if I won? Winners will be drawn from December 1st to December 12th. Lancaster Puppies will contact winners within 24 hours by email to notify them that they’ve won. Winners will have 24 hours to claim their prize or another winner will be drawn. Once confirmed, winners will be announced on the giveaway page, Lancaster Puppies' Facebook, and Lancaster Puppies' Instagram. Do I have to enter the giveaway every day? No, when you submit an entry you’ll be entered to win each prize. What if I’m already signed up for the newsletter? If you’re already subscribed to our newsletter, we’ll have your email in our system. All you have to do is go to the giveaway page and click on the entry for email subscriptions. What if I don’t have a social media account needed for an extra entry? You don’t need to complete all tasks to be entered into the giveaway. If you wish to earn extra entries, you can set up a social media account to enter. Can I win multiple prizes? In order to have multiple winners each participant will only be eligible to win 1 prize. Special Thanks to Our Sponsors Consumer Safety Group protects transactions online between pet buyers and approved breeders for safe and secure purchases. Plain Direct is an online marketplace that sells new and pre-owned homesteading goods, supplies, and equipment. Alaska Adventure Books is a 12-book series about the traveling Snader family. These books give you an inside scoop on their travels and how they settled in Alaska. The series touches on the many missions stationed across the state and gives you a look into the hearts and minds of the people who call Alaska home. At Buckeye Puppies, we connect people with puppies by advertising puppies for local breeders and pet shops in Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan. We provide puppy buyers with a convenient, direct way to contact puppy sellers in their area.

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Nov 17, 2023

New Website Incoming!

Lancaster Puppies is happy to announce that we are launching our new website design on November 6th! With this enhanced design, you’ll find it easier to navigate, find puppies in your area, and list your litters for adoption. Check out some of the features you can look forward to! We’ll Be Heading Into a Freeze Before we take a look at the new features of this design, we wanted to let you know of an upcoming account freeze. In order to safely and securely transfer your account information, including the active listings of sellers, we’ll be freezing all account access from the evening of Friday, November 3rd  to November 6th. But don’t worry, you can still browse all of the available puppies during this time. Now, onto the exciting new features! New Features for Buyers In-Depth Breed Guides Not sure what breed is right for your family? Our new breed guides will help you! For each dog breed on Lancaster Puppies, you’ll find the following information: breed history, size, lifespan, energy level, coat and appearance, shedding level, dog group, nicknames, temperament, activity level, health, and grooming requirements. All of these factors help you understand if a dog will fit your lifestyle. If it’s a match, you only need to scroll down to see all of our active listing of that breed! Easily Find Sellers If you’ve adopted puppies from a seller in the past that you’d like to adopt from again, or if you’ve received a recommendation from a friend, you can now search for specific sellers. Each seller on our new website will have a profile page where you can see all the puppies they have listed for sale, as well as their hours of operation and contact information. You can leave reviews about your experience with these sellers, too! Improved Search The new and improved search on Lancaster Puppies will load results almost instantaneously! Our search filters will also include extra information, like family-friendly, hypoallergenic, apartment-friendly, and more! These new filters are in addition to our already existing filters of age, size, gender, breed, color, state, registration, and price. You’ll be sure to find the right puppy for you, even if you’re unsure of the breed you’d like! More Detailed Puppy Listings Our new puppy ad listings provide you with more information to make a big decision a little easier for you. See puppy details, contact breeders, view breeder profiles, browse listing photos and videos, and view similar breeds all from one page. If you’re not ready to buy right now, you can favorite a puppy listing to save it for later. New Features for Sellers More Photos and Videos Available for Listings You now have the option to add more photos and even videos to listings, which will help you increase your sales. The new Premium ad tier allows for up to 25 images and 3 videos and you can even upload images of the puppy’s dam and sire. The videos help to illustrate your puppy’s personality, helping customers to find their perfect match before visiting the pups in person. You can also edit your images within the seller dashboard! List a Litter All At Once When your dam delivers a litter, you can create multiple ads without typing in the litter info multiple times, saving you time! We now have the option to go through one process to add all the puppies in the litter. You start by entering shared information, such as the dam, sire, and their birthday. Then, you can add the specific information for each puppy in the litter, like their name and sex. Now, you instantly have multiple puppy ads with the click of one button! As a bonus, they'll connect to each other, so when a buyer falls in love with a puppy that is no longer available, they can easily purchase a brother or sister. Enhanced Seller Dashboard Our enhanced seller dashboard will improve your experience with an easier to navigate interface. Review and reply to all of your messages right from the seller dashboard. See performance statistics for all of your ads, including your number of live ads, your unread messages, the number of views your ads receive, and more! Managing your ads has never been easier with this new dashboard. Search and find the ad you’re looking to edit instantly. No more endless scrolling! Like we mentioned above, you can also create multiple ads at once with our multi-puppy listing. All of your contacts are also in one place where you can instantly search up the specific contact you’d like to edit. Just another new tool to help you manage your profile!

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Nov 05, 2023

Best Hiking Trails for Dogs in IN

Dog-friendly hiking trails are an excellent way to exercise your puppy while exercising yourself. Your puppy gets to enjoy all the smells found on the trail and you get to enjoy being surrounded by nature. Not all hiking trails welcome dogs and many that do restrict dogs to on-leash hiking. Before taking your dog on a hike, be sure to check the park rules to understand what you can and cannot do with your pup. If you are new to Indiana or recently adopted a new puppy, here are our picks for the best hiking trails for dogs in the Hoosier State. Holliday Park Located At: 6363 Spring Mill Rd, Indianapolis, IN, US, 46260 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Holliday Park is one of Indianapolis’s oldest parks and features 3.5 miles of picturesque trails to hike with your pups. It’s a great place to embrace nature and go bird-watching without needing to leave the city. The park is managed by the Holliday Park Foundation, a nonprofit organization that hosts events throughout the year. Consider donating or volunteering your time. Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park Located At: 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis, IN, US, 46208 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook   The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park is a 100-acre sculpture and natural park with woods, wetlands, and meadows to hike through with your dogs. The park is regularly adding new sculptures and other art installations, so keep coming back to see the new installations! The park is maintained by Newfields, a nonprofit organization that connects art with nature. Consider donating to help out. Falls of the Ohio State Park Located At: 201 W Riverside Dr, Clarksville, IN, US, 47129 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Nestled along the Ohio River is the Falls of the Ohio State Park. You can see Devonian-age fossil beds and the historic George Rogers Clark home site along your walk through the park. More than 230 species of flowering plants are also found across the park’s two unique habitats. The park is maintained by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources and the Falls of the Ohio Foundation, a nonprofit organization. Monon Rail Trail Located At: 1430 E 96th St, Indianapolis, IN, US, 46240 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Monon Rail Trail is over 20 miles of refurbished rail lines from Sheridan to downtown Indianapolis. Along the length of the trail, you’ll encounter many charming bridges and parks, including the Indiana State Fairgrounds. The Monon Rail Trail is jointly managed by several organizations but the largest stretch (over 10 miles) is managed by Indy Greenways, a nonprofit community organization dedicated to the upkeep of trails around Indianapolis. Consider volunteering to help preserve the trails. Hummel Park Located At: 1500 S Center St, Plainfield, IN, US, 46168 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Hummel Park is a great place to take your leashed dogs on a walk. There are several footpaths in the park but we recommend the Blue Heron Path, which guides you along White Lick Creek, away from the sports fields, and around Blue Heron Lake. Hummel Park is managed by the Guilford Township Park Administrator. Brown County State Park Located At: 1405 S.R. 46 W, Nashville, IN, US Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Brown County State Park features 12 trails of varying difficulty, so dogs and owners of all ages can find trails that work for them. Among the trails, you’ll encounter all types of topography, from flat woodlands to deep ravines, and several man-made structures, like bridges and retaining walls to help access other areas of the park. The park is maintained by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources.  Rum Village Park Located At: 2626 S Gertrude St, South Bend, IN, US, 46614 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Rum Village Park is 160 acres of natural woodland with 3 miles of walking trails throughout, where you can walk your pups on a leash. After going on your hike, you can take them over to the Rum Village Dog Park to let them run around off the leash. The park is maintained by the City of South Bend Venues, Parks, & Arts (VPA) Department. Ox Bow Park Located At: 23033 County Road 45, Goshen, IN, US, 46528 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Ox Bow Park is a wonderful place to spend all day with your family, including the pups! You’ll hike across creeks, through wetlands and woodlands. In the heart of the park, you’ll come across the Ox Bow Tower, a panoramic viewing tower where you can see the whole park. Ox Bow Park is managed by the Elkhart County Parks Department. Clegg Memorial Garden Located At: 1782 N 400 E, Lafayette, IN, US, 47905 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Clegg Memorial Garden is a nature preserve where you’ll encounter four unique ecosystems along your hike. Some of the trails are rather rugged but they’ve installed steps on any particularly steep inclines. The Clegg Memorial Garden is maintained by the NICHES Land Trust, a nonprofit organization dedicated to collaborating with other nonprofits to conserve natural areas. Consider volunteering or donating to help. National Road Heritage Trail Located At: 960 National Rd Heritage Trl, Terre Haute, IN, US, 47809 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The National Road Heritage Trail is a 6.5-mile paved trail ideal for dog owners with disabilities to hike. The trail runs along the old route of the National Road, the first-ever federally funded road commissioned in 1806 to aid in westward expansion. It’s registered as a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. The trail is maintained by the City of Terre Haute Parks Department. Celery Bog Nature Area Located At: 1620 Lindberg Road, West Lafayette, IN, US, 47906 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Celery Bog Nature Area contains 4.3 miles of paved trails and 2.5 miles of natural paths through the woods, savanna, and prairie. The bog is considered one of the best places in Indiana to bird watch. Celery Bog is maintained by the West Lafayette Parks & Recreation. Rivergreenway Located At: Fort Wayne, IN, US, 46807 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Rivergreenway in Fort Wayne is 26 miles of pathway along all three rivers in Fort Wayne, the St. Marys, St. Joseph, and Maumee Rivers. There are many scenic vistas to enjoy along the trail. The Rivergreenway is jointly maintained by the Fort Wayne Parks and Recreation Department and the New Haven/Adams Township Parks & Recreation Department. Muscatatuck Park Located At: 325 IN-3, North Vernon, IN, US, 47265 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Muscatatuck Park contains almost 10 miles of mixed-use trails where you can hike with your dogs. There are also 2.5 miles of paved paths for visitors with disabilities. Along the trails, you’ll find an early pioneer grist mill called Tunnel Mill. Muscatatuck Park is maintained by the Jennings County Parks and Recreation. Cool Creek Park Located At: 2000 E 151st St, Carmel, IN, US, 46033 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Cool Creek Park is a great park that hosts many events throughout the year. They also happen to have over 4 miles of wooded trails to hike with your leashed puppy. The park is maintained by the Hamilton County Parks and Recreation. Nickel Plate Trail Located At: 1286 W Summit Dr, Kokomo, IN, US, 46901 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Nickel Plate Trail is a rail trail corridor running over 40 miles from Kokomo to Rochester. The entire length is flat and paved, making it an easy hike for people with disabilities. The trail is maintained by volunteers with the nonprofit Nickel Plate Trail, Inc. and funded by donations. Consider supporting them with your time or by donating. Clear Creek Trail Located At: 899 W Church Ln, Bloomington, IN 47403 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Clear Creek Trail in Bloomington was designed as a “linear park” along 2.4 miles of Clear Creek. Along the trail, you’ll encounter a restored, 1887 wrought-iron bridge. The trail also joins with the Bloomington Rail Trail, if you want to keep hiking. The Clear Creek Trail is maintained by the City of Bloomington Parks & Recreation. Ritchey Woods Nature Preserve Located At: 10410 Hague Rd, Fishers, IN, US, 46038 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Ritchey Woods Nature Preserve features nine beautiful nature trails totaling 2.25 miles of dog-friendly paths. The nature preserve is a great place to observe wildlife, so be sure to leash your pup so it doesn’t run after a squirrel. The Ritchey Woods Nature Preserve is maintained by the Fishers Parks Department. St. Patrick's County Park Located At: 50651 Laurel Rd, South Bend, IN, US, 46637 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook North of South Bend is St. Patrick’s County Park, which features 6 miles of trails where you can walk your dog on a leash. You’ll have the opportunity to hike along St. Joseph River and go bird-watching, as the park is listed on the Indiana Birding Trail. The park is maintained by St. Joseph County Parks. Brincka Cross Gardens Located At: 425 E Furness Rd, Michigan City, IN, US, 46360 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Brincka Cross Gardens began as an art project by a professor at the Art Institute of Chicago and was acquired by Porter County after his passing. You’ll notice the artistic landscaping as you walk through the four acres of gardens with hundreds of varieties of flowers to enjoy. The Brincka Cross Gardens is maintained by the Porter County Parks and Recreation. Indiana Dunes National Park Located At: 376 N County Line Rd, Gary, IN, US, 46403 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Indiana Dunes National Park stretches across 15 miles of coastline along Lake Michigan and features over 50 miles of trails! Along the trails, you will find shifting sand dunes, quiet woodlands, sunny prairies, and lush wetlands. Most trails, but not every trail, are dog-friendly and you must keep your pup leashed. Be sure to grab a map to plan out your hike along the many dog trails. Indiana Dunes is maintained by the National Park Service. Jasper Riverwalk Located At: Cemetery Dr, Jasper, IN, US, 47546 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Jasper Riverwalk is a 2.1-mile paved trail along the Patoka River in Jasper. Take your pup on its leash along the walkway and enjoy the river view. The park also offers amenities, like a boat launch, playground, horseshoe pits, and shelters to spend all day there with the family. The Jasper Riverwalk is maintained by the Jasper Park & Recreation Department.

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Nov 05, 2023

Breed Spotlight: Rat Terrier

Rat Terriers are named after their skill at hunting rodents on 19th-century farms. They now make playful family companions who are easy to train. They’ll make a great pet for a family in almost any environment. Read on to learn if this is the right breed for you! Breed History There are many rat-catching breeds developed over hundreds of years of history, but the Rat Terrier’s origins start in the late 19th century. They were developed by mixing many fast breeds together until the breed standard was defined in the early 20th century. Their speed and size helped them to control the vermin population on farms, which threatened crops. With the invention of pesticides, Rat Terriers weren’t needed and their population declined. Some breed enthusiasts kept it alive, though, and they still make affectionate family pets today. Rat Terrier Characteristics Appearance & Coat Rat Terriers are found in two sizes, standard and miniature, both of which are muscular and athletic. They have short, smooth, and shiny coats that come in a variety of colors and markings, including white, black, tan, chocolate, and others. Their ears remain erect and their tails are typically docked. Temperament Rat Terriers are playful and intelligent companions who require early socialization. They respond well to training and their affectionate nature has made them increasingly popular as therapy dogs. Health Rat Terriers are overall a very hardy breed that could live for 16-19 years. They could, however, develop some conditions, such as patellar luxation, cardiac abnormalities, pancreatic issues, hip dysplasia, and Legg–Calvé–Perthes syndrome. It’s recommended that you get your pup tested for all of these conditions. Caring for a Rat Terrier The Rat Terrier’s Ideal Home The Rat Terrier was originally bred on farms and still does well in those environments, but it’s an adaptable breed. Rat Terriers will do well in any home, including apartments, so long as they are given a creative outlet. Get some toys that will stimulate their intelligence and curiosity. Training Best Practices Rat Terriers respond very well to positive reinforcement in training. They aim to please and were originally bred as farm dogs, meaning they can pick up on a lot of tasks. It’s important to start training early and socialize them with other pups to prevent mischievous behavior, however. Exercise Needs Rat Terriers have a moderate energy level that can be satisfied with daily walks and playing inside. They were developed with speed in mind, so a fenced-in yard that allows them to run free will do wonders, but is not necessary. Consider taking them to the dog park every so often instead. Grooming & Hygiene The Rat Terrier’s glossy coat doesn’t shed too much and only needs a weekly brush to keep it shiny. You may need to brush more often during the spring and fall shedding seasons. A monthly bath will usually be enough to keep the dog smell away but you may need to bathe more often if they get dirty outside. Does the Rat Terrier sound like the perfect fit for your family’s lifestyle? Find Rat Terrier puppies for sale near you and adopt one today!

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Nov 05, 2023

Preventing & Treating Kennel Cough

All dog owners know about the dreaded kennel cough, a canine illness that’s similar to the common cold for humans. Although this sickness is easily spread among dogs, it’s a common issue that has known preventions and treatments. Keep reading to learn more about this condition and how you can keep your dog safe from it. What is Kennel Cough? Kennel cough is a condition brought on by an infection or bacteria that causes a dog’s trachea and bronchi to become inflamed. This condition is highly contagious among dogs so vaccination and separation are key defenses. Kennel cough can be spread through the air as well as through direct contact with the saliva or mucus from a sick dog. Because it spreads so easily, infected dogs must be quarantined away from their litters or kennels. How to Prevent Kennel Cough Kennel cough can be prevented by vaccinating your dogs against the illness. This is especially important if your dog spends a lot of time in heavily populated canine spaces such as kennels, doggy daycares, obedience classes, and dog parks. In addition to vaccinating your dog against kennel cough, only board your dog at reputable kennels that require proof of vaccination. You should also keep your dog from playing with other dogs that are sick or showing signs of illness. Likewise, if you notice symptoms of kennel cough in your dog, quarantine them at home while they recover to prevent the disease from spreading. Kennel Cough Symptoms   As seen in its name, one of the main symptoms of kennel cough is a dry, honking cough. However, signs of infection can also include the following symptoms: Gagging White foam-like substance from mouth Runny nose Mucus discharge from eyes Decline in energy Decreased appetite Mild fever Once symptoms are noticed, you should immediately move your dog to a comfortable area that is away from other dogs in your home or kennel. Kennel Cough Treatment If your dog begins showing signs of kennel cough, you should take it to a veterinarian as soon as possible for an examination. Usually, vets can diagnose your dog with a simple exam that doesn’t involve extensive testing. Antibiotics and anti-inflammatories may then be prescribed to help your dog recover. Kennel cough cases tend to be mild and generally go away after 2 or 3 weeks. However, it can last 4 to 6 weeks depending on the severity of the infection. While kennel cough may be described as mild, the fast-spreading nature of the disease requires immediate response to reduce the risk of other dogs getting sick. Additionally, prompt veterinary examination is vital in ruling out any dangerous conditions that share similar symptoms, like distemper and the canine flu. If your dog’s condition doesn’t get better or continues to worsen, see your veterinarian for further evaluation. Making an appointment with your vet is important to prevent your dog’s case of kennel cough from leading to pneumonia, which can be deadly.   Caring for a Dog with Kennel Cough In addition to prescribed antibiotics, your dog can get relief from a humidifier or 10-minute sessions exposed to steam from a hot shower. That being said, be careful not to overdo steam sessions with flat-faced dog breeds to avoid further breathing problems. Be aware that coughing fits can be triggered in a dog through drinking, having its lower throat touched, or becoming excited. Using a harness instead of a collar can help minimize coughing fits as a harness won’t put pressure on your dog’s throat. If your dog’s appetite has decreased, you can encourage them to eat by microwaving their food for 5 seconds. This will enhance the smell of your dog’s food, which in turn can increase their appetite. Likewise, mixing some warm chicken broth or water with your dog’s food will have similar effects. With early intervention, separation, and time to rest, your dog will recover from kennel cough in no time. Want more tips on caring for your dog? Check out Lancaster Puppies’ blog or sign up for monthly newsletters sent straight to your inbox.

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Nov 05, 2023

German Shorthaired Pointers: Versatile Adventure Companions

The German Shorthaired Pointer is loved by hunters and outdoor enthusiasts throughout the United States for its intelligence, endurance, and versatility. Also known as the German Shorthaired Pointing Dog and GSP, this breed loves going on adventures with its family and spending plenty of time outdoors. Keep reading to learn more about these steadfast and dynamic dogs. Breed History The ancestry of the German Shorthaired Pointer can be traced back to the 1600s; however, the breed that we know today didn’t emerge until the 1800s. In 19th century Germany, hunters began breeding dogs in hopes of creating the perfect multipurpose hunting dog. These hunters wanted a dog that was a pointer, retriever, and tracker that could hunt on both land and water. The German Shorthaired Pointer made its way to the United States in 1925 and was recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1930. Today, the GSP is an accomplished sporting breed that excels in all types of competitions while still being a beloved family pet and hunting companion. German Shorthaired Pointer Characteristics Appearance & Coat German Shorthaired Pointers are medium-to-large-sized dogs that usually weigh between 45 to 70 pounds and stand around 21 to 25 inches tall. Because this is a pointer breed, the German Shorthaired Pointer has a demeanor that is strong and alert. These dogs have athletic builds and floppy triangle ears that hang down. Like many other breeds, the GSP commonly has a docked tail that is short or medium length. When alert and pointing, the German Shorthaired Pointer will freeze with its tail upright or straight out. These dogs have coats that are short, coarse, and wiry. They are typically easy to identify by their signature coat colors and markings. GSPs have coats that can be solid liver or liver and white in patterns that are patched, ticked, or roan. Despite having short coats, German Shorthaired Pointers shed moderately throughout the year and may not be a good fit for households with allergies. Temperament The German Shorthaired Pointer has a temperament that is lively and friendly. This breed is great with kids and makes a wonderful family dog; however, the GSP’s high energy level is best suited for families with kids over the age of 7. German Shorthaired Pointers are very loyal and affectionate with their families. The GSP is a great watchdog as it’s very vigilant and protective of those it loves without becoming aggressive.  Health When bought from reputable breeders, German Shorthaired Pointers are generally very healthy dogs that live around 10 to 14 years. While they don’t have many health issues, GSPs are prone to some hereditary health conditions like subaortic stenosis and idiopathic epilepsy. These hereditary conditions make it all the more important to buy from reputable breeders who screen their dogs for health issues. Outside of these conditions, GSPs can be susceptible to common canine health problems like hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy, bloat, and Von Willebrand’s Disease. Caring for a German Shorthaired Pointer The German Shorthaired Pointer’s Ideal Home German Shorthaired Pointers do best with owners who are active and enjoy the outdoors. These dogs need homes where their owners can spend plenty of time with them, including them in activities and family outings. This breed can struggle with separation anxiety and doesn’t do well when left alone for extended periods of time. GSPs generally get along well with other dogs but due to their hunting background, may chase small pets like cats and rabbits. Training Best Practices The German Shorthaired Pointer is an intelligent, adaptable breed that learns quickly. These traits make the GSP easy to train. This breed is eager to please its family and responds well to positive reinforcement through praise, treats, and attention. That being said, GSPs may require some extra patience when training because of their high prey drives and bounds of energy. To prevent your GSP from losing interest during training, keep training short at around 15 minutes or less. Exercise Needs German Shorthaired Pointers are very active dogs with high energy and endurance. This breed needs regular physical and mental exercise every day to stay content. GSP owners may find themselves running low on energy before their dogs do. Fenced-in yards or dog parks where your GSP can run and play freely will help burn its energy without draining yours as well. While the German Shorthaired Pointer’s energy may seem like too much for many households, owners who enjoy strenuous outdoor activities like jogging, trail running, backpacking, and hiking will find the GSP to be a perfect workout buddy. Once this breed has gotten enough exercise, it will be happy to quietly lounge with its family at home. Grooming & Hygiene German Shorthaired Pointers should be brushed about once a week to keep their skin and fur healthy. Regularly brushing your GSP during seasonal changes in the spring and fall will help minimize loose hair around your home and manage your dog’s heavy seasonal shedding. If your GSP joins you swimming or fishing, always make sure to dry their ears out to prevent infections. Unless your GSP has gotten dirty playing outside, this breed will only need a bath once every few months. Like other breeds, routine nail trimming and good dental hygiene are important for your German Shorthaired Pointer’s health and comfort.   Does the German Shorthaired Pointer sound like the perfect fit for your family’s lifestyle? Find German Shorthaired Pointer puppies for sale near you!Not sure if the GSP is right for you? Take our dog breed quiz or browse breed spotlights to find out which breed is your ideal match.

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Sep 18, 2023

Best Dog Parks in Indiana

Dog parks are an excellent way to get outside, exercise your pup, and socialize with other dog owners. They typically feature a large, fenced-in, grassy area where you can let your dog off its leash to run around and play with other dogs. Some will have multiple enclosures for different sizes of dogs and some will have equipment to play with, like tunnels & ramps. If you’re new to Indiana or recently adopted a new puppy, here are our picks for the best dog parks in the Hoosier State. Paul Ruster Bark Park Located at: 11300 E Prospect St, Indianapolis, IN, US, 46239 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Paul Ruster Park in Indianapolis includes a great dog park that’s part of a network of four dog parks in Marion County called the Pooch Pass. These parks do require a yearly paid membership for each of your dogs, but there are options for discounted passes depending on when you join and how many dogs you own. The paid memberships keep your dog safe by requiring all pups to be vaccinated and help upkeep the park. Once inside the fenced-in Bark Park, you can let your dogs off their leashes to run around and play on agility equipment. Paul Ruster Bark Park is maintained by the Indianapolis Parks and Recreation. Humane Society of Indianapolis Dog Park Located at: 7929 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis, IN, US, 46268 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Humane Society of Indianapolis operates a dog park at their main location on Michigan Road. They boast a full acre of fenced-in area for your pooches to run around. You can either pay for a day pass or an annual pass to the dog park. The fees not only help maintain the property but also go towards the Humane Society’s efforts in rescuing dogs. You must provide vaccination records and your dogs must be fixed to visit the park. This keeps everyone’s pets safe while having fun. Smock Bark Park Located at: 3901 E County Line Rd, Indianapolis, IN, US, 46237 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Smock Bark Park is another park in the “Pooch Pass” network in Indianapolis. As with the Paul Ruster Bark Park, you’ll purchase an annual pass for your doggies to access these parks while keeping the community safe. The Smock Bark Park is operated by the Indianapolis Parks and Recreation. Woodland Park Dog Park Located at: 2100 Willowcreek Rd, Portage, IN, US, 46368 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Woodland Park in the City of Portage has a beautiful fenced-in dog park right next to the playground. You can bring your kids and dogs to the same park and easily keep an eye on both of them at the same time. There is no fee to enter and the park is managed by the City of Portage Parks and Recreation. Karst Farm Dog Park Located at: 5200 W Airport Rd, Bloomington, IN, US, 47403 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Right next to the Karst Athletic Complex in Bloomington is the Karst Farm Dog Park. This park features two fenced-in areas, for large and small dogs, with shade structures and drinking fountains at dog and human heights to keep you cool in the summer. The Karst Farm Dog Park is managed by the Monroe County Parks and Recreation Department and requires an annual fee to help with upkeep and maintenance. Washington Township Paw Park Located at: 115 S County Rd 575, Avon, IN, US, 46123 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook  The Washington Township Paw Park in Avon is the first dog park in Hendricks County. It provides a safe and secure space for dogs to run around. Water supply was recently added to keep your pups cool during the summer heat. The Washington Township Parks and Recreation manages the park and hosts events at the park. There is an annual fee. Bed & Biscuit Dog Park Located at: 3809 IN-32, Westfield, IN, US, 46074 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Bed & Biscuit Kennels is a grooming, boarding, and doggy daycare business that also features a wonderful dog park. You don’t need to be scheduled for an overnight stay or grooming appointment to access the park, you can become a member to access the park anytime. In the center of the park is a fun pond for water-loving pups to play in - a unique feature that you don’t find in too many dog parks. Dogwood Run at Lemon Lake County Park Located at: 6322 W 133rd Ave, Crown Point, IN, US, 46307 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Lemon Lake County Park has a great dog park called Dogwood Run. It is one of the largest dog parks in the state, with 14 acres of space for your dogs to run around. You will need a “Pooch Pass” to gain access to the dog park, which requires proof of vaccination to keep your dog and the dogs around them safe while playing. Dogwood Run is managed by the Lake County Parks and Recreation. Mishawaka Dog Park at Margaret H. Prickett Marina Park Located at: 13100 Jefferson Rd, Mishawaka, IN, US, 46545 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Near Penn High School, the Prickett Marina Park has many great features, like a boat launch, fishing piers, and a dog park. The Mishawaka Dog Park has agility equipment for training and 2 fenced-off areas for small and large dogs. The park is managed by the City of Mishawaka Parks and Recreation. Bark Park at Creek Ridge County Park Located at: 7943 W 400 N, Michigan City, IN, US, 46360 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Creek Ridge County Park includes a Bark Park with fun agility equipment to play with and dog-friendly water fountains to cool off during the summer. There are two fenced-off areas to separate small and large dogs. The Bark Park is maintained by LaPorte County Parks and financed by a daily or annual fee to access the park. Annual passes are good at all LaPorte County Bark Parks. Niles Ave Bark Park Located at: 900 N Niles Ave, South Bend, IN, US, 46617 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The first-ever dog park in South Bend is located on Niles Avenue. The park is divided into large dog/small dog partitions and is furnished completely with recycled materials such as old fire hydrants and playground equipment. The park is managed by the City of South Bend Venues, Parks, & Arts. Nappanee Dog Park Located at: 1300 N Oakland Ave, Nappanee, IN, US, 46550 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Nappanee Dog Park located at the Derksen Wetland is a great place for your dog to enjoy. They host events throughout the year, like foundational training classes, for you and your pup to participate in. You do need a membership to access the park, which helps to fund the upkeep and management of the park by the Nappanee Parks & Recreation. Rover's Run Bark Park Located at: 2770 N Franklin St, Greenfield, IN, US, 46140 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Rover’s Run Bark Park, located in Beckenholdt Park, features two fenced-off areas for large and small dogs. Rover’s Run has agility equipment throughout the park for your dogs to play on and several shade structures for you to relax while watching them play. The park does require an annual membership fee along with proof of vaccination to keep everyone safe. Rover’s Run is managed by the City of Greenfield Parks and Rec. Bark Park at Bluhm County Park Located at: 3855 S 1100 W, Westville, IN, US, 46391 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Another great dog park in LaPorte County is the Bark Park at Bluhm County Park. Membership to the LaPorte County Bark Parks gets you access to this park and three others to play in. Alternatively, you can pay a daily fee if you’re just visiting. The Bluhm location features some of the most fun equipment your dogs will play with, like a tire jump. The park is managed by LaPorte County Parks. Mehlig Dog Park Located at: 1701 W Carter St, Kokomo, IN, US, 46901 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook As the first dog park in the City of Kokomo, the Mehlig Dog Park boasts several great features, like agility equipment, a water fountain, and convenient dog waste baskets to help keep the park clean. There are two fenced sections to separate large and small dogs. The Mehlig Dog Park is free to use but the City of Kokomo Parks & Recreation relies on the generosity of donors to help maintain the park. Consider donating if you frequent the park. Dog Park at Clay Terrace Located at: 14390 Clay Terrace Blvd, Carmel, IN, US, 46032 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Clay Terrace shopping center has its own dog park that’s free for the public to use! It includes agility equipment and a unique feature is the kissing booth so you can “smooch your pooch” and snap a photo. The park is maintained by Clay Terrace and they only ask that you clean up and look after your dog to keep the park membership-free. Huntingburg Bark Park Located at: W Park Dr & Bartlett St, Huntingburg, IN, US, 47542 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Huntingburg Bark Park is a one-acre park located on the Southwest corner of Southside Park. The Bark Park includes fun agility equipment to play with and water fountains to cool off. The park is free to use and maintained by Huntingburg’s Park and Recreation but they do ask you to stop by city hall to sign a waiver before using the Bark Park. Fort Harrison State Park Dog Park Located at: 8725 Fall Creek Rd, Indianapolis, IN, US, 46256 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Fort Harrison State Park includes almost 10 acres of dog park, split into three sections with different features in each section. Two sections include agility equipment, water fountains, and shade structures. The largest section includes a pond for all of the aquatic dogs to enjoy, which is regularly tested for algae and cleaned to keep your pup safe. There are also wooded areas within the fences for your pooches to explore the canopy. The park is maintained by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources and requires an annual or weekly pass to access.

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Sep 18, 2023

All About the American Canine Association (ACA)

When buying and selling purebred puppies, registration with a national dog registry is a sought-after trait to advertise. The American Canine Association (ACA) is one of the national registries to track the pedigree and health of purebred puppies. Learn how the ACA came to be and how to register your litter with them. What is the American Canine Association (ACA)? The ACA was established in 1984 as the world's largest health-tracking dog registry and is the second largest registry in the U.S. They have a mission to improve the genetic health and lives of dogs around the world, provide educational seminars, protect the rights of breeders to provide healthy and socialized puppies, and protect the rights of the public to enjoy the friendship of dogs. They run the Star Breeder Program to encourage high-quality kennels to keep up their good practices. If you have an ACA-registered dog, you’ll receive many benefits. There is lifetime genetic health tracking, free microchip registration, a lost and found tag service, and more. ACA-registered dogs also have the opportunity to participate in ACA dog shows and other fun events. How Are Puppies Registered with the ACA? To register a litter of puppies with the ACA, at least one parent must also be a member. If one parent isn’t, it must be a member of another registry and you’ll have to provide evidence of at least a three-generation pedigree. From there, you’ll submit an application along with the number of puppies in the litter and each pup will be assigned a registration number. You can prepay for the puppies’ registration as an additional advertising selling point. Alternatively, you can simply provide the puppy’s registration number to its new owner to register and pay for it themselves. If your dam and sire are not currently registered with the ACA, you can apply for dual registration, so long as you can provide three generations of pedigree through another organization, like the American Kennel Club (AKC). Once they’re registered, you’ll enjoy all of the benefits offered by the ACA. List Your Litters Online If you are a breeder of ACA-registered dams and sires, Lancaster Puppies is a perfect place to list your puppies for sale. Our classifieds website lists hundreds of breeds for sale, reaching a national audience. We offer a convenient way to list your entire litter all at once, with the option to showcase their registration with ACA, AKA, or other registries. Register your account today to start selling.

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Sep 18, 2023

What is a Designer Breed Generation and Why is it Important?

Designer breeds, like a Goldendoodle, Pomsky, Puggle, or Labradoodle, have exploded in popularity in recent years. A dog is a designer breed if its purebred parents were intentionally crossbred to make a litter with characteristics of both breeds. They differ from mutts, who are unintentionally bred. Some of these designer breeds are becoming so popular that they may become their own breed in a few decades. Benefits of Designer Breeds The outcome of a designer litter is never known for sure, but there are a few benefits that you’ll often see. Designer breeds could be at lower risk of developing health complications associated with one of their purebred parents, such as Pug Dog Encephalitis. They can also have a longer life expectancy. Some other desirable traits, like the hypoallergenic nature of Poodles, can be inherited by a designer litter. What is a Designer Breed Generation? A designer breed generation refers to how far down the family tree a litter is from its purebred ancestry. A first generation (F1) mix is between two purebred parents who are registered with their pedigree and free from genetic disease. Designer breeds can be backcrossed with another purebred dog, creating an F1b generation. A second generation (F2) is between two F1 parents. There are a few other classifications of breed generations, but this gives you a general idea of the concept. Why Specifying Breed Generation is Important Specifying the breed generation is very important to ensure the benefits of designer breeds. A second generation Poodle mix, for example, will lose its hypoallergenic coat. The further away from the purebred ancestors they are, the more likely a designer breed is to develop its own unique health problems. They, in fact, could be at a higher risk if the breeders are not careful enough to avoid inbreeding - a problem that’s all too common for a more niche designer breed. When a litter is first generation, you also know the pedigree and healthiness of its parents because of their membership to kennel clubs. Designer breeds aren’t subject to the strict rules of kennel clubs, so later generations come with more uncertainty.

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Aug 23, 2023

Preparing a Puppy for a New Home

Welcoming a new litter of puppies into the world is exciting, but the work doesn’t stop there for dog breeders. Preparing your new litter of puppies for their new homes is an important job and one that can get overlooked by less reputable breeders. Today we are going to take a look at some health evaluations, training practices, and socialization techniques that will help your new litter make a smooth transition to their forever homes.  Puppy Socialization Socialization is one of the most important steps in preparing your new litter of puppies to join their new families. Socializing a puppy means introducing it to people, other animals, and situations that will allow it to behave well and be confident in the real world. It is a common misconception that a puppy’s socialization is up to the new owner; puppies best handle new experiences between 3 and 12 weeks old. Puppy socialization can occur at your home, by arranging puppy playdates, or traveling to meet new people. As long as your litter of puppies is regularly being introduced to new people, animals, and experiences, you will be preparing them for successful transitions to their new homes.  Crate Training Another important step in preparing your puppies for their new homes is crate training. Crate training provides puppies with a safe place when they are feeling overwhelmed by the world around them and is a big help during the potty training process. Crate training can also help prevent problem behaviors like chewing on furniture and other valuables.  The most important aspect of crate training is making the crate a safe place where dogs can calm down and ease their anxiety. If you put your puppy in the crate as punishment, they will see the crate as a negative space.  Obedience Training Obedience training is something that most puppy buyers won’t expect, but it can be a great bonus and develop your reputation as a breeder. Veterinarians recommend that puppies begin obedience training at 7-8 weeks old. At this age, they can learn basic cues like sit, stay, and come. Getting your litter of puppies started on obedience training early is a great way to prepare them for new homes and can also be a great sales tool.  Obedience training varies from puppy to puppy and breed to breed, and the Lancaster Puppies blog is filled with obedience training tips to get you started.  House Training House training your litter is essential to prepare them for being welcomed into new homes. Puppy buyers go through a lot of change as they welcome their new furry friends into their families; alleviating the stress of house training can help ease the transition.  Puppy potty training is an involved process and can vary depending on your puppies’ temperaments and breed. We have put together a comprehensive potty training guide that will help you and your puppies get house-trained before they move into their forever homes.  What to Send Along With Your Puppies This is an aspect of puppy sales that isn’t talked about very often, but we always encourage our featured breeders to send puppy buyers home with a goodie bag to help ease them into puppy parenting. This bag should always include things like medical records, vaccine information, spaying or neutering documentation, breeder contracts, and pedigree information.  We also encourage breeders to add some extras that are more related to the puppies' comfort and transitions. Things like a small bag of food, a leash, a collar, and a few toys can go a long way in transitioning the puppy and developing a positive relationship with the buyer.  Are you looking for loving homes for your next litter of puppies? Create an account and begin listing on Lancaster Puppies to find the perfect homes for your puppies.

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Aug 23, 2023

Do Senior Dogs Need Special Food?

Just like humans, dogs need additional nutrients as they grow older to stay healthy and moving. Senior dogs frequently face issues with decreased mobility and health conditions. Aging dogs are prone to eating less, developing arthritis, becoming overweight, and seeing a decline in their cognitive abilities. With the help of additional nutrients and a specialized diet approved by your vet, your dog’s senior years can be pain-free and able-bodied. How Old is a Senior Dog? The age at which a dog reaches its senior stage of life depends on its breed and size. Professionals in the field generally agree that small breeds reach senior age around 11 to 12 years, medium-size breeds at 10 years, and large breeds around 7 to 8 years. Geriatric Life Stage in Dogs Dogs that live beyond their breed’s expected lifespan fall into the geriatric category. Geriatric dogs have different nutrient needs than dogs in the senior stage of life. To ensure your geriatric dog is getting the proper nutrients and calories required, speak with your veterinarian about geriatric diet recommendations. Changes to Your Dog’s Food While every senior dog is unique with no single regimen or diet applying to all dogs, the following tips can be beneficial to prolonging your pup’s health and life. Before changing your dog’s diet or trying out a new supplement, always speak with your veterinarian first to ensure it’s a good match for your dog. Increase Protein Many senior dogs need more protein in their diets to prevent muscle loss as they age. If an elderly dog is not getting enough protein, the loss of muscle mass can make walking and standing difficult. It’s important to note that there are mixed professional opinions about how much protein senior dogs should have in their diets. While senior dogs generally need more protein, canine researchers can’t agree on how much is too much. That being said, many modern-day experts recommend senior dogs have a daily diet that is around 25 to 30 percent protein. For senior dogs with kidney issues, lower protein intake is recommended. Speak with your veterinarian to see what percentage of protein they recommend daily for your elderly dog. Incorporate Omega 3 Fatty Acids Giving your senior dog Omega 3 fatty acids like fish oil can improve its health in many ways. With the addition of Omega 3 fatty acids in your dog’s diet, the following areas can benefit: Joints Cognition Kidneys Immune system Skin & Fur As mentioned earlier, elderly dogs commonly have trouble with mental functioning as well as mobility problems like arthritis and joint pain. Omega 3 enriched dog food and supplements can give your senior dog relief from these age-related problems. Additionally, as a dog ages, its immune system weakens. By adding Omega 3 to your dog’s diet, you’re boosting its immune system and preventing illness. Decrease Calorie Intake Maintaining your senior dog’s weight is important for preventing health conditions like obesity, osteoarthritis, and kidney disease. In addition to creating health problems, obesity can also exacerbate existing conditions and joint pain. Lowering the amount of calories your senior dog has every day can reduce the risk of obesity and related conditions. However, consult your veterinarian before making the switch to ensure your dog is getting enough calories. Encourage Your Dog to Eat Good dental hygiene plays a huge role in your dog’s health and ability to eat. If your dog seems to have trouble eating or shows signs of pain during mealtimes, have a vet examine your dog’s mouth for any problem areas. While it’s possible your dog isn’t eating because of dental issues, loss of appetite is very common in senior dogs. That being said, there are ways you can make eating easier and more enjoyable for your aging pup. Soften Dog Food If chewing is difficult for your dog, try making its food softer. You can do this by adding water to your dog’s dry food which will soften the kibble in its bowl. Similarly, your dog may benefit from a kibble that’s a smaller size. Wet food is another great way to get your senior dog to eat regularly. If your dog doesn’t approve of switching to wet food completely, serve wet and dry food mixed together for a softer meal. Make Mealtime More Comfortable Just like mobility issues affect your dog’s ability to run and play, maintaining a standing position and bending can also be difficult. If bending down to eat is keeping your dog from getting the nutrients and food it needs, try swapping its floor dish out for an elevated dish. Additionally, your elderly dog may find it easier to eat lying down as this uses less energy and muscle strength. Keep Your Dog Hydrated Senior dogs have an increased risk of dehydration. Staying hydrated helps your dog absorb nutrients properly, function normally, and maintain healthy organs. Your dog should always have plenty of clean, fresh water for drinking. If your dog isn’t drinking enough water, try adding some bone broth to their water dish and giving them ice cubes. You can also give your dog an elevated bowl to make drinking water easier. Likewise, because senior dogs have limited mobility, placing multiple water dishes around your home or in areas your dog frequents can make water more accessible, encouraging your dog to drink more. You can also increase your dog’s water intake by adding wet food to its diet. Feed Your Dog What It Will Eat At the end of the day, you want your senior dog to be eating. If the only thing getting your dog to eat is kibble with little nutritional value, that’s still better than your dog not eating at all. Elderly dogs may not show signs of hunger or even know when they’re hungry, so it’s important to keep a regular feeding schedule with food your dog will eat.   For more information on caring for your dog in every stage of life, check out our blog or stay in touch with Lancaster Puppies’ monthly newsletter.

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Aug 23, 2023

Breed Spotlight: Pugs

Pugs are lovable little companions that are great for families with kids. They’re playful and adaptable to pretty much any environment, making them an ideal pet for many households. They have a unique history involving ancient China and medieval royalty before crossing the sea to the U.S. Keep reading to learn more about the Pug’s personality, history, and care. Breed History The Pug is recognized as one of the oldest known dog breeds, with evidence of their origins dating back to 400 BC in China. They share similar origins to the Pekingese and Shih Tzu and were a pet of Tibetan monks in that time. They made their way into eastern imperial courts where they were given as gifts to western merchants. In the 16th century, Pugs were brought to Europe by Dutch merchants. Legend has it that a pug saved the life of the Prince of Orange from Holland’s royal house when the pug barked to warn him of an attack on his camp. Shortly after, Pugs became the House of Orange’s mascot and were brought with William and Mary of Orange to England. This caused the breed to explode in popularity all over Europe and spread to the new world. They were first recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1885. Pug Characteristics Appearance & Coat Pugs always have a short, smooth coat that is either completely black or fawn with black markings on their face. Their muzzles are distinctly flat, with wrinkles all over their face. They are in the Toy size category and have a short, curled tail. Temperament Pugs are lovable and playful pets. They do very well with children, gently playing when they’re engaged by kids. They can also adapt to be the perfect lap dog for you, with lower energy than other small breeds. They can, however, be difficult to housebreak, so pay close attention to them when you first them home. Health Pugs are, unfortunately, susceptible to various conditions, so be prepared to take them to the vet for frequent check-ups. Most notably, Pugs’ smushed noses can cause brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome, which will need to be lasered open. There is also a condition called Pug Dog Encephalitis, which is an inflammation of the brain. They are also at risk of eye conditions, skin problems, nerve degeneration, epilepsy, allergies, luxating patellas, hemivertebrae, and back issues. Caring for a Pug A Pug’s Ideal Home A Pug’s ideal home is really anywhere with a loving family. They adapt tremendously to any environment they live in, be it an apartment or a large house. They also do well with people of all ages, young and old. Pugs are affectionate and sometimes needy, however, so be willing to show them affection too. Training Best Practices Pugs can get lazy and become obese unless you train them to enjoy exercise. As mentioned before, it can be difficult to housebreak your pug, so keep an eye on them and positively reinforce good behavior when they use the bathroom outside. Pugs are relatively intelligent and very affectionate, so they will be eager to please you by learning tricks. Just keep up with the positive reinforcement! Exercise Needs As mentioned before, pugs are moderate to low-energy dogs who need motivation to exercise. The upside to this is that you don’t need to take them on several walks each day. But you need to be persistent in taking your pug on a walk once a day or playing a game, like fetch. Grooming & Hygiene Pugs are very easy to take care of, really only needing a brush once a week. They are moderate shedders year-round, though, and more frequent brushing could help. Their wrinkly skin could get dirty and irritated, so cleaning them once a month will help prevent those issues. Do Pugs sound like the perfect breed for you? Find adorable Pug puppies near you today, or browse similar breeds on Lancaster Puppies. 

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Aug 23, 2023

Dog Dental Care: Why It’s Important & How to Do It

Good dental hygiene is important for the overall health of your dog. If your dog develops problems with its teeth and mouth, those problems can make your dog sick and cause damage to other areas of its body. Keeping your dog’s teeth clean doesn’t have to be a difficult or time-consuming task. There are multiple fast and easy products you can use at home or get from your vet. At-Home Dental Care It’s recommended that you brush your dog’s teeth once a day. However, if you aren’t able to brush your dog’s teeth daily, you should at least do it 3 times a week. Remember that all products purchased should be safe for dogs to use. Using a product created for humans or other animals, like cats, can be ineffective and make your dog sick. Dog-Safe Toothbrush & Toothpaste The most obvious method of cleaning your dog’s teeth is a toothbrush and dog-safe toothpaste. When choosing a toothbrush for your dog, make sure you get one that matches your dog’s size. If a traditional toothbrush doesn’t work for your dog, you may find it easier to use a finger toothbrush. A finger toothbrush is a special toothbrush that fits on your index finger and can be rubbed over your dog’s teeth. Dog toothpaste comes in different flavors and doesn’t need to be rinsed off after being applied. You should only use dog-safe toothpaste and never substitute it for human toothpaste as its ingredients are very harmful to dogs. Using a toothbrush and dog-safe toothpaste is one of the most effective ways to clean your dog’s teeth and can be more affordable than other methods. Dental Supplements Dental supplements, like dental powder, don’t require any extra work from you to keep your dog’s teeth clean. These supplements are generally added to your dog’s food so you won’t need to get close to their face or open their mouth. With dental powder, all you need to do is sprinkle the suggested amount onto your dog’s food every meal. Continued regular use will give your dog a cleaner mouth and fresher breath. Dental Water Additives Water additives are a popular way to keep your dog’s mouth clean and healthy. These additives are easy and safe to use since they are created for your dog to ingest. With a water additive, all you need to do is pour the suggested amount into your dog’s water bowl and let the solution do its work when your dog drinks water. Dental Treats Giving your dog crunchy, solid dental treats that require chewing will help scrape off plaque and tartar. Dental treats are very helpful for dogs that hate having their teeth brushed. Just like normal treats, you should follow the suggested portion size and avoid any flavors your dog is allergic to. Similar to dental treats, giving vegetables like carrots and cucumbers can also help keep your dog’s teeth clean when chewed. You can even freeze vegetables before giving them to your dog to encourage chewing. Just make sure anything you give your dogs is safe for them to eat! Chew Toys Giving your dogs chew toys will help scrape plaque off their teeth while they play. This method is great for dogs that won’t allow you near their face or teeth. If you have a dog that may bite, dental chew toys take away any risk of being bitten while trying to clean your dog’s teeth. There are even chew toys designed to promote dental health! Dental Wipes Dog dental cleaning wipes are an excellent alternative for dogs that don’t allow their owners to use canine toothbrushes and toothpaste. With dental wipes, you can use your finger to rub your dog’s teeth. This method is less messy than using a toothbrush but is less effective at scraping off plaque. Additionally, dental wipes work best when combined with another type of dental care such as chew toys or dental treats. The wipes soften the plaque which makes it easier for dental toys and treats to scrape it off. Depending on how frequently you use dental wipes for your dog, this method can be expensive because each wipe is single-use. Signs of Dental Issues Different dogs can show discomfort and pain differently; however, there are some general indicators that your dog’s mouth may need vet treatment. Signs your dog may be having trouble with its mouth and teeth include the following: Not eating or having trouble eating Foul-smelling breath Gums that are bleeding, inflamed, or appear to be causing pain Teeth that are broken, missing, or appear to be causing pain If you notice any of these issues with your dog’s teeth or gums, contact your veterinarian and schedule an appointment to get your dog’s mouth examined. Prioritize Prevention & Annual Check-Ups When you go to a routine vet check-up once a year, your dog’s teeth will be examined. Routine visits to the vet are important for catching any problems early on. If your dog’s dental hygiene is struggling, your veterinarian can give you recommendations or schedule a cleaning to treat any issues. Speak With Your Vet If dental hygiene and health are issues for your dog, ask your vet about routine dental cleanings. Your vet can suggest which products are best for your dog in particular or schedule a dental cleaning appointment. These appointments can be expensive as they require your dog to go under anesthesia, but keep in mind that general prevention is much more affordable than dental treatment. Want to learn more about caring for your four-legged companion? Subscribe to Lancaster Puppies’ monthly newsletter or check out our blog!

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Aug 23, 2023

Portuguese Water Dogs: Steadfast Fishing Buddies

Portuguese Water Dogs have a vast history that goes back centuries, with their love of water remaining an intrinsic trait throughout the years. Engaging in various aquatic activities from water rescues to assisting with fishing, this friendly breed loves having a job and staying active. Keep reading to learn more about the Portuguese Water Dog’s personality, history, and care. Breed History The Portuguese Water Dogs’ exact origins are unknown; however, the breed can be traced back to the 1200s and is believed to be related to the Poodle. These dogs are largely recognized for their work helping fishermen along the coast of Portugal. Portuguese Water Dogs would assist fishermen by acting as a courier between boats and land, retrieving items from water, and herding fish into nets. As technology advanced, fishermen no longer relied on help from Portuguese Water Dogs and the breed began to dwindle in numbers. In the 1930s, the breed caught the interest of Vasco Bensuade, a rich Portuguese businessman who started breeding Portuguese Water Dogs. Bensuade and his sire Leão were so important in saving the breed from extinction that many modern-day Portuguese Water Dogs can be traced back to Leão. By the 1960s this breed had found its way to the United States and was recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in the early 1980s. Today, the Portuguese Water Dog is a well-loved athletic companion and water rescue dog. Portuguese Water Dog Characteristics Appearance & Coat The Portuguese Water Dog is a medium-sized dog that stands around 17 to 23 inches tall and weighs between 35 to 60 pounds. This breed has triangle ears that hang down, a curved tail that’s either downward or upright, and an athletic build. Portuguese Water Dogs have waterproof coats that are either black, brown, or white. Their coats can be solid or have markings. This breed has a single coat that’s thick and either curly or wavy. Because it doesn’t have an undercoat, the Portuguese Water Dog sheds lightly. Its light-shedding coat makes this breed a good fit for families with allergies or people who don’t want loose hair throughout their homes. Temperament Portuguese Water Dogs are intelligent, friendly dogs that love spending time with their families. Due to their social natures, these dogs don’t enjoy being left alone or kenneled for extended periods of time. The Portuguese Water Dog is playful and gentle, two traits that are apparent in its interactions with children. These dogs are dedicated to their families and will be a protective watchdog if needed. Even though they can be protective, Portuguese Water Dogs are very cuddly and love curling up with their owners. These affectionate and adaptable dogs are happy to spend the day playing and exploring with their families. Health The Portuguese Water Dog is known to be a healthy breed that lives around 11 to 13 years. However, being purebred, this breed still needs to be examined for hereditary conditions. Routine check-ups at your vet are necessary for your dog to stay healthy. To ensure they are in good health, Portuguese Water Dog owners should have their dogs checked for hip dysplasia, Addison’s Disease, follicular dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Because these dogs love spending time in the water, their ears need to be frequently dried and cleaned to avoid ear infections. Caring for a Portuguese Water Dog The Portuguese Water Dog’s Ideal Home Portuguese Water Dogs need owners who are active and can meet their daily exercise needs. While they are best suited for homes with fenced-in backyards to run and play, these dogs can also live in apartments if they get enough exercise. The Portuguese Water Dog’s ideal family is one that’s attentive and enjoys spending time outdoors, especially in or around water. Owners that travel often should be prepared to bring their Portuguese Water Dogs along on adventures. These athletic dogs need families that will spend plenty of time with them and see them as part of the family. Training Best Practices This breed is highly intelligent, eager to please, and easy to train. Portuguese Water Dogs respond well to positive reinforcement like treats and praise. Owners usually find their Portuguese Water Dogs can pick up tasks and commands quickly without any problems. Obedience training is a great way to bond with these dogs and help them burn off energy. Exercise Needs Portuguese Water Dogs are part of the working dog group, so they need to be kept busy or given a job to do. This breed is full of energy and will need both physical and mental exercise every day. To exercise your dog mentally, you can teach them new tricks, take them on enrichment walks, and encourage play with interactive toys and puzzles. These dogs love spending time outdoors and enjoy burning energy in many ways. You can exercise your Portuguese Water Dog through swimming, fishing, hiking, biking, long walks, and trail running. This breed needs around 40 minutes to 1 hour of intense exercise every day to stay content and healthy. Grooming & Hygiene A Portuguese Water Dog’s thick coat is high maintenance and needs regular care. To keep this breed’s coat healthy and tangle-free, it will need to be brushed around 2 to 3 times each week. Likewise, these dogs should be trimmed on a monthly basis to keep their coats manageable. Portuguese Water Dogs should be given a bath once a month or every other month. Any time these dogs spend time in a pool, lake, creek, or pond, you will need to wash them off with clean water to remove dirt and chemicals. Just remember to always dry out your dog’s ears after they spend time in the water or get a bath! Does the Portuguese Water Dog sound like the perfect canine companion for your lifestyle? Find Portuguese Water Dog puppies near you! To learn more about these dogs and browse similar breeds, check out Lancaster Puppies.

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Aug 23, 2023

How to Set Up a Whelping Box and Weaning Pen for a New Litter

Is your dam ready to give birth to her new litter of puppies? You’ll need to prepare a whelping box for her. This will be the space where her litter will live out their first few weeks of life before being adopted by their new owners. Then, when they’re old enough to play, you’ll need to expand your area to include a weaning pen. This is where they’ll play & where prospective buyers can interact with them. Taking time to prepare will reduce your risk of whelping complications. Create the Whelping Area Early You’ll want to set up your whelping area at least a week before your dam is due. This will allow her to become familiar with it and more comfortable during the whelping. Pick a spot she is already familiar with and place some of her favorite toys there to help. Try to coerce her to sleep there with treats or other positive reinforcement but never force her into it. Finally, you’ll want to keep other dogs away from this space, before and after the birth. This is her spot for her litter and other dogs can threaten the safety of that spot. How to Build a Whelping Box What size should you build? When you build or buy a whelping box, the size depends on the size of your dog. Larger breeds need more space to spread out and smaller breeds need less space to stop the puppies from wandering too far from their mother. Small breeds should have boxes around 2 feet in both directions, medium breeds 2 ½ feet, large breeds 3 ½ feet, and extra large breeds 4 feet or more. Another way you could measure the ideal size is to measure your dam lying down and add 1 foot. What materials should you use? Plain wood or another absorbent material should be avoided. This will soak up germs from fecal matter and urine, increasing your pups’ risk of infection. A non-absorbent material, like plastic, will work best but you could also line a wooden box with a vinyl mat. How to construct the whelping box You’ll start by building up the sides of the box. They should be tall enough to keep the puppies within the box but low enough for their mother to walk freely about 6-12 inches. Then, you’ll want to add a puppy railing a few inches from the bottom. This is for when puppies sneak their way behind their mother. It helps prevent them from being smothered by her. Lastly, if you constructed it out of wood, line the box with your liner. If building your own whelping box seems too difficult, you can always opt to purchase a professional one from a retailer, like Dura-Whelp. What to Include in a Whelping Area We mentioned earlier that you don’t want your box to absorb bacteria from fecal matter. Likewise, you’ll want to clean up the messes frequently. You should also have disposable, absorbent material, like newspaper, to line your box and keep the space clean. Newborn puppies are sensitive to temperature, so oftentimes you’ll need a heat lamp in the area to keep it between 80-85℉. Optionally, you could place a heating pad beneath the whelping box. You’ll want to bring your dog’s food and water to the whelping area because she won’t want to leave her puppies. It should be raised up off the ground, however, to keep the puppies from falling into it. Expanding to a Weaning Pen After about 3 weeks, your puppies will want to start exploring. So, you’ll need a weaning pen to keep them contained. This is where your puppies will live for the next 5 to 7 weeks. You can start welcoming prospective buyers to visit at around 6 weeks of age, or after their second round of vaccinations. Many states prohibit the selling of puppies until 8 weeks, however. Within the pen, you’ll want more absorbent, disposable material for easy cleanup. The pen’s fence should be tall - 1-2 feet, depending on the breed. The width of the pen depends on how many puppies are in the litter - more puppies need more space to play. It’s a good idea to throw some toys in with them, too. During this time you can also start weaning your puppies off of milk and onto solid food, so you’ll need feeding bowls and water within the pen. You should start with mushy, soft food and it might be a good idea to put it in their mother’s bowl to show it’s OK to eat. Where to Sell Puppies After Whelping As mentioned above, after the puppies receive their second round of vaccinations, visitors can come play with the puppies in their weaning pen and pick one to take home. After 8-10 weeks in the whelping area, your puppies should be ready to transition to a new home! You can find ways to advertise locally, like your local newspaper classifieds or a community bulletin board, but the simplest way is with online classifieds, like Lancaster Puppies! Create a seller account today and instantly connect with buyers around the U.S.

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Aug 23, 2023

Common Whelping Complications & How to Prevent Them

When your dog goes into labor, it’s an exciting but nerve-wracking time. While there are many complications that are possible during delivery, being prepared and knowing your vet’s information will help you navigate any issues that may arise. Learn how to prevent common whelping complications, as well as when you should contact your vet. Contacting or Visiting Your Vet An emergency vet that can visit or take calls after hours is vital when you have a pregnant dog. This is especially important if a vet’s assistance is needed during delivery. Before your dog goes into labor, you should have a delivery plan laid out that includes your vet’s contact information in case of an emergency or complications. If a vet cannot visit you, you’ll need to make a trip to the vet yourself. When taking your dog to a vet during any whelping stage, always bring any delivered puppies along. Place newborn puppies in a box separate from the dam and put a warm heat pad or water bottle in the box. Be sure the heating pad or warm water bottle has a covering on it so it doesn’t burn the newborn puppies if they come into contact with it. Eclampsia Eclampsia is a potentially deadly issue where the dam’s calcium levels are severely low. This condition affects all dog breeds but is most prevalent in small dogs. Eclampsia happens mainly in the weeks following delivery when the dam is nursing her puppies. Symptoms of eclampsia in your dam include collapse, panting, weakness, restlessness, a different way of walking, shaking, stiffness, trembling, and drooling. Continued nursing and milk supply to puppies will deplete calcium levels in dams, however, giving your dog too much calcium like calcium supplements can also cause eclampsia. To avoid this condition, give your dam food that is specifically created for pregnant and lactating dogs. Speak with your vet to find the best, balanced diet for your dam or pregnant dog. If you notice your dog is showing signs of eclampsia, take her to the vet right away. Mastitis Mastitis is an infection that affects a dog’s mammary glands. This issue generally takes place in the weeks after a dog gives birth and is producing milk. This is a fast-progressing issue that needs immediate vet attention and care to avoid the condition worsening. Symptoms of mastitis include your dog not wanting to nurse her puppies, showing aggressive behavior toward puppies when they are trying to nurse, discolored milk caused by pus or blood, not eating, lethargy, vomiting, fever, and feeling hot to the touch. You can avoid mastitis by clipping the puppies’ nails, keeping the whelping area clean and dry, regularly cleaning your dam’s mammary glands, and ensuring all mammary glands are being used evenly for nursing. Cleanliness is one of the biggest defenses against mastitis, so maintaining a clean whelping location will go far in keeping the dam and her puppies safe. Dystocia Dystocia occurs when a dog in labor is unable to deliver or push out a puppy. Dystocia is a serious complication that, if left untreated or without vet help, can result in the deaths of the puppies and mother dog. A dog with dystocia will usually need an emergency C-section, so timely action and contact with your vet are crucial. Signs your dog may experience or is experiencing dystocia include an extended pregnancy, a long labor with no delivery, and/or a stillborn puppy. When a dam’s pregnancy extends beyond its due date, specifically 70 or more days from the date it was bred, puppies can grow too big to be safely delivered through the birth canal. Additionally, prolonged pregnancy can lead to issues with the placenta that cut off oxygen and lead to stillborn puppies. A dam’s labor and delivery should not exceed 24 hours. Signs of complications that require you to contact your vet include: Your dog is in labor for 4 hours with no puppies delivered. More puppies are inside but it’s been 4 hours since the last puppy was delivered. Your dog has been experiencing strong contractions for 30 minutes without delivering the first puppy. Your dog has been experiencing weak contractions for 2 to 3 hours without delivering the first puppy. There are many biological factors that can lead to dystocia like puppy abnormalities, uterus abnormalities, birth canal conditions, and pelvis damage or size. While these biological causes can’t be prevented during pregnancy, you can help reduce the risk of dystocia by introducing your dog to her whelping area early on, creating a whelping area that is as stress-free as possible, and ensuring your dam has a balanced diet meant for pregnant dogs. Breech Position Puppies are generally delivered with their heads or back legs appearing first. A puppy delivered head-first is known as an anterior presentation, while a puppy delivered feet-first is a posterior presentation. A breech delivery happens when a puppy is delivered tail or butt-first with no hind legs present. This can also be detected if the dam’s vulva has a lump behind it or if the dam is having trouble pushing out a puppy. While there isn’t much you can do to prevent a puppy from being delivered in a breech position, you can get guidance and avoid further delivery complications by immediately contacting your vet. It’s important to have this contact information on hand during whelping so you don’t need to go searching for it. Excessive Dark or Green Discharge A small amount of green discharge isn’t cause for concern as this is what puppy placenta normally looks like. However, if there is a lot of dark or green discharge there may be an issue with the puppy’s placenta. Problems with a puppy’s placenta can lead to loss of oxygen, so your vet should be contacted right away for assistance and advice. Assistance for Dog’s First Delivery Dogs delivering puppies for the first time may not know what to do with the amniotic sac. If your dog does not remove the sac herself after delivering a puppy, you’ll need to do it for her to ensure the puppy can breathe. To do this, use your fingers or paper towels to break open the sac. You then want to expose the puppy’s mouth and nose so it can get air. Don’t use any sharp objects, like scissors or a knife, to break the sac as these items can harm the puppy inside. Likewise, dams generally sever their puppies’ umbilical cords themselves by chewing them. However, if this isn’t done after a few hours you’ll need to do it yourself to prevent infections. There are various ways to do this but speaking with your vet before your dog goes into labor is recommended. Your vet can give you information on what to do and what sterilized tools to use if this happens.   Being prepared and creating a safe, dry, clean, and quiet whelping environment for your pregnant dog is one of the best ways to prevent whelping complications. Speak to your vet about creating a balanced diet for your dog to ensure she is getting all the nutrients she needs to carry and deliver her puppies. When you are informed on what to look for and how to prevent whelping complications, delivery for your dam and her puppies will be easier. Are you looking for loving homes for a litter of puppies? Create an account and begin listing on Lancaster Puppies to find dog lovers near you.

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Aug 23, 2023

Best Dog Breeds for Adventurous Outdoor Enthusiasts

Dogs are great companions for outdoor activities, however, not all breeds have the stamina or high energy levels required for rigorous outdoor ventures and workouts. Breeds that join their owners when traveling, hiking, or on other outdoor activities need to have the trainability and intelligence necessary for quick recall and obedience. Keep reading to learn more about the best dog breeds for outdoor enthusiasts. Bernese Mountain Dog Activities: Skiing, Snowboarding, Hiking, Sledding & Sled Pulling, Camping, Traveling, Winter Sports The Bernese Mountain Dog is a large breed with a lifespan of 7-10 years. These dogs typically stand around 23 to 28 inches tall and weigh between 70 to 110 pounds. Bernese Mountain Dogs were bred for strength and resistance to Switzerland’s cold, snowy weather. This makes them wonderful companions for activities in cold climates like mountain or alpine sports. In contrast, the Bernese Mountain Dog’s heavy coat is not well suited for hot temperatures. This breed is intelligent, easy to train, calm, and obedient. The Bernese Mountain Dog is very friendly, gentle, and playful while still being protective of its owner when needed. Although this breed is protective, it’s not aggressive and gets along well with other people and animals. Bernese Mountain Dogs are perfect pets for active families and can pull kids in wagons or carts when they get too tired to walk. Border Collie Activities: Hiking, Swimming, Backpacking, Camping, Trail Running, Biking, Fishing, Water Sports Border Collies have very high intelligence and energy levels. These are working dogs that are trainable and love having a job to do. They’re incredibly agile and have plenty of stamina for rigorous outdoor activities and training. This is a relatively healthy breed that generally lives around 10 to 16 years. Border Collies are medium-sized dogs that stand around 20 to 22 inches tall and weigh between 25 to 45 pounds. This breed can tolerate warmer temperatures and loves being outside. When given the opportunity and space, Border Collies will enjoy running free to expel energy. These dogs are loyal to their owners and become protective when they perceive something as a threat. Labrador Retriever Activities: Hiking, Hunting, Swimming, Camping, Traveling, Water Sports, Backpacking Labrador Retrievers are full of stamina and energy. These are large dogs that weigh between 55 to 80 pounds and stand around 21 to 23 inches tall. Labradors are great for first-time dog owners as they’re easy to train and have even temperaments. These friendly dogs fit well in group activities, getting along with other people and dogs. With a lifespan of 10 to 14 years, the energetic and upbeat Labrador Retriever will be an excellent companion for years. These dogs can join in on family activities and trips, adjusting well to changes in their environments. Labradors are perfect for solo or group travelers because they love being around people and will be protective without becoming aggressive. German Shorthaired Pointer Activities: Hunting, Swimming, Water Sports, Hiking, Backpacking, Camping, Trail Running, Fishing The German Shorthaired Pointer is an athletic and alert dog with tons of energy and stamina. This dog is very intelligent and protective of its loved ones. These sporting breed dogs are medium-sized, standing around 21 to 25 inches tall and weighing between 45 to 70 pounds. German Shorthaired Pointers generally live around 10 to 14 years and aren’t hard to train. They love being by their families’ sides which makes them fantastic companions for active, outdoor-loving owners. However, German Shorthaired Pointers do best in warmer climates as they don’t have much fur to keep them warm. Rhodesian Ridgeback Activities: Hunting, Hiking, Backpacking, Camping, Trail Running, Mountain Biking The Rhodesian Ridgeback is a large breed that stands around 24 to 27 inches tall and weighs between 65 to 90 pounds. These dogs are intelligent and independent, so training isn’t difficult but they can have a stubborn streak. Rhodesian Ridgebacks were originally used to guard livestock and hunt lions in South Africa. Between their short coats and South African origins, Rhodesian Ridgebacks are not good fits for colder temperatures or outdoor winter activities. This breed is very loyal and affectionate with its owners but can be suspicious of strangers. These traits make this dog a good companion for fellowship and safety when hiking, backpacking, and camping. Rhodesian Ridgebacks generally live around 10 to 12 years and are agile, strong, and brave with an abundance of energy and stamina. They love running and will gladly join their owners for rigorous daily workouts and adventures. Australian Shepherd Activities: Camping, Hiking, Backpacking, Mountain Biking, Traveling, Trail Running The Australian Shepherd is a popular family dog that gets along well with kids and other animals. These medium-sized dogs have lots of energy for all kinds of sports and activities. Australian Shepherds are very loyal to their families but will become protective if they feel threatened. The Australian Shepherd has a lifespan of 12 to 15 years and grows to be around 18 to 23 inches tall with a weight between 40 to 65 pounds. Australian Shepherds are intelligent and eager to please, making them easy to train. This breed is a perfect traveling buddy as it’s adaptable, outgoing, and enjoys spending time with its owners. Australian Shepherds thrive in homes with owners who are as athletic and active as them. These versatile dogs love the outdoors and going on new adventures with their families. Siberian Husky Activities: Skiing, Snowboarding, Sledding, Hiking, Backpacking, Camping, Trail Running, Biking, Sled Pulling The Siberian Husky is a medium-sized breed that stands around 20 to 24 inches tall and weighs between 35 to 60 pounds. Siberian Huskies live around 12 to 14 years and are wonderful pets for athletic families, couples, and singles. They are incredibly outgoing and social, so they do great in groups of people and households with other dogs. The Siberian Husky is an adaptable dog with high endurance, energy, and stamina. This breed loves to run and should be kept on a leash whenever it's not in a fenced-in or enclosed area. Originally used as sled dogs and able to withstand cold temperatures, Huskies are fantastic companions for outdoor winter sports and activities. Portuguese Water Dog Activities: Swimming, Water Sports, Hiking, Hunting, Fishing, Trail Running, Biking Evident in its name, the Portuguese Water Dog loves swimming and spending time in the water. These medium-sized dogs live 11 to 13 years, stand around 17 to 23 inches tall, and weigh between 35 to 60 pounds. Portuguese Water Dogs blend perfectly with active families as they get along great with kids and other animals. The Portuguese Water Dog is an intelligent breed that’s eager to please and learn new tricks, so training isn’t a difficult task. Portuguese Water Dogs love spending time with their families and participating in athletic activities that burn off their abundant energy. Used in the past for water retrieving and fish herding, these dogs will have a blast joining their owners on adventures involving water sports and activities. They love nothing more than exploring at their owners’ sides. Vizsla Activities: Camping, Hiking, Backpacking, Hunting, Swimming, Water Sports, Biking, Trail Running, Fishing The Vizsla is an athletic and energetic sporting dog that has high endurance for rigorous outdoor activities. These dogs are very fast, love running, and do well on land as well as in the water. Vizslas are versatile and enjoy almost any athletic activity, especially exercising outdoors with their owners. These medium-sized dogs have a lifespan of 10 to 15 years, stand around 21 to 25 inches tall, and weigh between 45 to 65 pounds. Vizslas have calm demeanors but are very loyal and protective of their families. Even with their protective nature, Vizslas are friendly toward strangers and aren’t aggressive. This breed is known for being easy to train due to its intelligence, eagerness to please, and strong memory. Agile and fearless, the Vizsla is the perfect companion for outdoor adventures.  Australian Cattle Dog Activities: Camping, Hiking, Backpacking, Running, Mountain Biking, Swimming, Water Sports, Fishing, Hunting The Australian Cattle Dog, also known as the Blue Heeler, is an incredibly athletic, energetic, and muscular breed. These dogs have long lives that last around 12 to 16 years and love burning off energy. Intelligent, alert, and loyal, the Australian Cattle Dog is a protective defender of its family and property. This breed is medium-sized at roughly 17 to 20 inches tall and 35 to 50 pounds. These dogs enjoy almost every sport and outdoor activity. Australian Cattle Dogs are in the herding group, which means they love having a job to do. This desire for a purpose or job makes them perfect companions for fishers and hunters. They’re also excellent running partners as they have high endurance and energy. The Australian Cattle Dog is an ideal fit for families and households who enjoy being active and spending time outdoors. Looking for an adventure buddy to travel and spend time outdoors with? Get started by finding puppies for sale near you on Lancaster Puppies.

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Aug 23, 2023

Breed Spotlight: Schnauzers

As the loyal working dogs of German farmers, Schnauzers make excellent, lovable additions to families with kids. They are intelligent, easy to train, and hypoallergenic. Learn more about these affectionate pups. Breed History Schnauzers come in three varieties, standard, giant, and miniature, all of which can trace their origins to Germany in the Middle Ages. They are a working breed, originally bred for guard duty and rat catching. Over the years, they were bred up and down in size to make them more suitable for cattle driving and rat-catching, respectively. The Standard Schnauzers were popular show dogs as soon as they arrived in the U.S. but it took until the 1920s and ‘30s for the miniature and giant varieties to be recognized as separate breeds. Schnauzer Characteristics Appearance & Coat Schnauzers are squarely built with distinctively long-haired snouts and eyebrows. Their tails are typically cropped and sometimes their ears are as well. Their coats are often stiff and wiry and come in black, salt & pepper, or gray. Temperament All Schnauzers are intelligent and loyal to their families. This makes them easy to train and great guard dogs. They are, however, territorial which makes them apprehensive of strangers and a bit loud. Health The Schnauzer is a very healthy breed that is free from many health concerns others might be subject to. Nonetheless, you should always test your dogs for hip dysplasia and eye diseases, just in case.  Caring for a Schnauzer Schnauzer’s Ideal Home Schnauzers are excellent with children of all ages but do better in a single-pet home. Their rat-catching instincts can cause trouble with smaller pets. They have a tendency to bark; living in an apartment or townhouse, they might annoy your neighbors. They love exploring, so a fenced-in yard would be ideal to allow them to safely roam. Training Best Practices Schnauzers are extremely intelligent, making them rather easy to train. Use positive reinforcement over a few repetitions and they’ll catch on quickly. Because of their wits, Schnauzers can become bored after just a few repetitions so keep training sessions short. Exercise Needs The energetic Schnauzer needs plenty of exercise but it can come from a variety of activities. Schnauzers will enjoy playing with other dogs, going on long hikes, or agility training all with enthusiasm. Find a fun activity that suits your lifestyle and do it often! Grooming & Hygiene Schnauzers are hypoallergenic dogs that do not shed. That being said, you still need to groom them, washing their beards and hand stripping their coats often. With all dogs, you should trim their nails regularly. Does the Schnauzer sound like a good match for your family? Check out Schnauzer listings today and adopt your new furry family member!

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Jun 06, 2023

Dog Age & Breeding: Why It Matters

Breeding dogs at the right age is important for healthy litters and ethical breeding. There are many factors like a dog’s size and breed that also affect when it can be used as a stud or dam. Keep reading to learn when dogs can start breeding and when they should stop. Gender & Breed Affect When Breeding Can Begin Male and female dogs don’t reach breeding age at the same time. Male dogs are able to be used for breeding sooner than female dogs. Female dogs must reach a healthy size and weight to carry a litter, while stud dogs don’t have these same physical requirements. Similarly, a dog’s breed and size affect how fast it matures. Small dog breeds generally mature faster than larger breeds. Because they reach adult size quickly, small dogs can be bred sooner than large dogs. Each dog grows differently, so you should always check with your vet before using a dog, whether male or female, for breeding. When Can Female Dogs Start Breeding? Female dogs become fertile and go into heat before they reach adulthood, but this isn’t a sign they are old enough to breed. In fact, female dogs should never be bred during their first heat. Because they are still growing themselves, problems will arise with litters bred from underage female dogs. If a dog becomes pregnant before she reaches full maturity, her pregnancy can delay her growth and take away vital nutrients that she needs during this growth stage. It’s essential that breeders wait to breed female dogs until they are fully grown and can carry a litter through to delivery. It’s recommended by expert dog breeders that large female dogs shouldn’t be bred until they reach 18 months of age to 2 years old. The larger the dog, the longer it takes for them to reach adult size. Extra large breeds shouldn’t be bred til around 2 years of age. In contrast, small breeds can be bred when they are around 1 year old or reach adult size. When Can Male Dogs Start Breeding? Just like female dogs, the type of breed a male dog is affects when it can be used as a stud. Male dogs of small breeds can usually be bred around 5 months of age while larger breeds will need to wait longer. That being said, small male dogs usually don’t reach their full breeding potential until they are 1 year old. Very large breeds may not reach sexual maturity until 2 years old, so it’s good to know the specifics of your dog’s particular breed and the individual dog itself. Can Female Dogs Be Too Old to Breed? If a female dog is bred late in life, there’s a higher risk of health conditions and small litters. Similar to their faster aging, small dog breeds generally have longer life expectancies than large breeds. As a result of having shorter life expectancies, big dogs will lose their ability to reproduce healthy litters much sooner than small breeds. The general age when female dogs see a big drop in fertility is at 5 years. Additionally, responsible breeders stop breeding a dam after she has had 4 litters. Female dogs remain fertile their entire lives, even into their elderly years. That being said, they shouldn’t be bred later in life because there’s a high risk of pregnancy complications like a decrease in milk production and delivering stillborn puppies. Can Male Dogs Be Too Old to Breed? Unlike female dogs, male dogs don’t experience a decline in fertility when they age. However, health issues associated with old age, such as arthritis and mobility problems can make breeding difficult. Studs shouldn’t be used for breeding once they reach 10 to 12 years old. Similar to female dogs, smaller male dogs can generally be used for breeding longer than large male dogs. Additionally, dogs that have health issues or haven’t had health checks shouldn’t be used in breeding, regardless of age. Age and health aren’t the only factors that affect a male dog’s ability to breed, temperament matters too. If a male dog becomes aggressive after being bred, it should no longer be used as a stud dog. To learn more about dog breeding, check out Lancaster Puppies’ monthly blog. See newly added litters or list your own litter to find potential families near you.

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May 26, 2023

19 Dog-Friendly Restaurants in Lancaster County

Lancaster County is home to many dog-friendly dining spots. Their dog-friendly outdoor seating makes it possible for you to enjoy a delicious meal made with fresh, local ingredients without leaving your dog at home. While these restaurants have outdoor dining spaces where dogs are allowed, keep in mind that many restaurant patios are seasonal and weather-dependent. Additionally, many restaurants require you to order inside where dogs aren’t allowed so it’s good to dine with at least 1 other person who can stay with your dog while you go in to order. That being said, there are quite a few restaurants on our list with patio serving windows that allow you to order outside. When dining on a dog-friendly patio, your dog must be well-behaved and kept on a leash at all times. You should also bring along things your dog might need like water, treats, dog food, and waste bags. Keep reading to see our list of dog-friendly restaurants in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Bird-in-Hand, PA Bird-in-Hand Bakery & Cafe 2715 Old Philadelphia Pike, Bird in Hand, PA 17505 | Serves: Breakfast, Lunch, & Sweet Treats Bird-in-Hand Bakery & Cafe is a wonderful place to stop for a quick bite and some delicious Lancaster County baked goods. This cafe has an outdoor seating area with benches and tables both in the sun and shade, perfect for bringing along your canine friends. Bird-in-Hand Bakery & Cafe remains a Lancaster County staple with pancakes, sandwiches, soups, specialty drinks, ice cream, fudge, donuts, bread, whoopie pies, apple dumplings, shoofly pie, and more! Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Ephrata, PA Black Forest Brewery 301 W Main St, Ephrata, PA 17522 | Serves: Lunch, Dinner, & Alcohol Black Forest Brewery has an outdoor patio with multiple tables and chairs for you and your dog. This brewery has many in-house craft beers on tap and also serves wine and cocktails. Their menu features a variety of classic pub food including nachos, loaded fries, bavarian pretzels, burgers, hot sandwiches, fried chicken, fish & chips, and hearty salads. They also have options and alternatives for people who are gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan, and/or vegetarian. Black Forest is the perfect place to relax outdoors with your dog and a craft beer. Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Fox Meadows Creamery 2475 W Main St, Ephrata, PA 17522 | Serves: Lunch & Sweet Treats Fox Meadows Creamery in Ephrata is a great place to take the whole family, including your dog! They have loads of outdoor seating on their shaded wrap-around porch. This creamery is best known for its delicious ice cream and assortment of flavors but also serves lunch midday. They have classic meal choices like burgers, sandwiches, salads, soups, and wraps. Fox Meadows Creamery is a beloved dog-friendly spot in Lancaster County where the ice cream is homemade on-site. Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Griddle & Grind Cafe 20 W Main St, Ephrata, PA 17522 | Serves: Breakfast & Lunch Griddle & Grind Cafe in Ephrata is popular for its unique and tasty crepes. During the warmer months, this cafe opens its back courtyard for outdoor dining and allows dogs to join their owners in this space. With both savory and sweet crepe options, Griddle & Grind is consistently evolving its menu and serving specialty drinks each month. This spot is the perfect place to meet other dog owners for brunch or a coffee date. Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Scratch Bakes 3 W Main St, Ephrata, PA 17522 | Serves: Breakfast, Lunch, & Sweet Treats Scratch Bakes is popular for its variety of freshly baked cupcakes, including their very own “pup-cup” cupcakes made just for dogs! They also have cupcake options that are gluten-free, dairy-free, and vegan. In addition to cupcakes, the cafe serves freshly made sandwiches, wraps, salads, and soup that you can enjoy with your dog at a table on their front porch. Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Downtown Lancaster, PA Chestnut Hill Cafe 532 W Chestnut St, Lancaster, PA 17603 | Serves: Breakfast, Lunch, & Sweet Treats Chestnut Hill Cafe is located in Lancaster City and has a dog-friendly outdoor seating area. Their outdoor tables and chairs are shaded with umbrellas to keep you and your pup out of the sun. The cafe serves breakfast sandwiches, pastries, wraps, paninis, ice cream, smoothies, soup, and salad. Chestnut Hill is a great spot to take a break when exploring Lancaster City or while you’re out walking your dog. Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website The Fridge 534 N Mulberry St, Lancaster, PA 17603 | Serves: Lunch, Dinner, & Alcohol The Fridge is located near the Clipper Magazine Stadium and offers hundreds of craft beers, draft beers, wine, and cocktails. Its location in downtown Lancaster makes it an easy spot to walk to with your dog and friends for a drink and a bite to eat. Their outdoor seating area has umbrella-covered tables and chairs so you can enjoy a drink with your pup at your side. The Fridge uses locally sourced ingredients in its dishes that are made fresh every day. Grab one of their popular flatbread pizzas to enjoy outdoors with your dog! Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Prince Street Cafe 15 N Prince St, Lancaster, PA 17603 | Serves: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, & Sweet Treats Located near Lancaster Central Market, Prince Street Cafe serves sandwiches, wraps, bowls, salads, pitas, smoothies, and baked goods. This cafe is perfect for grabbing a cup of coffee or sitting down for a meal. Their outdoor seating area makes it possible for you to bring your dog along whether you’re visiting with friends or stopping to get a cool, refreshing drink on a warm day. Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Rachel’s Cafe & Creperie 201 W Walnut St, Lancaster, PA 17603 | Serves: Breakfast, Lunch, & Sweet Treats Rachel’s Cafe & Creperie is located in Lancaster City and has a dog-friendly outdoor pavilion. This pavilion has a roof and fans to keep you and your dog cool. With plenty of outdoor seating available, you won’t have a hard time finding a table to sit at. This cafe & creperie’s menu features savory crepes, sweet crepes, breakfast burritos, salads, specialty drinks, and a kid’s menu. They can also make substitutions for people who are dairy-free, gluten-free, and/or vegan. Rachel's Cafe & Creperie has new specials every month and even sells fresh crepe kits for you to take home. Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Spring House Brewing Co Brewery 209 Hazel St, Lancaster, PA 17603 | Serves: Lunch, Dinner, & Alcohol Spring House Brewing Co’s brewery in Lancaster City is a popular pick for dog owners. This brewery has a dog-friendly patio with a menu just for dogs. Spring House’s patio is the perfect spot to dine if it’s just you and your dog. The patio has a service window and bell for ordering so you don’t have to leave your dog to order inside. Their patio menu features their popular brick oven pizzas, boneless wings, salads, burgers, chicken sandwiches, and pulled pork sandwiches. If you visit Spring House’s brewery without your dog, be sure to check out their arcade on the second floor. Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Intercourse, PA Kitchen Kettle Village 3529 Old Philadelphia Pike, Intercourse, PA 17534 | Serves: Breakfast, Lunch, and Sweet Treats Kitchen Kettle Village is a collection of shops and vendors selling food and goods in a walkable outdoor area. You can bring your dog along with you to enjoy the outdoor vendors and live music but will need someone to stay with your dog when you go inside shops. Enjoy snacks like kettle corn, soft pretzels, and ice cream, or dine outdoors with takeout from various restaurants in the village. Kitchen Kettle Village doesn’t have an admission fee and is a fun day trip for households of all sizes and ages. Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Lancaster, PA DJ’s Taste of the 50s 2410 Old Philadelphia Pike, Lancaster, PA 17602 | Serves: Breakfast, Lunch, & Sweet Treats Based on the classic diner experience of the 1950s, DJ’s Taste of the 50s has an outdoor dining area that's dog-friendly. Their dog-friendly porch is covered by an awning and has a window for ordering. This takeout window is ideal for dog owners dining alone with their pups as they don’t have to order inside. At DJ’s, you’ll find burgers, fries, milkshakes, ice cream sundaes, omelets, soup, salads, sandwiches, melts, pancakes, and more! Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Harvest Seasonal Grill 1573 Fruitville Pike, Lancaster, PA 17601 | Serves: Lunch, Dinner, & Alcohol Harvest Seasonal Grill in Lancaster has outdoor tables and chairs where your dog can join you. Their outdoor patio has seating in the sun or shade so you can choose which you prefer. At Harvest, you’ll find dishes made with seasonal, local ingredients such as flatbread pizzas, hot sandwiches, salads, steak, seafood, chicken, and pasta. Most of their dishes are under 500 calories and they have gluten-free, vegetarian, and vegan options available. Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Stoner Grille 605 Granite Run Dr, Lancaster, PA 17601 | Serves: Lunch, Dinner, & Alcohol Stoner Grille is a restaurant located in Stoner Commons and Overlook Community Campus, a large park owned by the Manheim Township. Stoner Grille’s big outdoor patio is open to dogs and their owners for dining. On their menu, you can find burgers, tacos, hot sandwiches, soups, salads, seafood, chicken, steak, pork, lamb, and pasta. Stoner Grille frequently has open mics and live music for guests to enjoy. The Overlook Community Campus features tons of parks and activities including a dog park and walking trails so you can grab a bite to eat and then hit the trails! Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Lititz, PA Dosie Dough 45 S Broad St, Lititz, PA 17543 | Serves: Breakfast, Lunch, & Sweet Treats Dosie Dough is a hidden gem in Lititz for breakfast, lunch, and baked goods. Their outdoor seating area is dog-friendly and shaded by trees and table umbrellas. At Dosie Dough, you’ll find breakfast sandwiches, donuts, bagels, hot and cold sandwiches, soup, salads, wraps, and plenty of delicious pastries. Dosie Dough isn’t far from the beginning of the dog-friendly Warwick to Ephrata Rail Trail so you can walk with your dog to get breakfast or fuel up before taking the trail. Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Slate Cafe 43 E Main St, Lititz, PA 17543 | Serves: Breakfast, Lunch, & Sweet Treats Slate Cafe in Lititz is a great stop for dog walkers or people walking the Warwick to Ephrata Rail Trail with their dogs. They have dog-friendly outdoor seating on their patio, however, their outdoor tables and chairs are limited and in the sun. On their menu, you’ll find breakfast sandwiches, french toast, home fries, bagels, smoothies, hot and cold sandwiches, salads, soup, quiche, and many pastries. Make sure you grab some of their house-made dog treats for your pup when you visit! Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Tomato Pie Cafe 23 N Broad St, Lititz, PA 17543 | Serves: Breakfast, Lunch, & Sweet Treats Tomato Pie Cafe is a staple among Lititz locals and is right across the street from Lititz Springs Park. This cafe has covered outdoor tables and chairs where your dog is allowed to join you. Their menu features breakfast sandwiches, omelets, french toast, oatmeal, quiche, tomato pie, hot and cold sandwiches, burgers, and salads. Enjoy a morning in the park with your dog before heading over to Tomato Pie Cafe for lunch. Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Manheim, PA The Shack Restaurant & Mini Golf 662 S Oak St, Manheim, PA 17545 | Serves: Lunch, Dinner, & Sweet Treats The Shack Restaurant in Manheim combines dog-friendly dining with a dog-friendly mini-golf course. The Shack has a big menu that includes burgers, hot and cold sandwiches, wraps, salads, seafood, pasta, and chicken. Their ice cream and sweet treats menu is just as big with milkshakes, sundaes, shaved ice, ice cream nachos, and floats. The Shack is a perfect summer activity for families as their dogs can join in on the fun of grabbing dinner and playing mini golf. Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Strasburg, PA Speckled Hen 141 E Main St, Strasburg, PA 17579 | Serves: Breakfast, Lunch, Sweet Treats, & Alcohol Speckled Hen is a locally beloved cafe in Strasburg. This cafe serves all-day breakfast for breakfast lovers and has options for people who are vegan, vegetarian, dairy-free, and gluten-free. Their menu features breakfast bowls, quiche, sandwiches, omelets, french toast, burgers, soup, salads, and more! They even have a taproom upstairs that serves local wines, craft beers, cocktails, and ciders. Speckled Hen has an outdoor patio with multiple tables and chairs where dogs are welcome to join their families. Visit Their Facebook Visit Their Website Getting hungry? Be sure to bookmark these restaurants so you can enjoy beautiful days outdoors with your dog, a cold drink, and a tasty meal this summer. For more dog owner tips and tricks, check out our blog or subscribe to Lancaster Puppies’ monthly newsletter.

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May 24, 2023

English Bulldogs: Easygoing Homebodies

The English Bulldog is well-loved throughout the United States and continues to remain a favorite breed by many. These dogs are known for being goofy, gentle, and sweet despite their intimidating appearances. The English Bulldog’s calm personality and love of lounging make it a great pet for families with kids or apartment dwellers. Keep reading to learn more about this mellow and affectionate breed. Breed History English Bulldogs have been traced back to the 13th century when they were used in bullfighting and bullbaiting. In the 1830s, animal blood sports were banned and dogfighting grew into a popular underground activity. After this change, Bulldogs were no longer a match for the new dog breeds dominating fighting rings. Although they were used to create new breeds for fighting, Bulldogs began to decrease in numbers as they were no longer taking part in fights themselves. Lovers of this breed kept English Bulldogs from going extinct by taking over their breeding and evolving them into friendly companion dogs. As the English Bulldog’s temperament was calmed over the years, this breed became a beloved family dog and was recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in the late 1880s. Today, the English Bulldog is a popular breed in the United States known for its laid-back and attention-loving personality. English Bulldog Characteristics Appearance & Coat English Bulldogs are stocky and muscular dogs with short legs, large heads, broad shoulders, stubby tails, and short triangle ears that hang down. These dogs weigh around 40 to 60 pounds and stand around 15 to 16 inches tall. English Bulldogs generally have coats and markings that are tan, white, black, and/or brindle. This breed’s fur is often described as short, straight, and smooth. The English Bulldog’s smushed-in face and wrinkly skin are defining characteristics of the breed that many people immediately recognize. Likewise, the Bulldog’s underbite and droopy jowls have transformed into endearing characteristics and trademarks of the breed. Temperament English Bulldogs are gentle, calm, loyal, and social dogs that love making new friends. They’re known to do very well with children and other pets while still being protective if they feel their families are threatened. The English Bulldog is a good-natured breed with a goofy personality that brings bounds of joy and laughter to its family. These dogs love attention from their owners and strangers, actively seeking out affection whenever they can. Even though they enjoy being social, English Bulldogs tend to be couch potatoes. These dogs adore curling up on the couch with their owners for a relaxing evening. Health These dogs are known to have many health problems, especially issues with breathing and overheating as a result of having flat noses. Additionally, their wrinkly skin and skin folds can lead to skin problems if not cleaned properly. Sadly, because of their numerous and frequent health issues, these dogs have a short lifespan of 8 to 10 years. Health issues English Bulldogs are susceptible to include brachycephalic syndrome, skin allergies, obesity, hip dysplasia, eye conditions, heat stroke, cardiac issues, and joint problems. English Bulldogs must also be born by C-section as natural deliveries are very high-risk to dams and puppies. It’s important to buy an English Bulldog from a breeder that's reputable and an expert in English Bulldogs. Reputable breeders do health checks and ancestry evaluations before breeding dogs to ensure they can produce healthy litters. Breed experts recommend that English Bulldogs be given cardiac exams, patella evaluations, and tracheal hypoplasia evaluations to keep them healthy and catch any issues early on. Caring for an English Bulldog The English Bulldog’s Ideal Home English Bulldogs are great fits for homes with children and other pets as they are gentle with children and generally do well with other animals. That being said, not all Bulldogs will get along with dogs of the same gender or cats. Owners should always be cautious when introducing new pets and should follow recommended guidelines for introductions to keep everyone safe. The English Bulldog isn’t a good fit for someone looking for a workout or hiking companion as these dogs can easily overheat and have trouble breathing. Likewise, their low energy means they’d rather relax at home and won’t have the stamina to keep up with intense activities. An English Bulldog’s ideal home is one where its owners are educated on its health issues and limitations so it can live a healthy, comfortable life. Training Best Practices Like other dogs, English Bulldogs need early socialization and training to ensure they are well-adjusted and easy to handle as they grow. These dogs can have a stubborn streak but overall aren’t very hard to train. Consistent and firm training is needed for English Bulldogs to learn. That being said, punishment for misbehavior doesn’t work on dogs and will only make them mistrust their owners. Training your Bulldog will be easiest when you stick to a training schedule and give your dog plenty of love, praise, and positive reinforcement. Exercise Needs English Bulldogs generally have low energy levels and prefer relaxing indoors over romping around the yard. Because they aren’t very active and don’t need tons of space to run around, English Bulldogs are great pets for apartment and city living. Despite their low energy, these dogs still need daily exercise to maintain their weight and prevent obesity. This can be done with quick daily walks that last around 20-30 minutes. Too much exercise can actually be dangerous for this breed as it’s very easy to overextend an English Bulldog’s breathing abilities. With a short daily walk or light play, your English Bulldog will easily meet its exercise requirements. Grooming & Hygiene These dogs are light to moderate shedders throughout the year and are not considered hypoallergenic, however, their short coats are fairly easy to maintain. English Bulldogs should be brushed a couple of times a week to keep their coats healthy and collect loose fur. Their folds and wrinkles do require extra care to avoid infections. Owners need to routinely wipe down their Bulldog’s skin folds and wrinkles to ensure all dirt and moisture are cleaned out. This breed needs to be regularly bathed and shouldn’t go more than 6 to 8 weeks without a bath. After bathing or letting your English Bulldog get wet, you need to dry in between their wrinkles and skin folds to remove moisture and prevent bacteria growth. Does the English Bulldog sound like the perfect fit for your family? Find English Bulldog puppies for sale near you! For more information on different dog breeds, check out our breed spotlight series.

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May 24, 2023

All About the American Kennel Club

When you’re in the market of adopting or selling purebred puppies, you’re bound to hear of registries like the American Kennel Club (AKC). But what exactly is the AKC, how did it begin, and how are puppies registered? Learn all you need to know about the AKC. What is the American Kennel Club? The American Kennel Club (AKC) is a non-profit organization whose mission is to “advocate for the purebred dog as a family companion, advance canine health and well-being, work to protect the rights of all dog owners and promote responsible dog ownership.” They are recognized as experts in the breeding, health, and training of purebred dogs. The AKC has a purebred dog registry and hosts various competitions across the country. AKC registration is considered the most prestigious registries with long pedigrees for all of their members. How Did the AKC Start? The American Kennel Club started in 1884 when a group of sportsmen gathered in Philadelphia as representatives from their local dog clubs. They created the first national dog club in the U.S. without any official headquarters and continued to gather over the next 3 years in various cities. In 1887, the organization rented a room in New York and officially had an office. They soon after published a stud book. In 1889, the club started publishing the Gazette, a dog magazine, which has been published without interruption for over a century. In 1905, the AKC created a points-based system for dog shows and continued to refine their comprehensive rules in the early 20th century. The middle of the century saw the last major rules updates with limiting judges to reviewing 20 dogs per hour. The organization continued to expand and recognize many other aspects of excellent dog ownership with various awards. They’ve even created the AKC Museum of the Dog to highlight the history of dog breeding. How are Puppies Registered with the AKC? Puppies are registered with the AKC much like many dog clubs register their members. As a seller, you’re able to register your litter if both the dam and sire are registered with the AKC. This guarantees the pedigree of each puppy in the litter, ensuring they are 100% purebred. Breeders can register their litters online or complete an application and mail it in. On the application, they’ll need to list the AKC numbers for the sire and dam, and how many male and female puppies were in the litter. The breeder can also pre-pay for the owners at this point, if desired. Then the AKC mails registration forms for each puppy with its unique AKC number. As a buyer, you’ll receive the paper registration form from the breeder. Using this paper form, you are able to mail in the registration or register your puppy online. This will let the club know that your puppy has a new owner and they’ll update their database. You’ll receive a certificate and you will have access to your pup’s pedigree. If you are a breeder of non-purebreds or do not have AKC-registered dams and sires, you are still able to register your litter with the AKC under a different status. Mixed puppies can be registered under the Canine Partners program. Paperless purebred puppies can be registered under the Purebred Alternative Listing program. Using one of these registrations will still be a valuable service for potential buyers, as it will allow them to participate in AKC events. List Your Litters Online If you are a breeder of puppies, whether they are AKC-registered or not, create an account with Lancaster Puppies today and list your litter for sale. We connect potential buyers with breeders all across the country. Likewise, if you’re interested in adopting a purebred puppy, there are many reputable breeders already on Lancaster Puppies, including AKC breeders. Browse the new arrivals today!

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May 24, 2023

Best Hiking Trails for Dogs in OH

Dog-friendly hiking trails are an excellent way to exercise your puppy while exercising yourself. Your puppy gets to enjoy all the smells found on the trail and you get to enjoy being surrounded by nature. Not all hiking trails welcome dogs and many that do restrict dogs to on-leash hiking. Before taking your dog on a hike, be sure to check the park rules to understand what you can and cannot do with your pup. If you are new to Ohio or recently adopted a new puppy, here are our picks for the best hiking trails for dogs in the Buckeye State. Sharon Woods Park Located at: 11450 Lebanon Road Sharonville, OH 45241 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Sharon Woods Park is a lovely park to the north of Cincinnati with plenty of trail to hike with your leashed dog. The park features a 2.6-mile paved multi-purpose trail around the lake, a 1.0-mile fitness trail, and a 0.7-mile Gorge nature trail. There are doggy water stations sprinkled throughout the trails for your pooch to recharge during a hike. There are plenty of activities for the rest of the family, too, including a playground, museum, and snack bar. Your furry friend will have to stay within the designated pet-friendly areas, however. Hueston Woods State Park Located at: 6301 Park Office Rd, College Corner, OH, US, 45003 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Hueston Woods State Park is a state park with a large lake and 12 miles of dog-friendly, wooded trails. After your hike, your dog can cool off in the lake at the dog-friendly beach area. Another unique feature of Hueston Woods is its abundance of marine fossils found in the lake’s tributaries. Your pooch might encounter some equestrian friends on the trails with them, as there’s horseback riding available to the public as well. Cuyahoga Valley National Park Located at: 1550 Boston Mills Rd, Peninsula, OH, US, 44262 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Located along the Cuyahoga River between Cleveland and Akron, Cuyahoga Valley National Park is a huge national park with over 100 miles of dog-friendly trails. The only restriction is that they must be leashed on a 6-foot or smaller leash. We recommend the 7.1 miles of the Buckeye Trail. This steep, windy trail will take you to many scenic vistas and tire out your pooch for a nap after your adventure. Mosquito Lake State Park Located at: 1439 Wilson Sharpsville Rd, Cortland, OH, US, 44410 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The 2,500-acre Mosquito Lake State Park features plenty of lovely dog-friendly hiking trails. There is also hunting and fishing available throughout if you’re into sporting with your dog. One of the best dog parks in Ohio is also within the state park, Cooperation Station, which you can check out after your hike. If you enjoy camping, dogs are also allowed in all campsites. East Harbor State Park Located at: 1169 N Buck Rd, Marblehead, OH, US, 43440 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook East Harbor State Park features more than 10 miles of trails along the shoreline of Lake Erie. Your pups can walk along the beaches with you but are not permitted to swim. Waterfowl hunting is also available, if you train your dogs to hunt. You are able to reserve dog-friendly campsites if you’d like to stay the night. Smale Riverfront Park Located at: West Mehring Way, Cincinnati, OH, US, 45202 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook If you live in Cincinnati and are looking for a trail in the city, Smale Riverfront Park is a great option! Nestled along the Ohio River, the park trail has plenty of dog water fountains and poop cleanup stations for your convenience. If you’re looking for a longer hike, the park connects to the Ohio River Trail on either end. Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath Trail Located at: 4524 E 49th St, Cleveland, OH 44125 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Ohio & Erie Canal Towpath Trail is one of the longest dog-friendly trails in Ohio, measuring 101 miles long. It runs from the Canal Basin Park in Cleveland to the Canal Lands Park in New Philadelphia. You’ll enjoy any section of the trail with your pooch, but we recommend the section within the Ohio & Erie Canal Reservation. Rocky River Reservation Located at: 24000 Valley Pkwy, North Olmsted, OH, US, 44070 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The dog-friendly Rocky River Reservation trails wind through many beautiful sites, including shale cliffs, meadows, wetlands, and floodplain forests. You’ll need to keep your pooch leashed as there is plenty of wildlife around that they might chase after. There is horseback riding also available on some of the trails, so your dog might meet some friends during your hike. Hocking Hills State Park Located at: 19852 State Route 664 S, Logan, OH, US, 43138 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Hocking Hills State Park features plenty of hiking opportunities with your pup. You’ll see many natural features along the way, like cliffs, gorges, caves, and waterfalls. The best route in the park is along the Buckeye Trail from the Upper Falls to the Lower Falls. If you’re there late at night, you and your dog can stargaze at the John Glenn Astronomy Park within the state park. Gallant Woods Park Located at: 2151 Buttermilk Hill Rd, Delaware, OH, US, 43015 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Your leashed pup can hike with you throughout the Gallant Woods Park outside of Delaware, OH. This nature preserve has a couple of gravel trails with little elevation, making it great for people with handicaps or who otherwise find dirt trails difficult. Swan Creek Metropark Located at: 4659 Airport Hwy, Toledo, OH, US, 43614 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Swan Creek Metropark is an excellent preserve right within the city with plenty of dog-friendly trails along the creek. One unique feature of this park is its swinging bridge across Swan Creek. Most trails here are well-paved and flat, making them a great option for people with disabilities or who would otherwise have a difficult time on dirt trails. Marblehead Lighthouse State Park Located at: 110 Lighthouse Dr, Marblehead, OH, US, 43440 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Marblehead Lighthouse State Park offers beautiful views of Lake Erie and the namesake Marblehead Lighthouse along its dog-friendly trails. While your pooch can’t visit the lighthouse museum with you, there’s plenty to see outdoors. Your dog can cool off after your hike at the dog-friendly beach, too! Slippery Elm Trail Located at: 515 Sand Ridge Rd, Bowling Green, OH 43402 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Slippery Elm Trail in Bowling Green is a former railroad turned into a hiking trail with the help of the non-profit Rails-to-Trails Conservancy. It’s paved and well-shaded, making it a great destination for handicapped people. Chippewa Inlet Trail Located at: 6335 Wedgewood Road Medina, OH 44256 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Chippewa Inlet Trail in Medina is another former railroad turned into a hiking trail with the help of the non-profit Rails-to-Trails Conservancy. Along the path are groves of buckeyes and other wonderful foliage preserved in the adjacent Buckeye Woods Park. Some sections of the trail are paved while others are aggregate. Lester Rail Trail Located at: 3654 Lester Road Medina, OH 44256 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Yet another rail trail in Medina is the Lester Rail Trail. This trail was also created by the non-profit Rails-to-Trails Conservancy. If you have children, they’ll enjoy the miniature train rides available on select dates throughout the year. Most of the trail is through flat farmland and wetlands, where you’ll see some rare species of flowers. Sippo Valley Trail Located at: 2069 Skyland Ave NW, Massillon, OH 44647 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Sippo Valley Trail is also a rail trail created in part by the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy. Your dogs are welcome on a leash along the entire 10-mile trail. The trail is asphalt or limestone and relatively flat with wooden bridges crossing the West Sippo Creek at several places. The Sippo Valley Trail connects to the Towpath Trail mentioned above if you’d like to continue your adventure with your pup along more trails! Zoar Valley Trail Located at: 799 Park Ave SE, Bolivar, OH, US, 44612 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The Zoar Valley Trail is a historic, 20-mile trail for you and your dog to explore. It is managed by the Camp Tuscazoar Foundation, where you can make donations or book a reservation to support the upkeep of the trail. Along the route, you’ll come across the Dover Dam, decommissioned bridges, and other interesting historical sites. National Road Bikeway Located at: Reservoir Rd, St. Clairsville, OH, US, 43950 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook The National Road Bikeway is the only rail trail in Ohio to feature a tunnel. This rail trail was also created with the help of the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy. The restored tunnel is 532 feet long and 40 feet high with special lights that maintain a cave-like atmosphere. It is an enjoyable and unique experience to hike with your dog along this trail. Rowe Woods Located at: 4949 Tealtown Rd, Milford, OH, US, 45150 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Rowe Woods is an excellent nature preserve that features over 14 miles of dog-friendly hiking along trails of various difficulty. The woods are financed by memberships to the Cincinnati Nature Center. You’ll need a membership and to register your dogs before taking them to the park. If you’re traveling from out of town, you can pay an entry fee for just a day of visiting. Ash Cave Located at: 26400 OH-56, South Bloomingville, OH 43152 Visit Their Website Visit Their Facebook Ash Cave, located within Hocking Hills State Park, offers some great hiking opportunities and an iconic location to explore. There are several short but somewhat challenging trails in the park for those looking for exercise and an easier low trail that is handicap accessible. The namesake cave is a huge 700-foot-wide horseshoe-shaped cave with a waterfall cascading down 90 feet to a small pool.

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May 24, 2023

Newfoundlands: Kind-Hearted Working Dogs

Newfoundlands, also called Newfies and Newfts, have worked alongside fishermen and served as water rescue dogs for centuries. They are tenacious and brave while still being good-natured, patient, and mild-mannered. This breed’s large size is only rivaled by its great capacity to love. Breed History The Newfoundland breed is named after the place it originated, a Canadian island called Newfoundland. While we know this breed came from Newfoundland, there are different theories about why they came into existence. One of the most popular theories is that Newfoundlands are a result of Europeans breeding Great Pyrenees, Portuguese Water Dogs, and Mastiff breeds around the 1400s to 1500s. Newfoundland dogs were very popular among the fishermen of the island as they love the water, have great stamina, and are tough. The Newfoundland is known to be one of the hardest-working breeds in its class with incredible strength and endurance. This breed saw its popularity rise in the 1800s, leading to recognition by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1879. Today, the Newfoundland breed is believed to have played a part in the creation of our modern-day retrievers. Newfoundland Characteristics Appearance & Coat Newfoundlands are very large dogs, generally weighing between 110 to 155 pounds and standing around 25 to 28 inches tall. These are huge, muscular dogs with a lot of hair, floppy ears, and tails that hang either downward, straight out, or upright with a slight curve. They have coats that repel water and webbed paws that help them swim. Unfortunately, Newfoundlands are not hypoallergenic. These dogs have double coats that shed heavily and are coarse, thick, and slightly oily. Newfoundlands generally have completely black coats, although they can also be brown, white and black, or gray. White and black Newfoundlands are called “Landseers” after Sir Edward Landseer, an artist known for frequently incorporating black and white Newfoundlands in his art. Temperament Despite its large size, the Newfoundland is a very gentle and loyal dog that's a wonderful family pet. This breed’s sweet and kind-hearted nature makes it want to be friends with every human and animal it meets. Newfoundlands do very well with children and will be a happy and willing playmate. That being said, these dogs are devoted to those they love and will be protective of their families when needed. Health Newfoundlands generally live around 9 to 11 years. Similar to other extra-large breeds, the Newfoundland is susceptible to many health issues such as elbow and hip dysplasia, arthritis, obesity, and bloat. These dogs can also have heart defects, kidney problems, and bone cancer. You can reduce the risk of joint problems and arthritis in Newfoundlands by giving them exercise every day and not overfeeding them. You should only buy a Newfoundland from a responsible breeder that screens litters, dams, and studs for health problems before they breed or sell them. Caring for a Newfoundland The Newfoundland’s Ideal Home The Newfoundland is a companion breed that greatly prefers spending time with its family over being alone. Newfoundlands are ideal for households where family dogs are included in activities and someone is home frequently. Additionally, this breed will do well in a household with other dogs as it doesn’t need to be the leader of the pack. Because these dogs are social and enjoy being in the company of others, having other dogs in the same home can help prevent loneliness in this breed. Newfoundlands need plenty of space to freely roam, rest, and run around so apartment housing isn’t a good fit. A home with a fenced-in yard or a pool is perfect for providing your Newfoundland with enough room to comfortably play and exercise. Just remember to always supervise your dog any time it is around water. Training Best Practices Newfoundlands are smart dogs that enjoy being given a job to do. These characteristics can make training easier. When taking home a Newfoundland puppy, you need to begin socialization and training right away. Because these dogs are so large as adults and will be larger than other puppies their age, Newfoundlands need consistent training to ensure they, as well as those around them, are kept safe. Like other dogs, positive reinforcement such as praise, treats, and toys are much more effective when training your Newfie than scolding or punishing them. You want to build a trusting bond between you and your dog, not make them afraid of you. If you are unable to train your dog yourself, there are plenty of classes and experienced trainers that can help. By sticking to a regular routine and consistent training, your Newfoundland will be listening to commands in no time! Exercise Needs These working dogs need regular physical and mental exercise to keep them from becoming bored. If a Newfoundland isn’t given enough exercise or is left alone and becomes lonely, it can resort to destructive behaviors and uncontrolled barking. However, when they receive consistent attention and affection, you’ll find Newfoundlands to be well-mannered and calm. These dogs have medium energy levels, needing around 30 minutes to 1 hour of mild or moderate exercise each day. You can exercise your Newfoundland with short walks, swimming, playing in the yard, or a trip to the dog park. However, be mindful of the heat and humidity when taking your Newfoundland outdoors. Because this is a large breed with a double coat and tons of hair, your Newfoundland can easily overheat on hot days. Taking your Newfie to a professional groomer for a summer haircut can help keep them more cool and comfortable during the summertime. Grooming & Hygiene To keep your Newfoundland’s coat easy to manage, daily or weekly brushing is necessary. These dogs also need to be bathed at least once every 6 weeks, although some Newfoundland owners prefer giving baths on a more frequent basis. To easily remove your Newfie's loose hair you can bathe them, take them swimming, or let them run around outside where they can brush up against trees, bushes, and other outdoor vegetation. Does the Newfoundland sound like the perfect dog for your lifestyle and home? Browse Newfoundland puppies for sale near you. Not sure if the Newfoundland is your ideal pet? Discover more breeds with our breed spotlight blog series or guides for choosing a puppy.

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May 24, 2023

Questions Dog Breeders Ask Puppy Buyers

Breeders like to screen potential buyers to make sure their puppies are going to loving and caring homes where their needs will be met. Just like buyers want to make sure they’re buying from responsible and ethical breeders, breeders should ensure all potential homes are a good fit. So what questions can buyers expect and what questions should breeders ask? Keep reading to see our list of top questions that buyers are asked when interested in buying puppies. General Interest & Experience One of the first steps for breeders in screening potential buyers is gauging their interest and experience with dogs or other pets. This screening usually includes the following questions: Why do you want a dog? What drew you to this breed? Have you had a pet before? Have you owned a dog or puppy before? Dog breeders like to see how familiar potential buyers are with the breeds they’re interested in and if their expectations are realistic. Questions regarding a person’s interest in getting a dog are especially important around the holidays when it becomes popular to gift puppies. Sadly, puppies given as holiday gifts usually end up being surrendered to shelters when their families realize how much work they take. Breeders want to make sure their puppies are going to homes and families that will be committed to them their whole lives. Not having previously owned a dog or pet before isn’t a deal breaker for dog breeders. This question lets breeders know the level of experience families have with caring for dogs. This is even more important if a family is interested in a breed that is known for being difficult. Not all breeds are good fits for people who are first-time dog owners. Additionally, if there is high demand for a litter these questions help breeders choose the best possible owners for each puppy. Household Questions Most of the questions that dog breeders ask potential buyers will fall under the lifestyle and household categories. Examples of these questions include the following: Do you have kids? What are their ages? Have your kids been around dogs before? How do you plan to teach your kids the proper way to handle a dog? Do you currently have any other pets? What kinds of pets do you have and are they comfortable with other animals? How do you plan to introduce your new puppy to existing pets? Does anyone in your household have allergies? Where do you currently live? Do you rent or own? If you rent, does your landlord have any breed restrictions, weight limits, or pet rent fees? Do you have a fenced-in yard? If not, are you able to take your dog on daily walks or to dog parks? Kids and/or pets will be some of the biggest factors in determining if a puppy will fit in well with a new family. For example, dogs that were bred for hunting or have a high prey drive aren’t great additions to homes with small pets like cats and rabbits. If an interested buyer already has a dog or other pet that doesn’t get along well with other animals, it’s not safe for that family to add a new puppy to the mix. Additionally, adding a high-energy, large dog to a home with small children can lead to accidental injuries from kids mishandling the dog to kids getting knocked down when playing. The people and pets already living in a household need to be a top priority when deciding if a puppy and family will be a good match for each other. Furthermore, where someone lives also decides if someone should buy a puppy. For example, there are dogs that thrive in apartments and are adaptable to any living space, while other breeds need more room to run, bark, and play. Additionally, it’s not uncommon for apartment complexes and neighborhoods to have breed restrictions. These are all things that need to be discussed with interested buyers prior to taking home a dog. Don’t worry if you don’t have a fenced-in yard as this isn’t a requirement. That being said, families without fenced-in yards will need to take their dogs on daily leashed walks and/or frequent trips to dog parks. Potential buyers must be aware that many breeds are prone to chasing small animals and running off, so they cannot expect their dogs to stay close by without a leash. Any time they take their puppy outside, they will need to keep it on a leash. Awareness of Care Needs Questions used to gauge if a potential owner is prepared to take on the responsibility of owning a dog include the following: Who will be the main person responsible for the puppy? What will you do with your dog when you travel or go on vacation? Are you prepared for the costs of vet bills, food, supplies, toys, boarding, and grooming fees? Do you have the time for routine vet visits and trips to the groomer (if needed)? Do you have the time needed to train and care for a puppy? How do you plan to train the puppy? How often will someone be with the puppy? Will the puppy frequently be home alone? Potential owners should be aware that puppies require a lot of training. If they don’t have the time or ability to train their puppy, getting an older dog that has already been trained and socialized may be the better choice for them. Puppies are a lot of work and not all families will be able to give puppies the constant attention and time that they need. Additionally, many dogs aren’t good at being alone. Finding out how often someone will be home with the puppy can help decide if a family is able to meet the social and attention requirements of that particular breed. For example, someone who is away a lot on work trips or works long hours away from home won’t be a good fit for a breed with high attention needs and separation anxiety. While it may feel awkward, breeders generally ask potential buyers if they are prepared to financially care for a dog. Dogs have many costs, especially in their first year, that include vet bills, food, medicine, toys, supplies, etc. Specifics of finances don’t need to come up, dog breeders just want to know that research and knowledge have gone into a family’s decision to get a dog. Breeders want to ensure that potential owners are willing and able to care for their new pup like they would a family member. For more information on caring for puppies throughout their lifespan, check out our blog! You can also start listing puppies for sale today on Lancaster Puppies or browse new arrivals to find puppies available near you.

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May 24, 2023

5 Health Benefits of Owning a Dog

Almost any dog owner will tell you how getting a dog has changed their life for the better. Owning a dog will benefit you in many ways including socially, physically, and psychologically. When you’re caring for a dog, you’re also caring for yourself. Read on to learn more about the health benefits gained when you add a dog to your home. 1. Decreases Stress, Anxiety, & Cortisol Levels Simply being around a dog will help you reduce stress and anxiety. A 2019 study by Washington State University found lower levels of stress and anxiety in college students after petting dogs. According to this study, petting a dog for just 10 minutes can greatly reduce cortisol in humans, lowering overall stress and anxiety levels. Because dogs can help you calm down in times of anxiety and stress, you’ll be better at problem-solving and managing issues. Similarly, dogs have been found to lower agitation and increase cognitive abilities in elderly patients with dementia and Alzheimer’s. Many dog owners attest to their dogs’ humorous behaviors and personalities that make them laugh and smile. This is great news as just smiling or laughing is enough to boost our moods. Seeing your dog happy and in a good, silly mood is enough to increase your own levels of happiness. The care we give our dogs helps us reflect on the way we look after ourselves and if there is more self-care we can do. 2. Lowers Blood Pressure and Cholesterol As a result of lower stress levels, dog owners have healthier hearts and lower blood pressure readings. These great benefits don’t take long to kick in either. In just a few months, dog owners become less likely to suffer a heart attack or develop heart problems. With a healthier heart, your chances of living a longer life greatly increase. Additionally, walking a dog every day promotes weight loss. For people who are overweight or obese, this can have great health benefits such as lowered blood pressure and cholesterol. It’s also great for your mental health! Remember that owning a dog alone will not lower your blood pressure or help you live longer. The work and time put into caring for your dogs are responsible for these health benefits. 3. Keeps You Active Owning a dog means taking daily walks and helping your dog burn off energy. Generally, when you’re exercising your dog, you’re also exercising your own body. The frequent walks and play keep your body moving and breathing in fresh air. People who may feel too shy to exercise in public generally find they are more comfortable with a dog at their side, even if it’s just for a daily walk. Dogs also provide a sense of stability and routine due to their care schedule. Because dogs need to have daily walks and exercise to burn off energy, their owners must be consistent with exercise and staying active. While you may not think of it as exercise, walking your dog gets you into an active schedule every day. Plus, it’s much easier to stick to this habit because your dog depends on you to take them on walks to burn off energy. 4. Improves Social Life Just like helping us move more, dogs also keep us socially active. By leaving your house more often, you have a higher chance of meeting new people, especially if you have a dog that loves attention and making friends. People seem more approachable with dogs at their sides, leading others to feel more comfortable making conversation and being social. Dogs are great icebreakers for shy dog owners. From passing someone on the sidewalk while you’re walking your dog or taking frequent trips to your local dog park, you’ll gain more opportunities to speak with people. With your dog as the focus of attention, you can engage with someone else without feeling the pressure of leading the conversation. 5. Prevents Loneliness Often called “man’s best friend,” is it any surprise that dogs lessen feelings of loneliness in their owners? Reduced loneliness doesn’t just come from talking to people during daily dog walks, you’ll also be less lonely just from having a dog at home with you. Owning a dog or other pet cuts back on feelings of isolation and detachment from others while giving us a sense of purpose and belonging. This is especially true for people who live alone. Dogs are also good at sensing our emotions and giving comfort and additional companionship when needed. We talk to, play with, and cuddle our pets. All these things boost our feelings of connection and love. Owning a pet will also give you something to look forward to at the end of the day as your pet excitedly awaits your return. Want to begin your journey as a dog owner? Check out local puppies for sale on Lancaster Puppies to start looking for the perfect companion.

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May 24, 2023

Great Pyrenees: The Protective Companion

The Great Pyrenees is the perfect combination of being both calm and protective. This intelligent breed is self-assured and steadfast in its love for its family and job. Great Pyrenees are affectionate, cuddly giants whose tolerable and easygoing personalities do well in homes with children and other pets. Keep reading to learn more about these gentle guardians and why they are terrific sidekicks. Breed History The Great Pyrenees, also known as the Pyrenean Mountain Dog, has existed for centuries. Great Pyrenees were named after the Pyrenees Mountains where they acted as livestock guards and herding dogs for peasant shepherds. This breed has amazing patience and could sit and watch livestock for days to protect them against bears, wolves, and raiders. The cold temperatures and weather of the mountains didn’t faze this breed or hinder its endurance. With the Pyrenees Mountains standing between France and Spain, the Great Pyrenees soon became a favored breed among the French nobility and were used to guard royal estates and chateaux. In the late 1600s, King Louis XIV of France named the Great Pyrenees the “Royal Dog of France.” Great Pyrenees continued to grow in popularity throughout Europe in the 1800s among people of status, such as Queen Victoria of England. Around this time, these dogs also found their way to the United States when they were brought over by Marquis de Lafayette. In 1933, the well-liked Great Pyrenees became registered with the American Kennel Club (AKC). Great Pyrenees Characteristics Appearance & Coat The Great Pyrenees is a large dog that stands around 25 to 32 inches tall and weighs between 85 to 100 pounds. These dogs have ears that are feathered and hang down beside their eyes, as well as long, fluffy tails that can be plumed or relaxed. This massive breed is muscular and can deter threats with its size and appearance alone despite its peaceful demeanor. The Great Pyrenees has an outer coat that is long, wavy, and dense with a soft undercoat. These dogs have bold white coats that occasionally have gray or tan markings on their faces and/or tails. Sadly, this breed is not hypoallergenic as the Great Pyrenees sheds heavily throughout the year, with the most fur shed when seasons change. As a result, these dogs are poor fits for families with allergies. Temperament The Great Pyrenees has a wonderful temperament that’s patient and affectionate. This breed is a great family dog as it’s known to be gentle and tolerant of children, in addition to getting along well with other pets. While Great Pyrenees are loving and well-behaved, they tend to mistrust and be wary of strangers. Their caution around strangers makes them protective watchdogs that frequently bark to sound the alarm. If you’re looking for a devoted and loyal companion that can also be a guard dog, the Great Pyrenees may be your perfect match! Health The Great Pyrenees has a lifespan of 10 to 12 years. Similar to other large breeds, however, the Great Pyrenees has an array of health issues owners should be aware of. For example, Great Pyrenees are more prone to Osteosarcoma, which is a type of bone cancer. Thankfully there are treatments for Osteosarcoma like surgery, chemotherapy, and pain-relieving medications. In addition to cancer, Great Pyrenees are also susceptible to hip and elbow dysplasia, bloat, eye problems, luxating patellas, and immune-mediated diseases like Addison’s Disease. Great Pyrenees can also pass along neurological disorders to their litters, such as Neuronal Degeneration, so you should only buy this breed from reputable, ethical breeders that do thorough health checks. Caring for a Great Pyrenees The Great Pyrenees’ Ideal Home Great Pyrenees have been known to get along well with other pets such as dogs and cats. While this is generally the case, owners should be aware that this is dependent on their Great Pyrenees’ personality and socialization. Between its large size and barking tendencies, the Great Pyrenees is not a good fit for apartment living. This breed will greatly benefit from a home that has plenty of space for roaming and lounging. A house with a fenced-in backyard would be perfect for a Great Pyrenees, however, frequent inspection of the yard and fence is required to make sure this adventurous dog can’t escape. For example, when it snows make sure to shovel around your fence so your Great Pyrenees can’t stand on top of the snow and jump over the fence. Training Best Practices Great Pyrenees are intelligent and independent problem-solvers. These traits are great but can make this breed stubborn and difficult to train. The Great Pyrenees is a strong-willed dog that’s not a great fit for first-time dog owners. Training these dogs requires firmness and consistency. This breed will also need early and ongoing socialization to ensure they don’t become overprotective and aggressive. When training a Great Pyrenees, you will need to be confident and extremely patient as this breed may try to test you. Above all, being kind and staying positive during training will help your dog thrive as it learns it can trust you. Exercise Needs Great Pyrenees make wonderful adventure companions. These dogs will enjoy joining you on a hike or participating in family games to burn off energy. That being said, owners should always keep these dogs on a leash as they’re quick to wander off on their own. Owners can expect to give their Great Pyrenees daily walks that are around 30 minutes to 1 hour long. However, the Great Pyrenees is built for cold, freezing weather and should avoid hot temperatures that are 70 degrees Fahrenheit or above. Grooming & Hygiene Great Pyrenees shed a lot. These dogs will need to be brushed at least once a week throughout the year to collect loose fur. Owners of this breed can expect to clean up shed fur in their homes on a regular basis. In the spring, the Great Pyrenees will need to be brushed daily to keep up with its heavy seasonal shedding. While this breed has long and wavy fur that sheds a lot, the Great Pyrenees’ coat doesn’t require much cleaning. This breed has a coat that doesn’t tangle and is resistant to dirt. Because their coats stay so clean on their own, Great Pyrenees can be given baths on an as-needed basis. However, due to having floppy ears, you will need to check weekly for any signs of an ear infection. Like other breeds, regular nail trimming and teeth brushing are important to keep your dog comfortable and healthy. Interested in adding a Great Pyrenees to your family? Browse Great Pyrenees puppies for sale near you on Lancaster Puppies.

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May 24, 2023

Record Keeping for Dog Breeders

Keeping records related to dog breeding is important for ethical breeding, filing taxes, and documenting health history. Finding the best record-keeping process that works for you will keep your business running smoothly and help you stay organized with past and current litters. There are many options available for record-keeping, both online and offline. You can create your own record sheets or buy them online from places like Etsy, Chewy, and Amazon. You’ll definitely thank yourself for keeping each litter’s documentation organized once tax season rolls around! Pregnancy Records Record keeping for a litter begins when you start planning to breed a sire and dam. Start off with obtaining available records on the sire and dam being used so information about the parent dogs is on hand. You can pass some of this information along to puppy buyers, such as the sire and dam’s breed(s), club registration (if any), ages, names, and any other information you feel would be beneficial to add. Pregnancy information regarding each litter should include: When breeding took place Pregnancy start date (determined by a veterinarian) Expected due date The date puppies were actually born Number of puppies in the litter As we’ll discuss later, any vet visits during the pregnancy should be recorded and kept. These records should include the dam’s name, the date, what the appointment was for, and the amount paid. Puppy Identification Records Puppy identification records should be filled out soon after the puppies are born. These sheets are used to identify each puppy in the litter and won’t need additional information added as the puppies grow. You should include the following information for each puppy in a litter: Name or color ID The day and time it was born Gender Coat color and markings Weight at birth If you use color-coded puppy ID collars, be sure to add each puppy’s color ID to the identification sheet even if you give the puppies names. Litter Records It’s good to make notes of each puppy’s temperament and behavior. For example, some puppies are quiet and stand-offish while others may be domineering and hyperactive. These records are good for identifying puppies and helping families choose a puppy with an ideal temperament. However, this information is also good for determining changes in a puppy’s behavior that could indicate sickness. You may also find it helpful to keep track of what food and treats the litter has been given during their time living with you. You can pass this information along to buyers and let them know what the puppies are used to as well as what they like and dislike. Health Records   Keeping health records for each litter and dam is a must. Having these records on hand will be useful to vets, buyers, and yourself. You will need to track each puppy’s weight on a daily basis for the first 12 days after birth. Once you reach the 12-day mark, you’ll switch to weekly weight tracking. A decrease or no change in weight are both signs that something might be wrong. Keeping records of each puppy’s weight in a litter will help you detect health issues early on. Plus, you can see when the changes in weight started which is valuable information when a dog is sick. The following records should be included if applicable: Vaccinations (Rabies, Parvovirus, Distemper, etc) Surgeries (Spay, Neuter, etc) Deworming Microchip information Health check-ups Similarly, any time the dam or puppies are given medication or supplements, keep track of what was given, how much was given, and the date and time it was administered. Tax Records For tax reasons you’ll want to keep track of every purchase and sale you make. If you add a lot of deductions to your taxes, you can trigger an audit where you’ll need to be able to prove that everything you included is legitimate. In order to add necessary dog expenses as tax write-offs, like ID collars, dog supplies, whelping boxes, and other essential items, you need to keep receipts in your records. You also need to keep track of every sale you make. When you sell a puppy you should document the following information: Date sold Puppy’s name Buyer’s name Buyer’s contact information Your name Amount sold for Likewise, if you are delivering a puppy to someone or traveling for a puppy introduction, keep track of how many miles you drove and any gas receipts from along the way. Start listing your litters for sale on Lancaster Puppies to connect with families looking for puppies across the US. For more articles about dog breeding, browse Lancaster Puppies’ blog to discover new posts every month.

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May 24, 2023

Overheating in Dogs: Is it Too Hot for Your Dog to Be Outside?

Summer is a great time to be outside. From swimming and hiking to lounging outdoors in the sun, there are endless activities to do in the summertime. With all the opportunities to get outside and enjoy the outdoors with your dog, it’s important to keep your pup comfortable and safe in the heat. Keep reading to know when temperatures are too hot for your dog, learn the signs of canine overheating, and get tips for keeping your dog cool throughout the summer. Signs It’s Too Hot For Your Dog Dogs don’t have the ability to sweat, making them highly prone to overheating and heat exhaustion. Because they can’t sweat, dogs cool themselves down by panting which helps release the hot air inside them. This is why dogs need access to plenty of cold water on hot days to keep them cool and hydrated. High Temperatures & Humidity Days with high temperatures and humidity are especially bad for dogs as humidity can make it harder for dogs to cool themselves down through panting. The risk of heatstroke becomes higher once temperatures hit 80 degrees Fahrenheit or 90% humidity. Even if your dog is just lying in the sun, they can overheat resting outside on a hot day. If you’re sweating from the heat, it’s usually too hot for your dog to be outside. Dogs have a higher body temperature than humans, so if the day is too hot for you it’s definitely too hot for your dog. Sidewalk and Pavement Are Too Hot Even if the day is a bit cooler, the sun can still make the ground too hot for your dog’s paws. Pavement and sidewalks hold heat and are generally significantly hotter than the air’s temperature. If the ground is too hot for you to touch for 5 seconds, it’s too hot for your dog to walk on. In the summer months, the safest time to walk and exercise your dog is in the early morning and early evening. You can also avoid pavement and sidewalks, keeping your dog on grass or dirt to prevent their paws from being burned. Additionally, products like dog boots and shoes keep your dog’s paws safe and comfortable when walking outside in hot or cold temperatures. Symptoms of Overheating & Heat Exhaustion in Dogs When your dog is overheating you’ll notice a significant increase in panting and drooling. As soon as this happens, you need to take time to cool down your dog and give them cold water.  Some serious signs your dog is overheating include: Excessive panting Gray and purple mouth Vivid red tongue and gums Foaming mouth Vomiting Diarrhea Trouble standing Losing consciousness Seizures Your dog does not need to be showing all of these symptoms to be overheating. It’s vital to take action at the first sign of overheating in your dog, cooling them down immediately. If symptoms become more serious, you should take your dog to a vet as soon as possible. Even if your dog seems to be recovering, it’s important to make sure no damage was done when they were overheating. If action isn’t taken and your dog’s symptoms get worse, death can occur. Dogs at an Increased Risk of Overheating Dogs that are old, very young, obese, or have health conditions like kidney or heart problems are very susceptible to heatstroke and overheating. Additionally, dogs with double coats or dark-colored coats can easily overheat in hot weather as their coats absorb more heat and sun. That being said, you shouldn’t shave your double-coated dog. Dogs with double coats naturally shed their undercoats in preparation for summer. Their coats help regulate airflow and body temperature, so by shaving their coats, temperatures will be even hotter for them and lead to sunburn. Families with dogs that have flat faces, also called brachycephalic breeds, need to be especially vigilant in preventing overheating and dehydration. Flat-faced dogs frequently have breathing problems because of their pushed-in faces. These breathing problems make brachycephalic breeds highly prone to overheating as they struggle with regulating their temperatures on their own. Brachycephalic breeds include the following: Affenpinschers American Bulldogs Boston Terriers Boxers Brussels Griffons Bullmastiffs Cavalier King Charles Spaniels Chow Chows English Bulldogs French Bulldogs Japanese Chins Lhasa Apsos Pugs Pekingese Shih-Tzus Because dogs pant to cool themselves down on hot days, flat-faced breeds have to breathe harder to get the same relief, causing them to tire out faster and make breathing more difficult. Small and medium dogs that don’t fall under the brachycephalic category are less prone to heatstroke and overheating than large dogs. Keep in mind though that no matter the size of a dog, the pavement and sidewalks can still burn its paws in around a minute when temperatures are high. Exercising Your Dog in Hot Weather Dogs shouldn’t be exercised on hot days, no matter how athletic or active they are. It’s best to avoid exercising your dog outside when the temperature is 77 degrees Fahrenheit or above. When it’s hot outside, it’s recommended that your dog burn off energy indoors or by participating in water activities in the shade. If you must take your dog out on hot days, you’ll want to keep ice, freezer packs, and spray bottles easily accessible to help cool your dog down. Remember to always have cool water on hand for your dog and plenty of shade available for resting and refreshing. Keep Your Home Cool Just because a dog is indoors doesn’t mean it can’t overheat. Your home still needs to be kept cool and air-conditioned. Losing power in the summer can lead to tragedy if you aren’t prepared. On very hot days try to check in when you’re not home to make sure your air conditioning is working properly and your dog is comfortable. You can do this through a neighbor, smart home system, or home camera. Tips for Keeping Your Dog Cool   There are many fun and creative ways to keep your dog cool and comfortable during the summer. You can help ease the heat with the following: Pools & Sprinklers - Let your dog splash around in a kiddie pool, dog pool, or sprinkler. Just remember to keep these activities in a grassy, shaded area so the water and your dog stay cool. Wet Towels & Fans - Make a towel wet, wrap the towel around your dog, and place a fan to blow on your dog. Cooling Mats “Pupsicles” In hot weather, always make sure your dog is supervised at all times to ensure they are safe and not at risk of overheating. For more advice on living with and caring for dogs, check out our blog and subscribe to our newsletter to get monthly dog-lover tips sent straight to your inbox. Looking for an adventure buddy this summer? Check out new puppy arrivals on Lancaster Puppies to find your new best friend.

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May 24, 2023

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel: A Gentle & Adaptable Breed

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is an affectionate companion dog to families and individuals of all ages. These dogs are popular for their beautiful, silky coats and cheerful temperaments. Keep reading to learn more about this adaptable breed that blends well with any home no matter the size. Breed History Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are linked to toy spaniels that have existed since the Renaissance. This breed has also been called the Blenheim Cavalier, King Charles Spaniel, and Cavalier. In the 17th century, toy spaniels became popular lapdogs among Europe’s upper class and nobles. King Charles I and Charles II both took a special interest in black and tan toy spaniels and eventually became the Cavalier’s namesake. As continued breeding and interest in toy spaniels further developed this breed, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel that we know today emerged in the early 1900s. This breed finally arrived in the United States in 1952 and was registered with the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1996, becoming the 140th breed to be registered with the AKC. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Characteristics Appearance & Coat Cavalier King Charles Spaniels have a delicate and regal appearance. These dogs are part of the toy group, weighing between 13 to 18 pounds and standing around 12 to 13 inches tall. Cavaliers have big brown eyes, rounded heads, feathered ears that hang down, short muzzles, and long, feathered tails. Cavaliers have silky coats that come in 4 different colorings. This breed can be red and white, black with white and tan markings, black with tan markings, and all red. Even though they are small and have silky coats, Cavaliers shed moderately throughout the year. Because they are moderate-shedders, these dogs are not hypoallergenic and not a good fit for people with pet dander allergies. Temperament The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is playful but not overly energetic. These gentle and affectionate dogs are perfect for owners who want a breed that is calm and low-key but still enjoys playing with its family. Cavaliers are perfectly content to snuggle up with their owners on the couch after enjoying a good game of fetch. These dogs are known for being very friendly and approachable with everyone they meet, always wanting to befriend people and animals. Health The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel has a long lifespan, usually around 13 to 18 years. Despite having a long lifespan, this breed is susceptible to various health problems. These dogs tend to be prone to hip dysplasia, patella luxation, syringomyelia, heart conditions, eye problems, middle ear infections, and idiopathic asymptomatic thrombocytopenia. Regularly taking your Cavalier to the vet can help prevent, manage, and treat these conditions. Staying consistent with vet check-ups is key to keeping your Cavalier healthy and feeling good. Caring for a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel The Cavalier’s Ideal Home Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are adaptable dogs that can live in many different homes and environments. Dog lovers looking for a breed that can live in an apartment should turn their focus to the quiet and easygoing Cavalier. This dog will blend well in almost any household from families with kids to elderly owners. Cavaliers need owners who will be present and very affectionate with them. These are social dogs that love spending time with people and other animals. They’d do very well in a house with other pets, including cats, that can keep them company. Families who are rarely home and don’t have any other pets are not a great fit for Cavaliers as they require consistent attention and affection. Training Best Practices Cavalier King Charles Spaniels aren’t difficult to train as they’re obedient and love to please people. Cavaliers respond well to praise and treats as rewards for good behavior. Like all dog breeds, socializing your Cavalier from a young age is important for future self-control and good behavior. By gradually introducing your puppy to family, friends, pets, public places, and strangers, your Cavalier will be better adjusted to handling new people and experiences when they are adults. Exercise Needs While this breed is lowkey, it still needs daily walks as well as time to run and play in a fenced-in area. Cavaliers should be given around 1 hour of exercise a day. Ways to exercise your Cavalier can include walks, trips to the dog park, canine sports, and play. These dogs are especially good at agility training. Training your Cavalier to compete in agility competitions is another great way to get exercise in and further improve their abilities. While Cavaliers can greatly benefit from having a fenced-in area where they can run around and play off-leash, families don’t need to have a yard to own a Cavalier. These dogs will be perfectly happy with daily walks and trips to the dog park. However, owners should be aware that Cavaliers aren’t dogs that do well off-leash. Their spaniel-hunting instincts make them high-flight risk so they should only be off-leash if they are in a safe, fenced-in area. Grooming & Hygiene The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a naturally clean dog that only needs a bath when it gets dirty. These dogs love to be brushed, so brushing them a few times a week will help collect loose fur and keep their coats healthy. The feathering on this breed’s coat will need a bit of extra care, frequently being combed through to stay tangle-free. Like other dogs, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels will need to have their teeth brushed, nails trimmed, and ears cleaned regularly. Does the Cavalier sound like the perfect addition to your home? Check out Cavalier King Charles Spaniel puppy listings on Lancaster Puppies to find Cavalier puppies near you.

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May 24, 2023

10 Best Dog Breeds for Families with Kids

Adding a dog to your family is a big choice with many options. To simplify your search and find a breed that meshes well with your family, make a list ahead of time to distinguish which breed traits are most important to you. Do you want a dog with high energy who can join you on family walks and hikes? Or a breed with low energy that prefers being a lap dog? Will a highly active dog have too much energy for your young children? Do your kids want a dog they can play games with and teach new tricks? Answering these questions will help you find a dog that’s a perfect match for your unique family. It’s important to teach your children how to act around dogs, no matter how gentle or patient a dog may be. This can be a great way to teach your child about mutual respect and boundaries. Thankfully, these breeds make that process easier with their easygoing personalities and sweet natures. Keep reading to see our list of the best dog breeds for families with kids. Small Breeds Pug Pugs are outgoing and social dogs that love spending time with people and other animals. These dogs have a low energy level but are still playful, fun-loving, and enjoy taking walks. Kids shouldn’t have any trouble walking a Pug because of its calm and lowkey temperament. In fact, Pugs are perfectly content to cuddle up on a family member’s lap while they watch TV. These little dogs stand around 10 to 12 inches tall and weigh between 14 to 18 pounds. This breed's laid-back personality and small size make it a great companion for kids and apartment living. Despite their small size, these dogs are still quite dense and hardy. Pugs generally live around 10 to 15 years and are little clowns that love to make their families laugh. However, Pugs tend to be susceptible to many health conditions so families wanting to take home a Pug should choose reputable breeders that screen their dogs for health problems. If you’re looking for a low-energy dog that’s still upbeat, the Pug may be the breed for you. Cavachon The Cavachon is a designer dog that’s a mix between a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and a Bichon Frise. These dogs have also gone by the names Bichalier and Cavashon. This small breed stands around 9 to 18 inches tall, is usually between 12 to 25 pounds, and has a long lifespan of around 13 to 18 years. Cavachons are social butterflies that want to be friends with every person and animal they meet. This trait makes the Cavachon ideal for families that have other pets. Friendly, gentle, and affectionate, the Cavachon is a great companion and gets along well with children. These dogs are intelligent and easy to train, whether they’re learning new tricks from kids or basic commands from novice dog owners. Cavachons are adaptable to many living situations, including apartment living. They have a moderate energy level that doesn’t require an excess of exercise. Daily walks and play are generally all that’s needed to help this breed burn off energy. Best of all, these are cuddly dogs that enjoy relaxing alongside their families. Cockapoo Also called the Cockadoodle, Cockerdoodle, and Spoodle, the Cockapoo is a designer breed that’s a mix between a Cocker Spaniel and a Poodle. This popular breed has a long lifespan of around 13 to 16 years. The Cockapoo is widely adored for its loving, sweet, and outgoing personality. These dogs are also great with other animals and will blend well with families that already have pets.  A small but playful breed, the Cockapoo stands around 10 to 15 inches tall and weighs between 10 to 30 pounds. Cockapoos are intelligent people pleasers which makes them obedient and easy to train. This breed will have a blast spending time with kids whether they’re being taught new tricks or playing outside. Cockapoos will love having a fenced-in area to run around but are also fine with daily walks and lots of play. These dogs are affectionate companions who want to be with their families as much as possible. Breeds with Multiple Sizes Goldendoodle The Goldendoodle, also known as the Groodle, Curly Golden, and Goldenpoo, is a mix between a Golden Retriever and a Poodle. Goldendoodles generally live around 10 to 15 years and can come in different sizes. Miniature Goldendoodles are usually around 13 to 20 inches tall and between 15 to 40 pounds. The larger Standard Goldendoodle tends to be around 20 to 24 inches tall and weighs between 50 to 90 pounds. The Goldendoodle gets the best from both parent breeds: the Poodle’s intelligence and the Golden Retriever’s happy-go-lucky personality. Goldendoodles are gentle and very affectionate, while also being social dogs that want to befriend every person and animal they meet. This breed prefers to spend time with other people and dogs over being left alone, making a wonderful addition to families that have other pets. Kids who want a dog that can be taught tricks will love the Goldendoodle’s desire to learn new things. This breed’s intelligence, people-pleasing personality, and love for treats make the Goldendoodle easy to train. These dogs have high energy levels and will need plenty of exercise, enjoying fun activities like swimming, running, playing fetch, taking walks, and hiking. The Golden Retriever is an ideal breed for families who are active and enjoy spending time outdoors. Bernedoodle The Bernedoodle is a designer breed that’s a mix between a Bernese Mountain Dog and a Poodle. These dogs have also been called the Bernepoo, Bernesepoo, and Bernesedoodle. Like other designer breeds, Bernedoodles come in different sizes. The Miniature Bernedoodle tends to fall between 25 to 50 pounds and stands around 15 to 22 inches tall. The Standard Berndoodle is large, weighing between 50 to 90 pounds and standing around 22 to 29 inches tall. Bernedoodles have all the wonderful, sweet personality traits of the Bernese Mountain Dog with the Poodle's additional intelligence and longer lifespan of 12 to 18 years. This breed is definitely a companion dog that makes the perfect family pet as they’re very loyal and extra-loving with their owners. Not only are these dogs great with kids and other dogs, but they also have no problem living with smaller pets like cats and birds. Bernedoodles are great for families looking for active dogs that enjoy playing outdoors but are also laid back. While it still needs daily walks, play, and exercise, the Bernedoodle will be content to snuggle up next to you on the couch after burning off its energy. Labradoodle The Labradoodle, a mix between a Labrador Retriever and a Poodle, has also been called the Labrapoo, Labrapoodle, and Labradorpoo. Labradoodles are most commonly miniature or standard-sized. Miniature Labradoodles tend to weigh between 10 to 30 pounds and stand around 14 to 20 inches tall. Standard Labradoodles are larger at around 20 to 24 inches tall and between 45 to 60 pounds. When healthy, this breed can live around 11 to 14 years. Labradoodles do well with kids of all ages and other dogs. Training a Labradoodle isn’t too hard of a task since this breed is intelligent and loves to please people. This makes this breed ideal for kids who want a dog that can be taught tricks. This breed is highly playful and loves spending time with its family. Labradoodles can burn energy through playing, going for walks, running around in fenced-in areas, and hiking. The Labradoodle is perfect for a family who wants a dog they can run and play with but also snuggle up with at the end of the day. Large Breeds Golden Retriever The Golden Retriever is one of the most popular family dogs. These cheerful, sunny dogs brighten every room they enter and want to be friends with everyone. Golden Retrievers are large dogs that tend to fall between 55 to 75 pounds and stand around 20 to 25 inches tall. This breed usually lives to be around 12 to 13 years old. Golden Retrievers are athletic dogs that have gentle temperaments. You can expect your Golden Retriever to need no less than 1 hour of exercise each day. Some great forms of exercising your Golden Retriever include walks, playing fetch, teaching new tricks, swimming, jogging, biking, and hiking. Golden Retrievers are also great for novice owners and families who’ve never owned a dog before. These dogs are social and easy to train as they aim to make their families happy. They make perfect family dogs with their gentle and wholesome nature. They love playing with kids and get along well with other family pets. Families with cats or other dogs may find the Golden Retriever to be the perfect addition. Labrador Retriever For over 3 decades, the Labrador Retriever has been at the top of the American Kennel Club’s (AKC) list of most popular dog breeds. The Labrador Retriever is one of the most beloved family dogs and continues to prove just how perfect this breed is for families of all life stages with a typical lifespan of 10 to 14 years. Labradors are large dogs that weigh between 55 to 90 pounds and stand around 21 to 23 inches tall. This breed needs around 1 hour of exercise daily and generally enjoys walking, jogging, hiking, swimming, and playing fetch. Labrador Retrievers are generally used as service dogs because they have fantastic temperaments. These dogs are gentle, easygoing, and very loving while also being very social, taking every opportunity to befriend new people and dogs. Families who’ve never owned a dog before should consider the Labrador Retriever as it’s easy to train and a good fit for novice owners. Irish Setter Irish Setters, also called Irish Red Setters and Red Setters, are wonderful family dogs that are both energetic and calm. Active families will enjoy that this breed is very athletic and intelligent while still being gentle and easygoing. Furthermore, these dogs are devoted and loving family companions. They’re also quite outgoing and thrive on attention from others. These large dogs generally stand around 24 to 27 inches tall and weigh between 50 to 70 pounds. Families will be happy to know that healthy Irish Setters generally live around 11 to 15 years. Irish Setters are usually best suited for families with older children. This is because this dog’s large size and high energy level could lead to it accidentally knocking over young children when playing. Additionally, Irish Setters get along well with other dogs and can live with smaller pets like rabbits and cats if they’ve been raised with them and socialized early on. However, because this is a hunting dog, families with smaller pets may find another breed to be a better fit. Active families that already have dogs but are looking to add another will love Irish Setters. Newfoundland The Newfoundland’s addition to this list may be surprising to some because of its large size. Also called Newfies and Newfs, Newfoundlands are gentle giants that are great with kids and other pets, including cats! The largest dog included on this list, the Newfoundland generally weighs between 110 to 155 pounds and stands around 25 to 28 inches tall. Unfortunately, like other large breeds, the Newfoundland has a rather short lifespan of 9 to 11 years. Newfoundlands are very friendly and sweet. While they mesh well with people and animals, this breed can be protective when it needs to be. Newfoundlands love spending time with their families and need a home that can give them plenty of attention and involvement in activities. As one would expect, Newfoundlands need lots of space to run, play, and roam. Plus, these dogs have a love for swimming in their DNA! Families with fenced-in outdoor areas are better fits for Newfies than families that live in apartments.   Ready to search for your family’s newest addition? Browse new arrivals on Lancaster Puppies.

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May 24, 2023

Goldendoodles: Intelligent Dogs with Hearts of Gold

A great breed for many types of households and families, the Goldendoodle is a friendly, sweet-natured, gentle dog that loves spending time with people and other pets. These cheerful dogs are athletic without being hyperactive, intelligent without being aloof, and playful without being aggressive. Keep reading to learn more about this widely popular designer breed. Breed History The Goldendoodle, also known as the Curly Golden, the Goldenpoo, and the Groodle, is a popular designer dog that’s a mix between a Poodle and a Golden Retriever. This dog is a newer designer breed that came into existence in the 1990s after Cockapoos and Labradoodles jumped in popularity. Goldendoodles were bred in hopes of creating a dog that has the low-shedding coat of the Poodle and the good-natured temperament of the Golden Retriever. This beloved breed, which has been added to many designer and hybrid registries, has many dedicated groups such as the Goldendoodle Association of North America (GANA) and the Goldendoodle Registry (TGR). Goldendoodle Characteristics Appearance & Coat Goldendoodles have long tails, shaggy coats, and ears that hang down. This breed can be standard-sized or mini-sized. Standard-sized Goldendoodles are generally around 20 to 24 inches tall and between 50 to 90 pounds while Mini Goldendoodles tend to be 13 to 20 inches tall and between 15 to 40 pounds. Goldendoodles that inherit the Poodle’s curly coat are considered hypoallergenic and shed very little. The curlier a Goldendoodle’s coat, the less it will shed. This makes a curly-coated Goldendoodle a better fit for households with allergies over its straight or wavy-coated counterparts. Like other designer breeds with Poodle parentage, Goldendoodles can be many colors. The most common Goldendoodle colors are brown and cream, but this breed can also be black, red, white, gray, apricot, or multi-colored. Temperament Goldendoodles have wonderful temperaments that make them great family dogs. This breed loves playing with kids and other pets. This perfect family addition will bring extra love, playfulness, and happiness to your home. The always lively Goldendoodle loves people and is highly affectionate, wanting to be friends with everyone it meets. Because they’re so friendly, Goldendoodles don’t make great guard dogs. Health Because the Goldendoodle is a mixed breed, there are certain health conditions owners should be aware of and make sure breeders screen for. These conditions include hip dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy, hereditary cancer, atopic dermatitis, patellar luxation, seizures, and von Willebrand’s disease. While there are various health concerns owners should watch for, the Goldendoodle is generally a healthy breed and has an average lifespan of 10 to 15 years. You can keep your dog healthy with regular vet visits to help prevent, treat, and catch health concerns early on. Caring for a Goldendoodle The Goldendoodle’s Ideal Home An ideal home for a Goldendoodle would be a family or individual who can spend a lot of time with their dog. This breed thrives when it can be around its loved ones and doesn’t like to be frequently left home alone. This social breed needs people and other dogs to keep it company. For owners who travel and cannot take their Goldendoodles with them, boarding their dogs where they will receive lots of attention and playtime is ideal. These dogs also do extremely well at doggy daycares, a great option for owners who work full-time away from home. Goldendoodles are also best suited for active households that can meet this breed’s exercise requirements. These dogs have high energy levels that need to be met daily and will be happiest in homes where they can burn off energy and get lots of exercise. If you’re looking for an active and lively workout buddy, the Goldendoodle is a perfect fit. Training Best Practices Goldendoodles are generally easy to train as they have a working background. These dogs like having a job to complete and enjoy learning new things. The best method to train a Goldendoodle is by rewarding its behavior with treats and other dog-friendly foods. This breed is known for being extremely friendly and loves to make its owners happy. Because Goldendoodles are people-pleasers, this breed is generally obedient and easy to train. Along with their well-behaved and easy-to-train behavior, Goldendoodles have calm and affectionate personalities that make them fantastic service dogs. Likewise, their intelligence, gentleness, and sweet nature continue to help them grow in popularity as ideal service dogs. Through the years, Goldendoodles have been guide dogs, emotional support dogs, therapy dogs, medical alert dogs, and many other types of service dogs. Exercise Needs While their working background makes Goldendoodles easy to train, this background also gives them high energy and a need to be mentally stimulated to avoid boredom. If Goldendoodles are not given plenty of physical and mental exercise every day they may begin to destroy things as a way to release energy. These athletic dogs need at least 1 hour of exercise every day. Their daily exercise can be in the form of walks, jogs, hikes, trips to the dog park, learning new tricks, dog sports, running around a fenced-in area, and playing games like fetch. Additionally, Poodles were bred to retrieve waterfowl and spend lots of time in the water. This trait is frequently passed down to Goldendoodles who generally love water and swimming. While not all Goldendoodles will be ecstatic about the chance to swim, many of these dogs will enjoy burning off energy through swimming. Grooming & Hygiene Despite curly-coated Goldendoodles being light shedders, their coats are higher maintenance than those that have straight or wavy coats. Goldendoodles with curly coats need to be brushed daily to prevent matting and keep their coats tangle-free. Goldendoodles with wavy or straight coats can be brushed once a week. To avoid drying out your Goldendoodle’s coat this breed should only be bathed when necessary. Overbathing will reduce the oils in your dog’s coat that keep it healthy and can dry out its skin as well. Owners with curly-coated Goldendoodles should get them professionally trimmed on a regular basis to keep their coats from becoming overgrown and matted. Wavy or straight-coated Goldendoodles don’t need trims as frequently, but will still benefit from one occasionally. All Goldendoodles need to have their ears checked and cleaned out regularly to remove any built-up earwax and avoid ear infections. Like other breeds, to keep your Goldendoodle comfortable and healthy, regularly brush its teeth and clip its nails. Does the Goldendoodle sound like your ideal pet? Check out Goldendoodle puppies on Lancaster Puppies to find your new best friend.

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May 24, 2023

How to Prepare for Your Dog's Springtime Allergies

When we think of springtime our minds often go straight to flowers blooming, the snow being washed away by spring rain, and the vibrant colors that replace the gray winter. For some of us, our minds go to a much more negative place, seasonal allergies. What many dog owners may not be aware of is that many dogs also suffer seasonal allergies that can lead to more serious conditions and infections. Today we are going to take a look at how to diagnose seasonal allergies in your pup and the best way to treat them to avoid more serious conditions or infections. How to Recognize Allergies in Your Dog Seasonal allergy symptoms in dogs are very similar to humans, with an emphasis on skin itching and irritation. If you notice your dog is itching more often than normal or if their skin is becoming irritated during spring months, your dog may be suffering from seasonal allergies. Itching and irritation can either be isolated to one area, most commonly their ears or paws, or can affect their whole body. In medical terms, your dog is suffering from Atopic Dermatitis. This occurs when a dog’s immune system overreacts to an allergen that enters the skin and causes irritation. This irritation can cause your dog to itch, chew, lick, and scratch incessantly, which can lead to infection.  It is important to identify these symptoms early on to avoid severe ear or skin infections that could lead to more serious health issues. If you suspect your dog is suffering from Atopic Dermatitis due to an allergic reaction we recommend scheduling a vet appointment immediately. Top Seasonal Allergens for Dogs Seasonal allergies in dogs occur because they come in contact with something that their nervous system isn’t equipped to handle. Like humans, seasonal allergies in dogs occur most commonly in spring when tree pollen and fresh grass become more prevalent. Dogs can also be affected by things in the house like dust, dust mites, and mold. How to Manage Your Dog’s Seasonal Allergies There are multiple ways to treat your dog’s seasonal allergy symptoms depending on the severity and duration of the effects. Skin Care and Shampoo If your dog’s symptoms are minor, we recommend wiping down irritated areas with a wet cloth to remove allergens from their coat and skin. You can also bathe your dog with a hypoallergenic shampoo that is formulated to soothe sensitive and inflamed skin. There are great over-the-counter shampoos, but your vet may recommend prescription shampoo if your dog’s allergies are severe. Antihistamines  If your dog's allergies aren’t resolved by cleaning and shampooing their coat and skin your dog may require medication to thrive during seasonal allergy flare-ups. Again, the medications used can depend on the severity of your dog’s symptoms. Antihistamines like Diphenhydramine, Chlorpheniramine, and Hydroxyzine are great at treating mild symptoms and may be all your dog needs to feel its best. Hyposensitization/Desensitization If you have tried skincare and antihistamines and your dog is still suffering from seasonal allergies, you can also try hyposensitization therapy. This process involves gradually introducing allergens to your dog’s system to improve its immune system in hopes that it will no longer experience allergy symptoms. This can be an involved process and we recommend a serious dialogue with your vet to see if this is right for you and your pup. Most dog allergy symptoms are minor, and if you follow the steps above your dog will be able to happily enjoy the springtime weather with you and your family. If your dog’s allergy symptoms go beyond atopic dermatitis and you are concerned for their well-being get your dog to an emergency vet hospital as soon as possible. If you’re looking for springtime activities with your pup check out our recent blogs on the Best Dog-Friendly Hiking Trails in Pennsylvania and the Best Dog Parks in Ohio, or browse puppies online to find your next furry friend.

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May 24, 2023

The Best Dog Parks in Ohio

Dog parks are an excellent way to get outside, exercise your pup, and socialize with other dog owners. They typically feature a large, fenced-in, grassy area where you can let your dog off its leash to run around and play with other dogs. Some will have multiple enclosures for different sizes of dogs and some will have equipment to play with, like tunnels & ramps. If you’re new to Ohio or recently adopted a new puppy, here are our picks for the best dog parks in the Buckeye State. Bow Wow Beach Located at: 5027 Stow Rd, Stow, OH, US, 44224 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Bow Wow Beach is a 7.5-acre dog park with a fun 3-acre lake in the middle. Surrounding the lake is a sandy beach and there are grassy knolls and trees around the exterior. There is a separate area for small dogs, as well. The park is managed by the City of Stow’s Parks and Recreation Department and is open to the public from mid-March through November, 8 am to sunset. Montgomery County Bark Park Located at: 6794 Webster St, Dayton, OH, US, 45414 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Montgomery County Bark Park is an over 6-acre dog park next to the county Animal Resource Center. The park is mostly a grassy hill with agility equipment, a few pavilions, and picnic tables for you to rest while your dog runs around. There is handicap access and paved paths for those with disabilities to take advantage of. The park is run by the Montgomery County Parks & Grounds. Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park Located at: 4985 Windfall Rd, Medina, OH, US, 44256 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The off-leash dog park located at Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park has over 7 acres of turf play areas, wooded walking trails, and a pond for dogs to swim in. This fenced-in dog park also includes a separate area for small dogs to play in. The park is open to the public and operated by the Medina County Park District. Alum Creek Dog Park Located at: 3615 S Old State Rd, Delaware, OH, US, 43015 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Alum Creek Dog Park is a fenced-in off-leash dog park within the Alum Creek State Park. This free park is 4 acres with areas for small and large dogs, both sides include shade trees, benches, and access to a dog beach at the lake. The park was built by a non-profit, Friends of Alum Creek Dog Park, in conjunction with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources state parks department and is maintained by volunteers of the non-profit. Consider donating or volunteering your time to help! Otto Armleder Dog Park Located at: 5057 Wooster Pike, Cincinnati, OH, US, 45226 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Otto Armleder Park is a 305-acre park with 10 acres of fenced-in dog park. With plenty of trails, you can walk your dog on a leash or take them to the fenced-in area for off-leash fun. There are separate areas for small and large breeds. There are shade trees & doggy water fountains to cool off and even a dog shower in case your pup gets a bit dirty. The park is open to the public and operated by a joint venture between the Great Parks of Hamilton County, Cincinnati Recreation Commission, and Cincinnati Park Board. Prairie Oaks Dog Park Located at: 3225 NE Plain City-Georgesville Rd, West Jefferson, OH, US, 43026 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Prairie Oaks Metro Park is home to many miles of on-leash trails and a partially fenced off-leash beach for pups to run around and swim. The beach includes a fun dock to jump off of. They host an annual festival known as Wagfest, so be sure to check that out! Prairie Oaks is open to the public and operated by the Columbus and Franklin County Metro Parks.  Scioto Audubon Dog Park Located at: 400 W Whittier St, Columbus, OH, US, 43215 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Scioto Audubon Park in Columbus features 1.5 acres of fenced-in artificial turf for your pups to play on, keeping them free from mud in wet weather. There are separate sections for small and large dogs, both with a number of play structures like balance beams, a jumping frame, and a play tunnel. Scioto Audubon is open to the public and operated by the Columbus and Franklin County Metro Parks.  Toledo Pet Farm Dog Park Located at: 1429 Baronial Plaza Dr, Toledo, OH, US, 43615 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Toledo Pet Farm is a doggie daycare, boarding facility, and groomer that includes a dog park. You can pay an hourly fee to use their dog park, which features agility equipment for training and dog pools for cooling down. The employees also offer training for dogs, if your new puppy is a little unruly. Contact Toledo Pet Farm for more details on their services. Wiggly Field Dog Park Located at: 7850 VOA Park Dr, West Chester, OH, US, 45069 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Wiggly Field Dog Park, located within the Voice of America MetroPark, features two fenced-in areas to let your pups roam off-leash - one for small dogs and one for large dogs. There are plenty of benches and shade structures throughout the field so you can rest away from the sun. The park is free to use and operated by MetroParks of Butler County. Walnut Woods Dog Park Located at: 6716 Lithopolis Rd, Groveport, OH, US, 43125 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Walnut Woods Dog Park features a 3-acre dog park for large dogs plus a separate 1-acre dog park for small dogs. These fenced-in areas include a pond to swim in, agility equipment to play with and pavilions for dog owners to relax. Walnut Woods is open to the public and operated by the Columbus and Franklin County Metro Parks. Washington Park Dog Park Located at: 1230 Elm St, Cincinnati, OH, US, 45202 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Washington Park’s Dog Park has a number of amenities for dogs to enjoy. There’s a water creek for dogs to play in, a water fountain for pups to drink, and synthetic canine turf for cleanliness. There are large granite boulders providing a nice aesthetic and benches lining the fence, so you can relax. Washington Park is free and open to the public but if you’re driving in, you’ll have to pay to park in the parking garage. The park is operated by the non-profit Cincinnati Center City Development Corporation (3CDC). Twinsburg Dog Park Located at: 9577 Liberty Rd, Twinsburg, OH, US, 44087 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Twinsburg Dog Park, located in Liberty Park, is a smaller dog park but is considered a hidden gem of the community. The fenced-in park has separate areas for small and large dogs and an obstacle course. There are dog-accessible water fountains to cool off, too. The park is open to Twinsburg residents and managed by the Twinsburg Parks & Recreation. Heritage Trail Dog Park Located at: 7262 Hayden Run Rd, Hilliard, OH, US, 43026 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Heritage Trail Dog Park encompasses 2 sections, one for small breeds and the other for large breeds. The park has a unique feature in its doggie splash pad, a water fountain pumping out a thin layer of water for dogs to run and splash through. There is also agility equipment to exercise your pup. The park is open to the public and is a joint project between the City of Hilliard and the Columbus and Franklin County Metro Parks. Pooch Playground at Pizzurro Park Located at: 989 Pizzurro Pike Rd, Gahanna, OH, US, 43230 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Pooch Playground at Pizzurro Park includes a 4-acre fenced area for off-leash play, with separate areas for small and large dogs. There is an agility area to train and exercise your dogs. The large dog area includes paved paths for the handicapped. The Park is open to the public and managed by the Gahanna Department of Parks & Recreation. Glass City Dog Park Located at: 1252 Wildwood Rd, Woodsdale Park, Toledo, OH, US, 43614 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Glass City dog park features three separate fenced-in areas, one for small dogs, one for large dogs, and one for mixed use - including special events! There are plenty of benches, picnic pavilions, and agility equipment for your dog to play on. The park's land is owned by the city but leased and operated by a non-profit Toledo Unleashed. Memberships are required to enter, but it’s well worth it to enjoy this amazing park and its fun events!  Godown Park Located at: 6099 Godown Rd, Worthington, OH, US, 43085 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Godown Park was developed as a dog park from its inception and was built as a partnership between the City of Columbus and the City of Worthington. It features two sections, one for small dogs and one for large dogs, totaling 5.5 acres. There are benches to rest on, pathways to walk, and a dog water fountain to help them cool off. The park is operated by Worthington’s Parks & Recreation Department and is open to the public. Veterans Park Dog Park Located at: 1714 Schneider St NE, Canton, OH, US, 44721 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Veterans Park in Plain Township includes 4 acres of fenced-in dog park for your pup to run around in. 1.5 acres of the park is dedicated to small dogs and 2.5 acres for large dogs, both with shade to relax from the heat. If you pledge to clean up after your pet, their photo can be featured on the “It’s My Doodie Gallery.” Veterans Park is open to the public and managed by the Plain Township Parks & Recreation. Cooperation Station Dog Park Located at: 1439 OH-305, Cortland, OH, US, 44410 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Within the Mosquito Lake State Park, there is a dog park called Cooperation Station. This off-leash dog park has two sections for small and large dogs plus access to Mosquito Lake for all the swimming dogs out there. There is plenty of shade and drinking water provided to cool off your dog if they don't swim. Rocky Fork Metro Park Located at: 7180 Walnut St, Westerville, OH, US, 43081 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The dog park at Rocky Fork is a single fenced-in park with 1.8 acres to play in. They have a shade structure and a unique splash pad feature with a water fountain that sprays water for the dogs to play in. Rocky Fork is open to the public and operated by the Columbus and Franklin County Metro Parks. Deeds Point Dog Park Located at: 2600 Ridge Ave, Dayton, OH 45414 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The newly relocated Deeds Point Dog Park is 1.2 acres larger than the previous park with separate areas for small and large dogs. It’s now located north of Triangle Park. There is a concrete walking trail for those with disabilities and shelters with picnic tables to provide shade. The park is operated by Five Rivers Metroparks and is open to the public.

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May 24, 2023

5 Things Dog Breeders Should Know About Taxes

Filing taxes can get confusing, especially when you breed and sell dogs. It can be hard to know what records you need to keep and for how long. So whether you’re wondering if income from dog breeding needs to be reported or you’re not sure which expenses are deductible, put your mind at ease with our list of 5 things dog breeders should know when filing taxes. #1 You will fall into 1 of 2 categories There are 2 categories dog breeders can fall into, the hobby category or the business category. There are a lot of requirements that need to be met before you can classify your dog breeding as a business. As a result, many dog breeders will find they fall under the hobby category. No matter if your dog breeding classifies as a business or hobby, you must report any and all income earned from dog breeding. Any income you get from selling puppies, stud dog services, or boarding is taxable income that needs to be reported. To be classified as a business, you must demonstrate that you are working toward making a profit. This includes keeping records, having a separate bank account just for your dog breeding business, and even creating a Limited Liability Company (LLC) for your business. A company is seen as being for-profit if it has made a profit in the last few years. Counting the current year, you must make a profit for 3 out of the 5 past years. #2 You will need to fill out a Schedule C form Dog breeders will need to fill out the Schedule C form along with Form 1040. This form is for sole proprietors of an LLC or self-employed sole proprietors. On the Schedule C form, you will state all your income from dog breeding. You can add any dog breeding expenses you had as deductions on this form. Hobby dog breeders will also use the Schedule C form to list any deductions. #3 Know the difference between employees and independent contractors  People aiding temporarily in your dog breeding will fall under the independent contractor category while those who are frequently around and an integral part of the whole business are considered employees. Just like other businesses, employees will get a W-2 while independent contractors should be given a 1099-NEC if they've made at least $600 during that year as a contractor for you. #4 Know which expenses are deductible If an expense is vital to breeding dogs, you can put it down as a tax write-off. Deductible expenses include equipment like whelping boxes, leashes, food, and litter delivery supplies; veterinary expenses such as vaccinations, spaying, neutering, and c-sections; and animal transportation expenses such as trips to the vet, driving for puppy introductions, or delivering a puppy to a customer. Dog purchases made by you, like the purchase of a stud or dam, don’t count as business expenses but dogs can be depreciated over the timespan of 7 years. If you breed dogs at your home, you may be eligible for a home office deduction. However, there are some requirements that can be disqualifying. For example, this space must be used exclusively for dog-breeding-related matters and cannot be a general-use room for other activities. #5 Keep a detailed record of all income and expenses All dog breeding expenses must be legitimate with receipts and records. Whenever you have veterinarian visits related to dog breeding, it’s vital you keep related paperwork. When adding veterinary expenses as deductions, keep records of these receipts that include what was performed, the date, successful payment, the dog’s name, and your name. Record-keeping is so important because including an excess of expense deductions on your taxes can quickly flag the IRS and have you audited. Because you’ll need a detailed paper trail when filing your taxes and in the case of an audit, keep financial records and other related paperwork for 7 years. Looking to find loving homes for your puppies? Create an account on Lancaster Puppies to connect with individuals and families searching for a new four-legged friend to bring home!

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May 24, 2023

Cockapoos: A Dog for All Life Stages and Ages

Believed to be the first planned designer dog, the Cockapoo is a popular breed known for its ability to mesh well with owners of all ages and families of all sizes. These hypoallergenic dogs, also known as Cockapoodles or Cockerpoos, are great apartment dogs that get along well with people and animals. Keep reading to learn about the widely adored Cockapoo! Breed History Dating back to the 1960s, the Cockapoo is a mix between a Cocker Spaniel and a Toy Poodle or Miniature Poodle. While it’s more common for a Toy or Miniature Poodle to be bred with a Cocker Spaniel, occasionally a Standard Poodle is used. The Cockapoo is believed to be the first designer dog breed that was intentionally bred. This breed was created to be a hypoallergenic dog that is both friendly and small. In 1999, the Cockapoo Club of America was founded. This club pushed to have the Cockapoo made into a purebred breed as opposed to a designer breed. This club’s mission to have the Cockapoo classified as a purebred continues today. Cockapoo Characteristics Appearance & Coat The Cockapoo is a small breed that weighs around 6 to 29 pounds and stands 10 to 15 inches tall. This breed’s size depends on whether a Toy or Miniature Poodle was used in breeding. When a Standard Poodle is used in breeding, the puppies are often referred to as Maxi Cockapoos or Standard Cockapoos. Maxi or Standard Cockapoos can weigh up to 65 pounds and stand at least 15 inches tall. With two parent breeds that come in many colors, the Cockapoo has numerous coat possibilities. Cockapoos can be red, black, white, yellow, brown, tan, or cream. Their coats are commonly made up of multiple colors and can have patterns that are bicolor, tricolor, and merle. Dog lovers looking for a breed with very little shedding and drooling should look no further than the Cockapoo. The Cockapoo’s low-shedding and hypoallergenic coat make this breed a perfect match for dog owners with allergies. Temperament The Cockapoo is a friendly, loving dog that enjoys playing with its family and curling up on the couch to cuddle. This breed thrives when spending time with its family and being the center of attention. However, the Cockapoo’s need for attention can make them more susceptible to becoming velcro dogs with separation anxiety. Cockapoos are people-oriented dogs that love spending time with their owners. Social and outgoing, these dogs will make friends with everyone they meet. Cockapoos are fun-loving, little clowns that like entertaining those around them. This breed generally gets along well with other dogs and pets, making doggy playdates and trips to dog parks great activities. Health Cockapoos have a long lifespan of around 12 to 15 years. The most common health issues Cockapoo owners need to look out for are dry skin and ear infections. Because they have ears that hang down, and Cocker Spaniels are susceptible to increased ear wax, Cockapoos need to have their ears checked and cleaned at least once every week. Any time this breed gets wet, their ears should be dried out to prevent moisture from creating ear infections. Regular vet check-ups can help prevent, detect, and treat health issues like cataracts, progressive retinal atrophy, Type 1 Diabetes, skin disorders, hypothyroidism, Cushing’s Syndrome, hip dysplasia, luxating patellas, epilepsy, and heart disease. Caring for a Cockapoo Cockapoo’s Ideal Home Cockapoos are good matches for owners of all ages such as families with young children, families with older children, and the elderly. Additionally, the Cockapoo is very apartment-friendly with its minimal barking and small size. That being said, no matter where you live, your Cockapoo will need daily exercise to burn off all its energy. The Cockapoo is not a good fit for someone who is rarely home or has limited time to spend with their dog. This breed’s ideal home is one where it’s frequently with its family and receives an abundance of attention. Training Best Practices Because they like spending time with their families, Cockapoos will enjoy training. Their intelligence and love of people make Cockapoos relatively easy to train. However, this breed can have difficulty paying attention for long periods of time. To keep your Cockapoo engaged in training, reward it with plenty of treats and praise. Exercise Needs Cockapoos are very playful dogs that enjoy being active. Although they are playful and active, the Cockapoo doesn’t require excessive exercise. Owners can expect to give this breed around 15 minutes of exercise every day. The Cockapoo’s Poodle side leads them to need mental stimulation in addition to daily exercise to burn off energy and prevent boredom. Grooming & Hygiene Cockapoos are clean dogs that don’t have a “dog smell.” This breed doesn’t need scheduled baths and should only be given baths when they are dirty. Bathing this breed too frequently can strip its coat of oils, drying it out. The Cockapoo’s long, curly coat will need daily grooming to stay in good shape. Depending on how curly your Cockapoo’s coat is, you can expect to take this breed to the groomer around every 4 to 6 weeks. Like all breeds, the Cockapoo’s teeth should be brushed regularly and their nails should be clipped at least once a month. Take Home a Cockapoo Puppy Does the Cockapoo check all your pet-search boxes? Find Cockapoo puppies near you to meet your next four-legged best friend!

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May 24, 2023

The History and Purpose of Dog Breeding

Throughout history, dog breeding has existed to serve many purposes. Going way back in time you’ll find our reasons for breeding dogs today add on to the original purposes humans had. Keep reading to learn more about why dog breeding began and how it has transformed over the years. The Beginning of Dog Breeding Dog breeding has been around for thousands of years and has evolved greatly throughout those years. Breeding dogs began as a way to transfer their personalities, temperaments, and behavior to future generations. In contrast to dog breeding today, humans did not originally breed dogs for aesthetic purposes. Dogs were bred to pass on and improve their heightened senses of hearing, smell, and eyesight so future litters would excel at herding, hunting, retrieving, and guarding. The Impact of Domestication Dog breeding has also brought more laid-back and calm dog breeds into existence. Dogs with lower energy levels and calmer temperaments were less likely to survive in the wild. However, dog breeding and domestication have kept these chill breeds alive and thriving. Dog breeding has also passed along the social skills that domesticated dogs have with humans, such as recognizing an object their owner is staring at and going over to inspect it. Dog Breeding in the Victorian Era As time went on, dog breeding expanded to include breeding for aesthetics and passing along physical traits. This included breeding dogs to create new looks and physical appearances. The majority of dog breeds in the modern world are a result of Britain’s Victorian Era. During the Victorian Era, Great Britain saw dog breeding soar in popularity among the upper class. In fact, this is when different breed categories emerged and pedigree tracking began. Today, many breeds with distinct features have Victorian Britain to thank for their iconic appearances. For example, the Victorian Era gave us the Dachshund’s short stature and the German Shepherd’s dense, muscular toning. The Rise of Breed-Specific Health Conditions The negative consequence of creating hundreds of new dog breeds is the rise in genetic diseases and conditions. When dogs were bred to change their size and stature, also known as conformation breeding, breed-specific health issues began to grow as well. For example, over time as Bulldog breeds were bred, they morphed from dogs that had lean but still strong appearances into dogs with larger heads, broader bodies, and squished faces that cause breathing problems. Today, Bulldogs cannot give birth to their litters naturally and need humans to aid in delivery by cesarean. Because Bulldogs have an array of health conditions, you need to be extra cautious in choosing a dog breeder when looking to buy a Bulldog. Bulldog breeders need to be especially thorough in their health checks and pedigree tracing, as well as fully knowledgeable and experienced in breeding Bulldogs. Designer Dog Breeding When the Poodle was first bred with another purebred dog in the 1980s, designer dog breeds were created. Poodles are mixed with other breeds to create dogs that are very intelligent, low-shedding, and allergy-friendly. Designer dog breeding takes 2 healthy dogs of different breeds with good temperaments and breeds them to create a designer breed that combines the parent dogs’ best qualities. Breeding to Reduce Health Issues While mixing breeds can lead to health issues, it can also do the opposite and be used to create a healthier breed. An example of this can be seen in the Bernedoodle designer breed. A Bernedoodle is a mix between the Bernese Mountain Dog and Poodle. Sadly, Bernese Mountain Dogs have a short lifespan of only 6 to 8 years, have many genetic health conditions, and are heavy shedders. However, these issues were solved by breeding a Poodle with a Bernese Mountain Dog. Bernedoodles have a lifespan of 12 to 18 years, don’t have the genetic health conditions of Bernese Mountain Dogs, and can be low-shedding depending on the coat they inherit.  Dog Breeding is a Privilege Carelessly breeding dogs without doing thorough health checks, genetic background research and temperament observation can lead to hurting a breed’s reputation and future existence. Breeding dogs should be done to improve dog breeds and not be used as a way to make extra money. Purebred dogs used in breeding need to meet their breed standards to ensure their litters are healthy and positive reflections of these breeds. Support Reputable Breeders Just how important is it to buy a puppy from a reputable breeder? When you buy a puppy from a reputable breeder, you are helping reduce puppy mills and unethical breeding methods. By only buying from ethical dog breeders, you’re ensuring a healthy, standard-following future for that specific breed. Check out our blog on what makes a reputable breeder to learn more about how you can support the practice of safe and healthy dog breeding. Searching for your own four-legged friend to take home? Browse our newest arrivals to find puppies for sale near you!

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May 24, 2023

Lancaster Puppies Reviews

We started Lancaster Puppies so people in our area had a safe place to find their next best friend. We have grown a lot since then, but our goal is still to connect people searching for puppies to reputable breeders near them.  As our site grows we work hard to verify that the breeders advertising with us are reputable and the puppies they are selling are happy and healthy. To do this we rely heavily on our customers’ feedback, both positive and negative. When we hear from a user that a breeder isn’t operating up to our standards we investigate, and ban the breeder if necessary.  How to Spot Bad Puppy Reviews Like any industry, the puppy world can be susceptible to inaccurate or malicious reviews that do not accurately represent breeders or classified websites. As you are looking for your new puppy it is important to be able to decipher between valid complaints and false or exaggerated reviews written by a disgruntled user. Lancaster Puppy reviews are generally honest and positive, but over the years we have encountered false or exaggerated reviews and have learned some techniques for spotting them.  Look Out For Extreme Emotions If you are reading a review and it is filled with negative emotion, it could mean that the reviewer is simply trying to damage a business’s reputation based on their bad experience. An example of an emotional bad Lancaster Puppy review could be something like, “Our dog is out of control, the breeder is the worst!” This customer may have gotten a dog that is too energetic for them to handle, and they take out that negative emotion on the breeder they purchased from.  The Reviewer Isn’t Actually a Lancaster Puppies User These reviews are typically written by people who have heard rumors or had a family member who had a poor experience with a puppy site or breeder. These reviews usually don’t provide any personal information, and just state a negative attribute of the breeder or site.  The Review Focuses on Small or Unimportant Details Another way to spot a bad Lancaster Puppies review is if the user focuses on small details that aren’t relevant to Lancaster Puppies or the service we provide. Bad Lancaster Puppy reviews often are worded like we are the breeder, but in reality, we are simply a classifieds website to connect puppies with their new home.  What Makes Good Lancaster Puppy Reviews? A good Lancaster Puppies review consists of honest comments about the website and experience that lead them to contact a breeder. A good review won’t include any of the features we outlined earlier in this blog, but could be negative or positive. We love hearing from our satisfied users, but we also want to learn about ways our site can be improved to better serve our users and listing breeders.  Since we started Lancaster Puppies 15 years ago it has been our joy to hear how the puppies sold on our site have positively impacted families across the country. Our testimonials page is full of incredible stories, but we want to hear yours! Submit your testimonial here, we can’t wait to hear from you.

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May 24, 2023

Best Hiking Trails for Dogs in PA

Dog-friendly hiking trails are an excellent way to exercise your puppy while exercising yourself. Your puppy gets to enjoy all the smells found on the trail and you get to enjoy being surrounded by nature. Not all hiking trails welcome dogs and many that do restrict dogs to on-leash hiking. Before taking your dog on a hike, be sure to check the park rules to understand what you can and cannot do with your pup. If you are new to Pennsylvania or recently adopted a new puppy, here are our picks for the best hiking trails for dogs in the Keystone State. Wissahickon Valley Park Location: Valley Green Rd, Philadelphia, PA, US, 19128 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Wissahickon Valley Park, located in northwest Philly, has over 50 miles of hiking trails The main feature of this park is the Wissahickon creek and its tributaries. There are designated biking trails as well, so if you’re hiking on those trails, be sure to keep your dog from running in front of bicycles. All dogs must be leased while in the park on a leash no longer than 6 feet. A non-profit called Friends of Wissahickon hosts events throughout the year in the park. Gettysburg National Military Park Location: 1195 Baltimore Pike, Gettysburg, PA, US, 17325 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Gettysburg National Military Park is where the turning point in the American Civil War was fought. It’s also the location where President Lincoln gave his famous Gettysburg Address. If you’re a dog owner who’s also a history buff, definitely check this out! There are 33 miles of trails where dogs are allowed on leashes. Dotted along the trails, you’ll find signs and monuments recounting significant events and locations of the battle. If you’re planning to visit inside any of the buildings or the national cemetery, someone will have to wait outside on dog duty, as dogs are prohibited indoors. Presque Isle State Park Location: 301 Peninsula Dr, Erie, PA, US, 16505 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Presque Isle State Park is a peninsula on Lake Erie that boasts the state’s only “seashore” with miles of public beach. There are 11 miles of trail, including a paved trail around the entire peninsula as well as wooded trails and a beachfront to hike. There are several lighthouses to check out on your visit. Dogs are allowed throughout the park, so long as they are leashed. Be weary during high tide; there may be sections of trails closed due to flooding. Valley Forge National Historical Park Location: 1400 N Outer Line Dr, King of Prussia, PA, US, 19406 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Another must-visit park for dog owners who happen to love history is the Valley Forge National Historical Park. The Continental Army, under the command of then-General George Washington, camped at this location over the winter of 1777-1778. It was here that the army emerged with a sense of national unity to eventually defeat the British and gain independence. There are 35 miles of trails for hiking, biking, and horseback riding. You are permitted to hike with your dog as long as they are leashed. Along your journey, you’ll come across historical markers noting where significant events occurred and where famous leaders stayed during the winter. Pennypack Trail Location: Rhawn St &, Holmehurst Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19136 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Pennypack Trail is a Rails-to-Trails Conservancy trail that runs through northeast Philly and Abington Township. There are 16 miles of trails divided among a northern and southern section of the park, and both are worth hiking! You’ll follow an old train track that’s been refurbished as a trail along the Pennypack creek. Along the way, you can see many interesting sights, like where a deadly train crash occurred in 1921. Dogs must be leashed while hiking the multi-use trails. Northwest Lancaster County River Trail Location: 551 Vinegar Ferry Rd, Marietta, PA 17547 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Northwest Lancaster County River Trail is situated along the Susquehanna River with multiple entrances around Marietta and four other municipalities. The multi-use trail is 14 miles long and mostly follows the old Pennsylvania Mainline Canal and train tracks. Dogs are permitted as long as they are leashed. Jacobsburg Environmental Education Center Location: 835 Jacobsburg Rd, Wind Gap, PA, US, 18091 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Jacobsburg Environmental Education Center is a state park with an 18.5-mile network of trails and a visitor’s center with educational exhibits. Your pooch will have to stay outside, but the trails are dog-friendly as long as they remain on a leash. Hunting is permitted in certain areas of the park and you can train your dog to hunt with you. If you are hiking during hunting season, however, be sure to wear blaze orange clothing. Newlin Grist Mill Location: 219 S Cheyney Rd, Glen Mills, PA, US, 19342 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Newlin Grist Mill is a historical park with 8.5 miles of dog-friendly trails to hike with your pup. There are several creeks in this park and, of course, a historical water mill - the namesake of the park. This mill was built in 1703 and ran continuously until 1941. Restored in 1960, the Newlin Grist Mill still works today and is preserved as a historical landmark by the Nicholas Newland Foundation. Dogs hiking the trails around Newlin Grist Mill must be leashed and please avoid wading in the creek, as it could damage the historical mill. Wildwood Park Location: 100 Wildwood Way, Harrisburg, PA, US, 17110 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Wildwood Park is a nature center and park located in the state capital of PA, Harrisburg. There is a mix of paved and unpaved trails of various difficulty to fit what you’re looking for. The 5.3 miles of trails wrap around a small lake where waterfowl are often seen. Dogs with a leash are allowed on all trails. The park will host various events throughout the year, including an annual “Wild About Dogs” event perfect to meet other nature-loving dog owners. Natural Lands Stroud Preserve Location: 454 N Creek Rd, West Chester, PA, US, 19382 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Stroud Preserve, owned and operated by the nonprofit Natural Lands, is a nature preserve of grassland, farmland, and woodland. It was created in 1990 by the estate of Dr. Morris Stroud for public and scientific use. The Stroud Water Research Center uses the land to study the effects of streams and rivers. There’s a historical 1740’s farmhouse to see and, of course, plenty of hiking available on its 9 miles of trail. Dogs are permitted if they’re on a leash and you may also come across some horseback riders on the trails. Monocacy Hill Recreation Area Location: Rte 422 & Hill Rd, Birdsboro, PA, US, 19508 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Monocacy Hill Recreation Area is a wooded park with over 5 miles of trails, all of which are dog-friendly. They are required to be leashed on the trails and there is hunting allowed, giving you the opportunity to train your dog if you’d like. During the hunting season in the park, be sure to wear orange! The trails get rocky at times and proper footwear is recommended. John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge Location: 8601 Lindbergh Blvd, Philadelphia, PA, US, 19153 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge is a refuge located right next to the Philadelphia airport. They have more than 10 miles of hiking trails around the preserve, including wheelchair-accessible trails. There is an observation tower overlooking the marshland, some boardwalks across the water, and a visitor’s center. Dogs are permitted on the trails with a leash. Tobyhanna State Park Location: 114 Campground Rd, Tobyhanna, PA, US, 18466 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Tobyhanna State Park is located in the Poconos in northeastern PA. They have 10 miles of trails with varying difficulty from rugged trails to crushed gravel pathways. You can take your dogs on these trails on a leash and camp with them at the in-park campground. There is also hunting allowed, so you can train your pup off-leash to go hunting. Lancaster Junction Trail Location: 99 Champ Blvd, Manheim, PA 17545 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Lancaster Junction Trail is a former railroad rehabilitated into a trail by the non-profit Rails-to-Trails Conservancy. This well-shaded trail is about 2.3 miles long and has creek access for your dog to cool off on a hot summer day. Pets are permitted on the trail as long as they are leashed. Natural Lands Wawa Preserve Location: 127 Valley Rd, Media, PA, US, 19063 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Wawa Preserve, owned and operated by the non-profit Natural Lands, offers about 6 miles of trails in a variety of environments to hike with your leashed dog. You’ll hike through dense woodlands and sunny meadows filled with milkweed, goldenrod, and little bluestem. This preserve was created in 1973 and expanded in 2012 by the Wood family, who operated a dairy farm in the town of Wawa. Natural Lands ChesLen Preserve Location: 1199 Cannery Rd, Coatesville, PA, US, 19320 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The ChesLen Preserve, owned and operated by the non-profit Natural Lands, has over 9 miles of trails and is the largest nature preserve open to the public in Chester County. There are many flower-filled meadows and is designated as a “Pennsylvania Wild Plant Sanctuary.” For the kids, there’s a nature playground where they can climb logs, ride a seesaw, and more. Dogs are permitted throughout the park but must be leashed. Lackawanna River Heritage Trail Location: 101-199 W Elm St, Scranton, PA 18505 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Lackawanna River Heritage Trail is another trail made from a former train track, refurbished by the non-profit Rails-to-Trails Conservancy. The Scranton section of the trail is 6.1 miles long but the whole route is more than 70 miles of trail. There are 7 access points in the Scranton section trail. You can hike this trail with your dogs as long as they’re leashed. Lebanon Valley Rail-Trail Location: 31 Valley Rd, Hershey, PA 17033 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Lebanon Valley Rail Trail is an 18-mile stretch of railroad that’s been refurbished by the non-profit Rails-to-Trails Conservancy. The trail passes through many amazing towns in PA Dutch country with 10 trailheads to access the trail. There are many historical landmarks from the 18th and 19th centuries close to the trail, so there’s no lack of sites to see along your hike. Dogs can hike with you if they’re on a leash. Stony Valley Railroad Grade Location: 2680 Stony Valley Railroad Grade, Dauphin, PA 17018 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Stony Valley Railroad Grade is a former railroad turned into a trail by the non-profit Rails-to-Trails Conservancy. It features almost 20 miles of trails for you to hike with your leashed dog. This trail takes you through state game lands and crosses paths with the Appalachian Trail. Then it ends with the Lebanon Reservoir, which delivers fresh water to the city of Lebanon. D&L Trail - Lehigh Canal Location: 134 River St, Bethlehem, PA 18018 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The D&L Trail is a former railroad that runs for 142 miles right through the heart of the Lehigh Valley. The Bethlehem section, in particular, is very nice. This scenic trail is right on the water in between the Lehigh River and the Lehigh Canal. On your walk, you can see the old steel stacks. Dogs are permitted on the trail with a leash.

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May 24, 2023

Breed Spotlight: Shetland Sheepdogs

Shetland Sheepdogs, colloquially known as the Sheltie, are an extremely intelligent breed who loves their family. They are highly adaptable, making them a perfect match for any family. Breed History Shetland Sheepdogs were originally bred on the Shetland Islands, a group of rocky islands in Scotland. They were used by Scottish farmers to herd sheep, ponies, and poultry. Because of their isolation on the remote islands, the Shetland Sheepdogs were unknown to the rest of the United Kingdom until the early 20th century. They were recognized by the Kennel Club in 1909. The Shetland Sheepdog’s Characteristics Appearance & Coat Shelties have a double coat with a short and dense undercoat and a longer, harsher topcoat. They have a distinctly furry mane and frill with smooth hair on their head. Shelties can be a variety of colors, including Black & White; Black, White & Tan; Blue Merle & White; Blue Merle, White & Tan; Sable & White. Temperament Shetland Sheepdogs are extremely affectionate and make a wonderful companion to a family with children. They are loyal to their owners and a bit reserved towards strangers. They are extremely intelligent and can be trained in many different agility sports. Health Shelties are generally healthy but could suffer from Hypothyroidism, Collie Eye Anomaly, von Willebrand’s Disease, Canine Hip Dysplasia, or Dermatomyositis. A healthy Sheltie could live 12 to 18 years. Caring for a Sheltie A Sheltie’s Ideal Home A Sheltie’s ideal home would be with a loving family and plenty of fenced-in yard to run around. They are extremely affectionate and loyal to their owners and will often follow them around the house. If you are often busy and out of the house, a Sheltie might not be the right fit. They were bred as herding dogs, so having a fenced-in yard to run around will be enjoyable for your pup. Training Best Practices Shetland Sheepdogs can be trained in a variety of activities. They have a natural inclination to herd, so they are excellent at competitive herding. They’ll also do great at agility, obedience, showmanship, flyball, and tracking. Their eagerness to please makes them easier to train, especially with positive reinforcement from their owners. Exercise Needs As mentioned above, the Sheltie is an energetic herding breed that needs daily exercise outdoors. They will enjoy walks, playing fetch, and running around fenced-in yards. They are relatively inactive indoors, so if you live in an apartment, be sure to take them outside multiple times each day. Grooming & Hygiene The Sheltie’s thick double coat should be groomed at least once a week and multiple times a week during shedding season. While grooming, check for any matting in hidden areas, like the ears and armpits. The coat naturally repels dirt, so they should only require a bath when they get extra dirty. Does the Sheltie sound like the perfect addition to your family? Find Shetland Sheepdog puppies for sale near you.

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May 24, 2023

Breed Spotlight: Jack Russell Terrier

The Russell Terrier, more commonly known as the Jack Russell Terrier, is a spunky, loving, and energetic family dog beloved by families across the world. Let’s take a look at some of the traits that make the Jack Russell Terrier one of the most popular breeds in the United States.  History of the Jack Russell Terrier The Jack Russell Terrier breed was developed in England in the 19th century primarily by one man, Parson John Russell. Parson was an avid hunter and sought to create a breed that would excel at chasing foxes from their dens. They served as working dogs until the 1900s when they made their way to the United States. Here they gained popularity as family dogs, and the AKC renamed the breed to the Parson Russell Terrier to differentiate the working breed from the family breed. Most other organizations and avid breed enthusiasts still refer to them as Jack Russell Terriers.  Jack Russell Terrier Characteristics  Appearance & Coat Jack Russell Terriers are compact and athletic, built to chase foxes out of their holes. They have a soft and dense undercoat with a harsh, weatherproof top coat. They should be primarily white with black or tan markings.  Temperament Jack Russells are very outgoing, friendly, and playful. They make great family companions and love nothing more than playing games with their family. While they love making friends with people, they sometimes see cats and other small animals as prey, so supervision is recommended in these situations.  Health They are known to live long and healthy lives, and responsible breeders will screen them for common health issues. They can be susceptible to some eye conditions, deafness, and Legg Perthes, a disorder in the hip joints common with small breeds.  Caring for a Jack Russell Terrier A Jack Russell’s Ideal Home Jack Russell’s fit in with families of all shapes and sizes, as long as they are included in the fun. They don’t do well being left alone in the yard and require interactive playtime to stay mentally stimulated. They get along well with children but should be socialized with small kids early in their lives.  Training Best Practices They are very intelligent and typically take quickly to training if it is started early in their life. If training isn’t begun early stubborn behavior can appear, which will make training more difficult. Positive reinforcement is a common method in training Jack Russells, and we recommend including fun games in the training process.  Exercise Needs Jack Russell Terriers are high energy and do best in an active family. They love going on adventures with their owners and playing games that stimulate them mentally and physically. Exercise that incorporates quality time with their family is always the best option for a Jack Russell.  Grooming and Hygiene Their coat can come in three varieties, rough, smooth, and broken. All three coat varieties require minimal maintenance and should be brushed a few times per week to keep shedding under control and to remove dirt and debris from their hair. As with all breeds, their nails should be kept trim and their ears should be cleaned regularly.  Browse Jack Russell Terrier Puppies Today If you’ve decided that the Jack Russell Terrier is the breed for your family, browse Jack Russell Terrier Puppies on Lancaster Puppies today!

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May 24, 2023

The Best Dog Parks in Pennsylvania

Dog parks are an excellent way to get outside, exercise your pup, and socialize with other dog owners. They typically feature a large, fenced-in, grassy area where you can let your dog off its leash to run around and play with other dogs. Some will have multiple enclosures for different sizes of dogs and some will have equipment to play with, like tunnels & ramps. If you’re new to Pennsylvania or recently adopted a new puppy, here are our picks for the best dog parks in the Keystone State. Beau's Dream Dog Park at Buchanan Park Located at: 901 Buchanan Ave, Lancaster, PA, US, 17603 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Beau’s Dream Dog Park features both small and large dog areas. There are splash pads, a doxi tunnel, and a tennis ball tree that launches tennis balls. The park is maintained by the City of Lancaster’s Parks and Recreation Department and is free from sunrise to sunset. Schuylkill River Dog Park Located at: S 25th St & Spruce St, Philadelphia, PA, US, 19103 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Dog Park at Schuylkill River Park has 2 separate enclosed areas for small and large dogs. Both feature a patented K-9 Grass that lessens contagions, mess, and mud. They also have doggy water fountains for when your dog gets thirsty while exercising in the park. The park is maintained by the Philadelphia Department of Parks and Recreation and a non-profit called the Friends of Schuylkill River Park. Lloyd Park Located at: 703 N Lloyd Ave, Downingtown, PA, US, 19335 Visit Their Website Lloyd Park is located in Chester County and features lots of activities, including a dog park. This fenced-in area is unique because it features a creek as one of its borders. Water-loving dogs will enjoy running in and out of the creek. The park is maintained by the Caln Township Parks and Recreation and is open to the public. John Rudy Park Located at: 400 Mundis Race Rd, York, PA, US, 17406 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website John Rudy Park features an off-leash dog park called Canine Meadows. There are 3 large enclosed areas (small, medium, & large) with fake fire hydrants and rocks to play around. The park is maintained by York County Parks and is open to the public from dawn to dusk. Hartwood Acres County Dog Park Located at: 200 Hartwood Acres, Pittsburgh, PA, US, 15238 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Hartwood Acres County Dog Park is a large fenced-in area near the amphitheater and includes a water fountain to keep your dogs hydrated in warmer months. There is a creek nearby for the dogs who enjoy water, but it is not within the fenced-in area so you should keep them leashed. As of the writing of this blog, they are working on building a small dog section of the park which will be complete in Spring of 2023. The park is maintained by the Allegheny County Parks Department. Falls Township Park Located at: 9125 Mill Creek Rd, Levittown, PA, US, 19054 Visit Their Website Falls Township Park has 2 fenced-in dog runs for small and large dogs. There is plenty of bench seating and picnic tables to rest while your dog plays. They can also go for a swim in the nearby lake but should be leashed as it’s outside of the fenced areas. This park is maintained by the Falls Township Parks & Recreation Department. Haverford Reserve Dog Park Located at: 9000 Parkview Dr, Haverford, PA, US, 19041 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Haverford Reserve Dog Park features 2 fenced-in areas for large and small dogs and features ramps and other equipment for your dogs to play on. They also have several picnic tables to rest at while your dog plays. The park is maintained by the Haverford Township Parks and Recreation Department. Overlook Dog Park Located at: 2215 Fruitville Pike, Lancaster, PA, US, 17601 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Overlook Dog Park has 3 fenced-in areas: one for large dogs, one for small dogs, and one where small and large dogs are allowed to mix. The park is maintained by the Manheim Township’s Recreation Department and a community organization called the Manheim Township Dog Owners Group. You do need to register and pay an annual fee for access to this park, but it’s worth it! Doggie Dugout Located at: 4075 Lisburn Rd, Lisburn, PA, Mechanicsburg, PA, US, 17055 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Doggie Dugout at Lower Allen Community Park features two fenced-in areas for small and large dogs. They have water available for the dogs and seating for the owners. The Doggie Dugout is maintained by the  Lower Allen Township Parks Department and is open during normal park hours. Sewickley Heights Borough Park Off-Leash Area Located at: 1901 Glen Mitchell Rd, Sewickley Heights, PA, US, 15143 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Sewickley Heights Borough Park features a unique experience for dogs because there are horse trails throughout the park. Your pup may be able to encounter a horse for the first time when visiting the park. The designated off-leash area is partially fenced, so be sure to train your dog to stay near before bringing them here. The park is maintained by Sewickley Heights Borough and is open from 7am - 5pm or 8:30pm during the summer. West Manheim Dog Park Located at: 255 St. Bartholomew Rd, Hanover, PA, US, 17331 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The West Manheim Park features 2 fenced-in areas located behind the playground for large and small dogs. It can be troublesome reaching the dog park for handicapped people, as it’s up a hill, but it’s totally worth the trek if you can. The park is maintained by the West Manheim Township Parks and Recreation. West Mill Creek Park Located at: Mill Creek Rd & Old Gulph Rd, Narberth, PA, US, 19401 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The West Mill Creek Park is an off-leash dog park without any fencing, so make sure your dog is well-trained before visiting the park. There is a wonderful creek running through the park for your dog to explore. The park is maintained by the Lower Merion Township’s Department of Parks and Recreation and an organization called the Friends of West Mill Creek Park. You will need an off-leash permit from the township to visit. Mingo Creek Park Located at: 3111 PA-13, New Eagle, PA, US, 15332 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Mingo Creek Park features a large off-leash area to explore as well as miles of on-leash trails to hike. There are some woods and brush in the middle of the off-leash area, which might confuse some dog owners thinking the area isn’t fenced in, but it is! It just gives your pup one more thing to explore. The park is maintained by the Washington County Parks & Recreation. Roonie's Canine Corner at Robert Lambert Park Located at: 1133 Pottstown Pike, West Goshen, PA, US, 19380 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Roonie’s Canine Corner is a fenced-in area at Robert Lambert Park with benches for the owners. There are toys and ramps for the dogs to play with and water bowls to rehydrate. The park is maintained by the West Goshen Township Park and Recreation Department. Penn Hills Dog Park Located at: 754 Jefferson Rd, Penn Hills, PA, US, 15235 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Penn Hills Dog Park is a large, fenced-in dog run with benches and chairs for the owners to relax. The park is maintained by Penn Hills Parks & Recreation and is open to the public from April through November. Polk Valley Dog Park Located at: 2068 Polk Valley Rd, Hellertown, PA, US, 18055 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Polk Valley Dog Park is adjacent to the Polk Valley Park, featuring two fenced-in areas for small and large dogs. There is also seating for the owners to relax and chat. The park is maintained by the Lower Saucon Township Parks and Recreation. Seger Dog Park Located at: 1001 Rodman St, Philadelphia, PA, US, 19107 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Seger Dog Park, located in the heart of Philly, is a fenced-in dog park with artificial turf, dog fountains, and benches for the owners to relax. They also host annual events throughout the year. Seger Dog Park is maintained as a non-profit organization that doesn’t receive public funding. Instead, they rely on donations to remain free and open to the public. Consider donating if you’ll be spending time there regularly. Riding Meadow Park Located at: Squaw Run Rd E, Pittsburgh, PA, US, 15238 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Riding Meadow Park is an off-leash and completely open park for you and your dog to explore. Be sure to train your pup to stay near before adventuring in this park. There are wooded trails and a creek to play in. The park is maintained by the Borough of Fox Chapel Park Commission. Orianna Hill Dog Park Located at: 900 N Orianna St, Philadelphia, PA, US, 19123 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website Orianna Hill Park is a neighborhood-owned park that features a fenced-in dog park, picnic tables, and a nice garden area. The park is maintained by a community organization called the Friends of Orianna Hill Park and requires you to register and donate to gain access to the dog park. The funds help keep the park looking beautiful year-round. Lucky Paws Dog Park and Pool Located at: 2273 Lovi Rd, Freedom, PA, US, 15042 Visit Their FacebookVisit Their Website The Lucky Paws Dog Park and Pool is an off-leash, fenced-in dog park with a doggie pool, agility equipment, and an indoor section for year-round play. They will host various classes and events and have a dog salon on their premises if you’d like to groom your pup. Access to the dog park and pool requires a fee and reservations are recommended due to limited capacity.

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May 24, 2023

2022 AKC Breeds: All About the Newly Recognized Breeds

2022 was a milestone year for the American Kennel Club (AKC) as they reached over 200 dogs in their breed registry. Being recognized by the AKC ensures that these breeds will remain consistent and healthy for decades to come as a result of the club’s standards. Read on to learn more about the breeds newly registered with the AKC in 2022. 1. Russian Toy - Toy Group Origin As its name suggests, the Russian Toy comes from Russia where it was bred from the English Toy Terrier. These tiny dogs with big personalities were popular among Russian aristocrats. Throughout history, these dogs have also acted as rat population control and watchdogs. As of 2022, there are believed to be just under 800 Russian Toys in the United States. Appearance Russian Toys are a small dog breed, standing around 8-11 inches tall and weighing up to 6.5 pounds. This breed is on the list of smallest dog breeds worldwide along with Chihuahuas, Toy Poodles, Pomeranians, and Yorkshire Terriers. Russian Toys have longer hair on their ears, bellies, legs, and tails. Because of its appearance and small size, the Russian Toy is frequently confused with Chihuahuas and Papillons. These dogs usually have coats that are black and tan, brown and tan, or red. These coats can be long or short and smooth. While both coat lengths shed, Russian Toys with short, smooth hair shed less than those with long hair.  Energy & Activity Russian Toys need around 45 minutes of exercise a day and mentally stimulating activities to keep them busy. This breed excels at agility competitions and trick training. The Russian Toy is very active and will need daily walks, frequent play, and space to run around. Even with their energetic nature, these dogs love to cuddle and curl up in the lap of their owner. Temperament The Russian Toy is a very loyal and protective dog that doesn’t become aggressive. These dogs are highly intelligent and eager to please their owners so training can be fairly easy with Russian Toys (although they can have a stubborn streak so firmness in training is important). This breed can be very vocal, doesn’t like being left alone, and loves attention. Interestingly, a difference in coat lengths isn’t the only thing that makes a short-haired Russian Toy differ from its long-haired counterpart. Short-haired Russian Toys have more “terrier attitude” than their long-haired counterparts. With a long life expectancy of 12-14 years, this breed will make an affectionate and loving four-legged companion for many years. Browse toy-size puppies for sale. 2. Mudi - Herding Group Origin The Mudi (pronounced “moodie”) comes from Hungary where it worked as a farm dog herding and protecting sheep. In addition to being farm dogs, Finland and the United States have used this breed for search-and-rescue purposes. The Mudi is a rare breed, in fact, it’s believed there are only around a few thousand Mudis in the world! While there are some in Finland, the majority of these Mudis can be found living in Hungary. The Mudi was first included in the AKC’s Foundation Stock Service in 2004 and was recognized by the United Kennel Club (UKC) in 2006. However, its rarity led this breed to wait until 2022 to be recognized by the AKC. Today, the Mudi is still herding sheep in Hungary with flocks as big as 500 sheep.  Appearance With a lengthy life expectancy of 12-14 years, the Mudi is a medium-sized dog that stands around 15-18.5 inches and weighs between 18-29 pounds. This breed generally has a black coat with merle markings but can also have a coat that’s brown, gray, white, yellow, or gray-brown. These dogs have coats that are medium-length, wavy, thick, and shed moderately. Their naturally short, stubby tails and upright, perky ears match the Mudi’s happy personality. Energy & Activity Mudis are friendly, energetic dogs who love being challenged and kept busy. They are smart and athletic, expertly herding livestock no matter how difficult the animals may be. These dogs love playful, athletic activities and excel at frisbee, fetch, obedience training, agility competitions, herding, and flyball. Temperament This breed is very affectionate, gentle, and loving. Their intelligence and eagerness to please their owners make these dogs easy to train. The Mudi is a great watchdog for its family and the livestock it’s in charge of, staying vigilant and ready to alert. Devoted, loyal, and non-hostile, the Mudi will stand by and protect those it loves. Browse medium-size puppies for sale. 3. Bracco Italiano - Sporting Group Origin Originating from Italy, the Bracco Italiano also goes by the names “Italian Pointer” and “Italian Pointing Dog.” This breed is believed to be the oldest European pointing dog, being traced back to the 4th or 5th Century B.C. through art and literature. Despite existing for so long, the Bracco Italiano wasn’t introduced to the United States until 1994. Even though this breed has been in the AKC Foundation Stock Service since 2001 and had its own Club of America since 2007, the Bracco Italiano wasn’t recognized by the AKC until 2022 and was their 200th breed to be recognized. Appearance The Bracco Italiano is a large dog, weighing between 55-90 pounds and standing around 21-27 inches tall. These dogs are recognizable by their short coats which are white with orange, chestnut, or roan markings. However, even though this breed has a short coat, they are still prone to moderate shedding and aren’t ideal for allergy sufferers. Energy & Activity The Bracco Italiano is a gun dog that works as a hunter, pointer, and retriever. These dogs are very athletic and love to run, especially chasing after birds. To burn off their energy, they need no less than 30 minutes of physical exercise a day and additional mental stimulation. With a long life expectancy of 10-14 years, the Bracco Italiano is a great gun dog and hunting buddy with plenty of energy and stamina for hunting trips. Temperament These dogs are very intelligent and eager to please but fit best with owners who have experience in dog training. The Bracco Italiano makes the perfect family dog as it gets along well with other dogs, is good with kids, and has a temperament that is sweet, affectionate, and gentle. Browse large-size puppies for sale. Are you looking to add a puppy registered with the American Kennel Club to your family? Check out AKC-registered puppies for sale near you!

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May 24, 2023

How to Choose a Good Sire Dog and Dam Dog

Choosing to breed dogs should come from a desire to improve a breed or solve a common problem with a particular breed. Selecting good sires and dams is so important to breeding dogs responsibly and improving their breeds as their traits, health, and temperaments are passed on. Keep reading to learn more about what makes a good sire and dam. Know Desired Traits Having set traits in mind that you want the puppies to have will further help you find a dam and sire that reflect these wishes. If you’re wanting puppies that are gentle and good with children, seek out a sire and dam that reflect these qualities. Similarly, if you want to breed herding or sporting puppies, know ahead of time the traits that these puppies should have so you can narrow down your search and stay focused on what matters. Good Temperament Sires and dams should be mirrors of the positive qualities their breed or breeds are known for. Don’t just choose a dog based on its physical appearance and color, it needs to have a good temperament too. Making a name for yourself as a reputable breeder by breeding sires and dams with good temperaments can help bring in more buyers as your careful selections will reflect in high-quality puppies. Additionally, it’s hard to know what a matured dog will be like when they are still a puppy, so having the sire and dam, as well as their genetic background, available for buyers to meet will give them an idea of what their puppy will be like as an adult. Good Health Not only is good temperament important when choosing a sire and dam, but their physical development and health need to be assessed as well. You don’t want to choose a sire or dam that has health concerns and further expand those problems to their offspring. The sire and dam’s health should be examined before they are used in breeding to make sure they are in good health and have no genetic conditions. Recognize Flaws It’s important to recognize the shortcomings that a dog has before you breed it. While we see our pets as perfect, it can be hard to make an unbiased decision of whether our dog will make a good sire or dam. You can get a clearer picture of your dog’s abilities and reflection of their breed by entering them in competitions to see how they compare to other dogs of their breed or by having an unbiased, knowledgeable party examine your dog. Compatibility The sire should be compatible with the dam and be able to make up for any shortcomings the dam has. These flaws should be minor issues, like improving a dog’s coat or getting the desired breed color, not issues such as a bad temperament or hereditary health conditions. You can examine a sire’s past litters to see the qualities and temperaments they inherited. This is also helpful to see which of the dam’s traits the sire helped balance out and improve in the litter. You won’t find a sire that improves every flaw the dam has, but instead, focus on the dam’s main flaws and look for a suitable sire that can improve those. Known Pedigree & Background You’ll want to breed dogs whose genetics, lineage, and pedigree are known. Choosing to breed a dog with an unknown background can lead to major issues arising in their offspring. Before choosing to breed a dog, examine their pedigree to ensure they come from good health, temperament, and nature. Low Coefficient of Inbreeding (COI) Inbreeding dogs is advised against by experts of dog breeding as this can create more health issues for their offspring which negatively impacts the breed as a whole. Inbred dogs can have many issues ranging from fertility problems, small litters, breed-specific hereditary conditions, birth defects, and bad temperaments. Determining a dog’s coefficient of inbreeding (COI) will help you determine if a dog is too inbred to be used for breeding. Online COI calculators, like The Kennel Club’s COI Calculator, help responsible breeders keep their litters healthy and meet breed standards. A good COI depends on the breed, but the lower the percentage, the better. Purebred Breeding Requirements When breeding purebred dogs, you’ll need to make sure the sire and dam meet the breed's standards. Likewise, if you would like a litter to be registered with a particular club, such as the American Kennel Club (AKC), both the sire and the dam need to be registered with that desired club. Patience on Your End Finding a suitable sire and dam can take some time, but it’s worth it as their traits will be passed along to their offspring. Taking the time to find a good sire and dam will result in healthy, good-natured puppies that reflect the traits their breed is loved for. Your careful consideration and resulting exceptional puppies will let buyers know you are a responsible and trustworthy breeder with great litters.   Breeding dogs is a privilege and being a responsible breeder is imperative. Remember, no matter how well a dog is bred, their training, handling, and the environment they grow in are also important to their successful development and temperament.Find stud dog services for sale on Lancaster Puppies or advertise your own stud dog’s services.

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Sep 16, 2022

The Best Dog Breeds for Seniors

As you get older, you may look for a furry companion but think that dogs are too high-energy to keep up with. This isn’t the case! There are plenty of dog breeds with characteristics that make them perfect for retirees. The characteristics to look at include size, energy, allergies, maintenance, and temperament. Smaller dogs will be easier to handle as you age and possibly develop arthritis or other conditions. Lower-energy dogs are easier to care for. Hypoallergenic dogs help you stay healthy if you’re sensitive. Lower-maintenance dogs mean you won’t need to groom them as often. Lastly, a calm, loveable temperament that is good with children is great when your grandkids visit. Listed here are our picks for the top 10 best dog breeds for seniors. Bichon Frise These small fluffy pups have a white or off-white coat that is hypoallergenic, if you’re sensitive to pet dander. They have a happy and outgoing personality, and will easily latch onto you as family. Despite their size, Bichon Frises are low energy for most of the day but will have bursts of energy once or twice a day. At those times, letting them outside to sprint around your fenced-in yard will do the trick - and you won’t need to risk injuring yourself by running with them. They have a tendency towards separation anxiety, so they lend themselves well to retirees who enjoy relaxing at home. Find the perfect Bichon Frise for you! French Bulldog French Bulldogs are very affectionate and easygoing, making them a great fit for seniors. They adapt well to a variety of living arrangements so no matter where retirement takes you, your Frenchy can follow. The French Bulldog does great with children if you are concerned about visiting grandchildren. They need about 30 minutes of exercise a day but are flexible with how they exercise. They enjoy just about anything from walks to playing in your backyard. Find the perfect French Bulldog for you! Greyhound These racing dogs may surprise you with how calm and loveable they are. They may be able to run races at over 40mph but really prefer lounging at home instead. Greyhounds are very patient with a moderate energy level, doing well with about 45 minutes of exercise per day. If you’re looking for a larger dog but worried about handling one, Greyhounds are 27-30 in tall but only weigh 60-70 lbs. Find the perfect Greyhound for you! Pembroke Welsh Corgi Pembroke Welsh Corgis are a smart and affectionate breed with an iconic look. They’ll make excellent companions for seniors because they are eager to please and intelligent. You can train them in a variety of jobs, like fetching the morning paper which will lower your risk of falling from bending over each morning. Find the perfect Corgi for you! Shih Tzu This ancient Chinese breed makes for a lively, loyal, and affectionate companion to retirees. The Shih Tzu was bred as a watchdog and will still alert you of unwelcome visitors today. They have short bursts of energy throughout the day but can run out their energy with indoor or outdoor games, making them flexible to fit your lifestyle. Find the perfect Shih Tzu for you! Pug Pugs are an outgoing breed with a loving disposition, making them an excellent choice for seniors. They are also very well-behaved around children for when the grandkids visit. Pugs are perhaps the most apartment-friendly breed on this list, so they’ll do great in a retirement community that allows pets. Find the perfect Pug for you! Miniature Schnauzer The Miniature Schnauzer is another great dog for seniors with sensitive noses, as their soft double coats are hypoallergenic. They make great companions to those who enjoy grooming because their double coat needs brushing twice a week. Brushing is a great bonding activity and your Mini Schnauzer will be fiercely loyal to you. When grandkids visit, your mini schnauzer will enjoy playing with them. And once the visitors leave, they’ll enjoy curling up on your lap. Find the perfect Miniature Schnauzer for you! Maltipoo Although not on our list, a Poodle makes an excellent senior-friendly companion. A Maltese is also a great breed for retirees. So what happens when you mix two great dog breeds? An even better senior-friendly dog breed is the Maltipoo! This affectionate breed will love to lounge with you all day, as they’re often calm and even-tempered. They also make great playmates for grandchildren. They do have a tendency for separation anxiety, so retirees who don’t travel too often make the best owners. Find the perfect Maltipoo for you! Cavapoo Another great breed for seniors that’s even better when mixed with a poodle is the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. When mixed, these pups are called Cavapoos. Cavapoos make playful but gentle companions for seniors. They have higher energy than some other breeds but that energy is mostly directed towards indoor playtime. No need for long walks or runs outside with this puppy. Some fetch or tug-of-war indoors will do just fine. Find the perfect Cavapoo for you! Basset Hound Basset Hounds are perhaps the most relaxed of all the breeds on this list. Their easy-going temperament lends themselves well to relaxing at home with retirees. Bassets don’t need a ton of exercise but one leisurely walk a day will engage their powerful nose and be all the engagement they need in a day. (They’ll certainly be ready for a nap with you afterward.) Since Basset Hounds tend to be lazy, you’ll need to keep an eye on their diet. Overfeeding can lead to obesity. Find the perfect Basset Hound for you! Golden Retriever  Most of the dogs on our list are medium or small dogs because a smaller size is usually best for seniors. But if you’re looking for a large dog to share retired life with, you can’t go wrong with a Golden Retriever. Golden Retrievers are one of the most eager-to-please breeds, making them easy to train. They do, however, have a higher energy level so this breed is right for you if you’re leading an active retired life. Find the perfect Golden Retriever for you!

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Sep 13, 2022

Saint Bernard: The Loveable Nanny

Saint Bernards are a well-known breed in pop culture as a loveable family dog, from Peter Pan to Beethoven. This depiction of Saint Bernards is absolutely true! They’ll make an excellent addition to your family. History of Saint Bernards Saint Bernards originated in the Swiss Alps, where they were once used by hospice monks in the Middle Ages to find lost travelers and pull carts in the deep snow. During the 1800s, the monks began to breed their Saint Bernards to become bigger with thicker coats. It was around this time that the breed made its way to the United States. The Saint Bernard Club of America was formed in 1888. Over the following century, the Saint Bernard became very popular in America, and it became one of the most popular dogs in America during the 1960s and 70s. Today, the Saint Bernard enjoys modest popularity and can be seen in homes, movies, and dog shows across the country. Saint Bernard Characteristics Appearance & Coat Saint Bernards have an iconic look with droopy eyes, floppy ears, wrinkles, and thick double coats. Their colors are generally brown and white, red and white, or brindle and white all with a black mask. Temperament Saint Bernards are sweet and loving to just about everyone they meet. They are especially loving of children and have even been nicknamed the “Nanny Dog” because of how patient they are with kids. They love attention but are not as demanding of it as other breeds. Health Saint Bernards are generally healthy but could suffer from hip or elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, or Von Willebrand’s disease. Dysplasia is when a joint doesn’t fit snugly together. Hypothyroidism is an abnormality in the thyroid gland that reduces metabolism. Von Willebrand’s disease is a bleeding disorder. Caring for a Saint Bernard A Saint Bernard’s Ideal Home A Saint Bernard’s ideal home is one with a loving family and children. They get along well with other pets or on their own. If you live in a hot climate, a Saint Bernard might not be the best fit. They were bred in the Swiss Alps and are accustomed to cold climates with their thick double coats. They are also droolers, so don’t expect your house to be clean all the time. Saint Bernards are a working breed, so they’ll love it when you give them a job around the house. Training Best Practices Early training is essential for Saint Bernards. They can be a little slower to mature than other breeds and are easily excited when people enter the door. Training with positive reinforcement will help them feel excited for people but be reserved in their actions. Saint Bernards are working dogs that can be trained in a variety of dog sports like cart pulling (what they were bred for in the Alps). Exercise Needs Saint Bernards need a moderate amount of exercise. They are not a high-energy breed but still need a daily walk or game of fetch. Training is a good outlet for exercise and mental stimulation, too. Grooming & Hygiene Saint Bernard coats need brushing three times a week. During shedding season, you might want to brush them more often. Saint Bernards don’t need bathing too often unless they become visibly dirty or smelly. They can develop stains around their eyes, you may wish to wipe their face down with a damp cloth as often as you brush them. Find a Saint Bernard for Your Family If you’re ready to add your own Nana or Beethoven to your family, check out the Saint Bernards available from sellers on Lancaster Puppies. You won’t regret adopting this loveable family member.

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Sep 12, 2022

Pomeranians: The Feisty and Loyal Companions of Royalty

The fluffy Pomeranian, colloquially known as “Pom”, is a long-time favorite companion of royals and commoners. They work well in both city and suburban homes, able to burn energy with indoor play and short walks. If you’re looking for a loyal companion with a feisty attitude, then a Pomeranian might be right for you! Breed History Pomeranians were developed in the Pomerania province in Northern Europe as a member of the Spitz breeds. Their ancestors were sled dogs but were bred down to toy-size companions. Legend says that Michelangelo had a Pomeranian sitting on a satin pillow, watching him paint the Sistine Chapel. Theologian Martin Luther, physicist Isaac Newton, composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and President Teddy Roosevelt are other notable figures in history who are said to have owned a Pomeranian. Pomeranians were first brought to England in the mid-18th century by the future Queen Charlotte. Her granddaughter, Queen Victoria held a particular fancy for Pomeranians and is credited with shrinking the breed by half its size during her 64-year reign. In the late 19th century, the breed made it across the sea to America where they were recognized as a breed by the AKC in 1900. Pomeranian Characteristics Appearance & Coat The Pomeranian is a toy breed, reaching about 6-7 inches in height and 3-7 pounds in weight. Its plumed tail is set high and lays its hair flat out across the whole back. Their perky ears are also set high on the head.  The Pomeranian’s long, fluffy, double coat is by far their defining feature. They have longer fur around the chest and neck that forms a frill. This fancy coat can come in 23 different color combinations, including white, black, brown, red, orange, cream, blue, sable, and many combinations of those colors. Temperament Pomeranians are extroverts who love meeting new people and other dogs, but will sometimes act like they’re bigger than they actually are. Poms might try to prove themselves by barking at larger dogs. They are extremely alert and inquisitive, making them a good watchdog for your home. Health When a Pomeranian is in good health, they can live from 12 to 16 years. The best breeders will screen their studs and dams for genetic health problems before they are used in breeding. Ask your breeder if they follow this practice before purchasing from them. Some potential health issues that can arise from unscreened parents include Luxating Patellas, Hypothyroidism, Collapsing Tracheas, Congestive Heart Failure, Seizures, and Alopecia. The recommended tests for your first vet visit are a Patella Evaluation, Cardiac Exam, and Ophthalmologist Evaluation. Caring for a Pomeranian The Pomeranian’s Ideal Home The Pomeranian’s ideal home is with a loving family who gives it a lot of attention. They live well in city and suburban environments, only needing to go on short walks multiple times a day. Pomeranians can do well with children, but it’s not recommended for families with young children who are unable to distinguish between a toy and a toy-sized dog. If you work from home, a Pomeranian is an excellent choice. You can give it the attention it needs by letting it curl up on your lap while at your desk. This breed also makes a great watchdog, alerting you with its bark if there’s an intruder and you’re focused on work. Training Best Practices Pomeranians enjoy learning tricks but have a short attention span. Try to keep training sessions short and fun, rewarding your puppy with treats, play, or praise. Poms can make great therapy dogs because they easily fit on your lap. For this, you’ll need to work on obedience training to keep them from barking at other dogs and jumping off patients’ laps.  Exercise Needs Pomeranians like receiving frequent attention and have a high energy level but don’t have much stamina. This means the best exercise for a Pom is multiple shorter walks throughout the day. With its small size, this breed will also enjoy playing inside as an alternative to one of your walks. When taking your Pomeranian on a walk, it’s best to keep them on a leash. They can easily squeeze through small gaps in fencing or other escape routes. They might also be mistaken for prey by large, predatory birds if they stray too far from their human companion. Grooming & Hygiene The Pomeranian’s fluffy double coat is its most distinctive feature and needs a lot of care to keep it fluffy. Brushing with a wire slicker brush and metal comb twice a week will keep their coats free of tangles and help with shedding. When it sheds about twice a year, you may need to brush them daily. You can bathe Pomeranians once a month or more if they’re starting to smell a bit. As with all dogs, keep a Pom’s nails trimmed. If you hear their nails clicking or scratching the floor as they walk, the nails have gotten too long. It’s also a good idea to brush your Pomeranian's teeth to avoid potential dental issues. As you groom your Pom, check for sores, rashes, or other signs of infection and take them to a veterinarian if you find any. Are you ready to adopt a Pomeranian into your family? Find a Pomeranian puppy from a reputable breeder near you.

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Aug 10, 2022

Back-to-School: The Best Time of the Year to Buy a Puppy

With all the excitement of back-to-school season, you might not think it’s a good time to add a new furry friend to your family. Whether it’s your kindergartener’s first ever day to school, your pre-teen leaping into middle school, or your college student moving away from home, you’re stressed out and busy. But back-to-school is actually a great time to purchase a puppy! Read on to learn why. Puppies Often Cost Less During Back-to-School If you’re thinking back-to-school is too busy a time to buy a puppy, you’re not alone. Many future dog owners put their search on hold during this time, reducing the demand for puppies. Just because there is less demand for puppies doesn’t mean momma dogs aren’t giving birth, however. This leads to less demand for puppies while there is still the same supply as throughout the year. Breeders will often reduce their prices to compensate for the reduced demand. If you’re looking to save a few bucks on your new puppy, now is the time to buy! It’s Easier to Schedule Your Vet Visits When you buy a puppy, you need to take it to a vet for a check-up to provide them with records from the breeder, and receive any shots or medicine that the breeder hasn't given them yet. At busier times of the year, like Christmas, your preferred veterinarian might not be taking new patients, but it’s best not to delay several months for your first visit. Because people are buying less puppies during back-to-school, you’re more likely to get an appointment with your preferred vet. You can even get a perfect time to fit around your schedule. Great For Kids During This Busy Time You’re not the only one who is stressed by back-to-school; your children are stressed, too! A fantastic source of stress relief in children is a pet dog. A recent study found that schoolchildren who spent time with dogs had significantly lower cortisol (stress hormone) levels. All dogs provide this stress relief, but a trained emotional support dog would be even better for your child. Dogs not only relieve stress for children, they also help facilitate learning in children. Specifically, dogs teach responsibility, help with social skills, and develop speech in young children. Anyone who has owned a pet knows that it’s a serious responsibility and daily commitment to take care of the pet. Children can take on some of the responsibilities of a pet dog (when age appropriate), like feeding, walking, and playing. This will help them manage responsibilities later in life. Children will also socialize with dogs, practicing confidence in giving orders to “sit” or explaining things in their surroundings. Lastly, children can improve their speech by talking to dogs. They’ll be less shy in speaking to dogs and might even read their pet a children’s book, practicing what they’ve learned at school. Fill Your Empty Nest When you’re a parent of a burgeoning adult, it is bittersweet when they leave the house for the first time. Your child could be heading off to college or simply moving out and starting a career. Either way, you’re both happy and proud of your kid but sad that you won’t see them as often. This mixture of emotions is referred to as Empty Nest Syndrome. Nothing will replace your child and they’ll always be an important part of your life, but a new puppy can help with the feelings of loneliness you might have. Just like with children, dogs provide stress relief to adults. They’ll also provide you with the companionship you need while your kids are away. Lastly, the responsibility of caring for your new puppy can satisfy your parental needs to care for someone. Ready to Adopt a Puppy During Back-to-School? Have you decided that now is the best time to add a furry friend to your family? Back-to-school season is a great time to save money, get that first vet appointment, help in the development of your young child, or fill an empty nest. Browse the listings available on Lancaster Puppies and find your new puppy today!

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Aug 09, 2022

How to Register Your New Puppy

If you’ve recently adopted a puppy and are considering whether or not to register them, there are a few steps you need to take. These steps vary depending on the organization you’re registering with and whether or not your puppy is purebred. Read on to learn the requirements for your puppy. What are the Benefits of Registering a Puppy? When considering whether to register a puppy with a kennel club or not, there are a few benefits to keep in mind. First off, you’ll receive all the paperwork confirming it’s a purebred. Also, it makes your dog eligible for dog shows and dog sports. If you’d like to train your puppy in agility sports or show them off to win a ribbon, your dog should be registered with a kennel club. Then, there are perks that the kennel club offers for registered members. Some offer specialized packages delivered to your doorstep. Others might come with pet insurance, free vet visits or eligibility to earn titles.  Registration can also provide proof of ownership and access to microchips, which help with identifying your puppy if they’re lost. Another consideration to make is whether or not you’re legally required to register with your state or municipality. You could face fines if you do not. Legally Required Licensing The United States does not have a federal licensing requirement for dog owners; however, most states have their own requirements. In Pennsylvania, for example, all dogs that are 3 months or older must be licensed. Licenses are available at country treasurers and other licensing agencies. The fees are relatively inexpensive and help to fund dog wardens, who inspect kennels and prosecute puppy mills. If you fail to license your dog, you could face hundreds of dollars in fines, so check out your state’s licensing requirements before you adopt a puppy. Aside from statewide requirements for dog ownership & licensing, your municipality might also have licensing requirements. Some states may even expressly pass authority down to the county or municipal level. Indiana is one such state, which leaves it to cities like Terre Huate to issue licenses. If you rent your home, you are obligated to check with your landlord about any restrictions they have on pets. Although it’s not exactly a license or registration, the landlord must still issue permission to have a dog live on their property. They may restrict the size and breed of dogs allowed or prohibit them entirely, except for service dogs. Registering a Purebred Puppy With a Kennel Club As mentioned above, the requirements for registering a puppy depend on the kennel club you choose. There are 5 kennel clubs in North America that you should consider registering with, the American Kennel Club, the Continental Kennel Club, the United Kennel Club, America’s Pet Registry, and the American Canine Association. Registering a Purebred with the American Kennel Club (AKC) The American Kennel Club (AKC) is the largest and oldest kennel club in the United States. Registration with the AKC is seen as the highest quality and most exclusive registration available. This is because they require both parents to be registered, along with the grandparents. This ensures that every AKC puppy is 100% purebred. To see if your puppy qualifies for AKC membership, you’ll need to ask the breeder about the registration of both parents.  AKC breeders will register litters with the AKC website before you ever purchase a puppy with them. They’ll provide you with a registration number, and some may even pre-pay for you. Once they provide that info to you, head over to the AKC website to register your puppy. Registering a Purebred with the Continental Kennel Club (CKC) Registering with the Continental Kennel Club (CKC) is a bit easier than the AKC. As long as the mother is registered, the father can be a non-member certified in a number of other ways. It is also possible to register a puppy that is in another recognized club or when both parents are in another recognized club, there are just a few extra steps to take. Learn more by visiting the CKC website. To see if your puppy qualifies for CKC membership, ask your breeder. Once again, the breeder will provide you with a registration number on a printed-out application with their signature. You’ll then take this number to the CKC website to register your puppy. Registering a Purebred with the United Kennel Club (UKC) Like the CKC, the United Kennel Club (UKC) will register puppies with fewer restrictions than the AKC. As long as the mother is registered, the father can be a non-member who is registered with a recognized club. A dog registered with a recognized club can also apply for membership in the UKC. To see if your puppy qualifies for UKC membership, ask your breeder. Your breeder may or may not provide you with a litter registration number. They could breed parents who are both UKC members without registering the litter. In this case, ask for both of the parents’ registration numbers. Then, take either your puppy’s registration number or both parents’ numbers and register your puppy online. Registering a Purebred with America’s Pet Registry (APRI) America’s Pet Registry (APRI) is another club that verifies a purebred puppy when both parents are also registered, similar to the AKC. It is slightly easier than the AKC, however, because parents registered at another recognized club can dual register with APRI. Your breeder will register a litter by submitting both parents’ APRI numbers and receiving a number for each of their puppies. They will need to provide you with this number in order for you to register your puppy. Without it, you’re unable to register the puppy. Once you have your puppy’s registration number and the breeder’s name and address, you can head to the APRI website to complete the registration. Registering a Purebred with the American Canine Association (ACA) The American Canine Association (ACA) is both a pet registry and a health certification club, where the dogs are certified to be free of genetic health conditions by veterinarians. Membership is only available to puppies whose parents are ACA members or dogs with at least 3 degrees of pedigree from another organization. There are no alternative ACA memberships for mixed dogs or dogs without 3 degrees of pedigree. Your breeder will fill out a litter registration form and a health certification form with a veterinarian. Then, they’ll have the option to prepay for the registration or pass the fee to the new owner. Be sure to check with your breeder if your puppy’s registration is prepaid or not. Once you know which registration to complete, take the registration application number and complete your registration online. Registering a Mixed Puppy or One Without Paperwork As seen above, registering a puppy typically requires two things: for them to be purebred and for you to have the paperwork from the breeder. What if your puppy is mixed or you never received paperwork from the breeder? Most clubs offer alternative membership options in these situations. They offer many of the same benefits without confirming the pedigree of your puppy. Registering a Mixed or Paperless Puppy with the American Kennel Club (AKC) If your puppy doesn’t have two AKC parents or if they’re mixed, you don’t qualify for full membership to the AKC. You can, however, participate in one of their other memberships, the Purebred Alternative Listing (PAL) or Canine Partners. PAL is registration for a purebred without paperwork and/or parents who aren’t registered. Canine Partners is a registration for mixed dogs or any who are disqualified from AKC or PAL for another reason. Both programs allow you to participate in AKC events, like agility sports. Registering a Mixed or Paperless Puppy with the Continental Kennel Club (CKC) If your puppy doesn’t qualify for CKC membership but is purebred, you can apply for membership with a PAW Evaluation Application. You’ll need to submit proof of breed by submitting 5 photographs and 2 witness signatures. Then, the club will determine if your dog qualifies. If they reject the PAW application or if you know your puppy is mixed, you can submit a Non-Purebred Canine Registration Application. This application requires 3 photographs and 2 witness signatures. Registering a Mixed or Paperless Puppy with the United Kennel Club (UKC) The United Kennel Club offers Performance Listing (PL) membership for both mixed-breed and paperless puppies. The PL membership allows your puppy to participate in UKC sports, such as precision coursing events. Registering a Paperless Puppy with America’s Pet Registry (APRI) America’s Pet Registry does not provide full benefits to a dog unless you can prove at least 3 generations of pedigree. This is available if both parents are with APRI or through dual registration with another club that confirms the pedigree. Without proof, you can still register your puppy but it will be with Pet Records of America (PRA), a subsidiary of APRI. Looking for a New Puppy? Are you interested in finding a new furry family member? There are thousands of breeders registered with kennel clubs who advertise purebred and mixed puppies on our website. Browse their listings today.

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Aug 03, 2022

What to Look For When Choosing a Veterinarian for Your Dog

You don’t want to wait to find a vet until your pet needs one. If you know you are going to adopt or buy a puppy, start researching local animal clinics before bringing your new furry friend home. Read on to learn what qualities to look for in a veterinarian and save our list of local animal clinics and hospitals to check out in Indiana, Ohio, and Pennsylvania! Experienced & Licensed To start everything off, you want to make sure the veterinarians you’re researching have the licensing, experience, and education required to perform veterinary services. Vets should have a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree but don’t be alarmed if your vet has a Veterinary Medical Doctor (VMD) degree. While other universities go with the title DVM, the University of Pennsylvania uses VMD; however, both DVM and VMD degrees are on the same level. Additionally, you should seek out animal clinics that have registered veterinary technicians, which are the vet equivalent of registered nurses in hospitals. These licensed technicians have completed formal education and mandatory training that’s vital to their role. Vet Specialties Find a vet that specializes and excels in the care of dogs and puppies (and other animals you may have). These vets will have more experience working with dogs and the conditions that affect them. For example, if you have a dog breed that is susceptible to multiple health conditions (like a Rottweiler, French Bulldog, Boxer, or Bernese Mountain Dog), you’ll especially want to find a vet that specializes in working with that breed and its conditions. Aligned Values Finding a vet that has the same values concerning animals as you is important. The vet’s values surrounding alternative medicine, spaying & neutering, TNR, euthanasia, and cancer, among other things, should align with your own beliefs on the subjects. Having a vet with aligning values is important for owners seeking an animal clinic that is focused on preventive care and catching problems before they occur. You’ll also want your vet to see pets as special family members. Positive Vet & Technician Demeanor You and your dog should like the vet, technicians, and staff. While your dog may not be best friends with their vet, it’s very important that they don’t hate them. If you have a pet with vet anxiety, the animal clinics should know how to handle and calm them. The vet and staff should be kind to your pet and treat them with respect. Likewise, your vet should not have an ego that prevents them from being open to second opinions and referring your pet to a trusted specialist when needed. Your pet’s health and happiness should be important to your vet and vet technicians. Because pets can’t tell us how they’re feeling, pet owners usually have a lot of questions. You’ll want to find an animal clinic with vets and staff that are patient, friendly, helpful, and understanding when you have questions. Vets, technicians, and staff should take the time to listen to your concerns with empathy and care, as well as give understandable explanations when able. Clean & Up-to-Date Facility Just like you’d want doctors' offices and hospitals to be clean, you should look for an animal clinic that is clean and sanitized. The cleanliness of an animal clinic should be evident from the parking lot, sidewalk, waiting room, and all the way into the examination room. The outside cleanliness of the facility, like the parking lot and sidewalk, is important as this is a high-traffic area for dogs coming and going from the vet clinic. Many dog owners walk their dogs outside their animal clinic to take a bathroom break and burn off nervous energy. Keeping this area clean is respectful to dogs and their owners as it keeps everyone healthy and safe. Furthermore, in addition to using sanitized equipment, vet supplies should be up to date, sealed when appropriate, and unbroken. Continued Learning Choosing an animal clinic that values continued learning among its staff and veterinarians helps ensure quality care in the present and future. You should aim to find a vet that stays up-to-date with veterinary practices and research. Additionally, it’s good to find an animal clinic that encourages and provides the means for their technicians and staff to further their education in veterinary care. Just like you wouldn’t want to go to a hospital where the doctors are following outdated procedures when better ones exist, your pet should also receive care that reflects the best present-day practices. Hours of Operation & After-Hours Care Find an animal clinic with operating hours that work with your schedule. If you can only make an appointment before or after work, find a vet office that’s open in the early morning, evenings, and/or on weekends. Look for an animal clinic that has some version of emergency services or referral. You’ll want to know ahead of time what to do if you need emergency vet care. Find out if any of the vets do house visits (this isn’t a requirement, but it’s definitely a plus!) Does the animal clinic have someone on call for emergencies after hours? Do they have a list of emergency referrals on their website? If your dog has a condition that is beyond what your vet has experience in, or if your vet can’t fit your dog into their schedule, they should refer you to another veterinarian who can help. AAHA Accreditation A big plus for an animal clinic is accreditation from the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA). Being accredited by the AAHA further ensures that the vet office is good at what they do, accomplished, and trustworthy. In order for an animal clinic to become accredited with the AAHA, it needs to meet around 900 standards. These standards include dentistry, surgery, anesthesia, labs, medical records, pharmacy, pain management, sanitation, and animal care. An accreditation with AAHA lets you know an animal clinic has been evaluated and approved for having exceptional care. While choosing an AAHA-accredited animal clinic is a good choice, don’t get stuck on this. AAHA accreditation is good to have but isn’t a requirement as there are many good animal clinics without it. Accepting New Clients When looking for a new vet you also need to make sure that they are accepting new clients and can see you when needed. If you have a new puppy, you don’t want to wait months before you can get a wellness exam and a new client appointment. If the animal clinic you’re set on isn’t currently accepting new clients, you can always switch to them later on. Just remember to request copies of your pet’s medical records to forward to your new animal clinic when you switch. Positive Word of Mouth One of the best ways to find a high-quality vet is through recommendations from friends, family, and neighbors. You can also ask other dog owners at dog parks, local forums, dog groomers, and doggy daycares. Checking reviews online and from friends and family will help you decide if a vet is right for you and your pet. When getting recommendations from friends and family, ask about the waiting room, how you enter and exit with your pet (some vets have a special procedure for this to keep animal anxiety low), what their prices are like, what the staff is like, and if there are any financial or payment plans available.   Finding a veterinarian that works well with you and your pets is invaluable. If you aren’t happy with the animal clinic you’re at, checking out different vets in the area is recommended. Making sure you and your pets are happy, safe, and healthy is a priority! Download our list of animal clinics and hospitals in Indiana, Ohio, and Pennsylvania to discover vets in your area. Looking to add a new puppy to your family? Find puppies for sale near you!

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Aug 03, 2022

Labrador Retrievers: The AKC’s #1 Breed for Over 20 Years

The Labrador Retriever is one of the most popular dog breeds in the United States and for good reason. Labradors have ranked #1 on the American Kennel Club’s (AKC) most popular dog breeds list for over 20 years! This versatile breed has done everything from working alongside fishermen to being a popular pick among service dogs. Considering adding a Labrador Retriever to your family? Read on to find out if the Labrador is right for you. Breed History The Labrador Retriever comes from Newfoundland, a province of Canada, where the breed was a waterfowl retriever, fish retriever, and companion to fishermen. Labradors would also help fishermen by pulling nets and ropes. Originally Labs were called St John’s Dogs after Newfoundland’s capital, St. John’s. Knowledge of Labrador Retrievers spread outside Newfoundland when English noblemen visited Canada and fell in love with the dogs. The English soon brought Labradors to England and began breeding them. The Lab’s popularity spread across the world and to the United States where they were officially recognized by the AKC in 1917. Today, the Labrador Retriever remains a popular dog breed in America and acts as a service dog, search and rescue dog, bomb detector, drug detector, and adoring family pet. Labrador Retriever Characteristics Appearance & Coat The Labrador Retriever is a large breed with a height of 21 to 25 inches and a weight between 55 to 80 pounds. These dogs have a broad, square-like body with floppy ears, wide snouts, big eyes, and a thick, otter-like tail that rests downward or straight out. Labs have a double coat that is relatively easy to groom and maintain. Their top coat is short, straight, and dense while their undercoat is weatherproof and soft. The AKC officially recognizes that Labs have 3 colors: black, chocolate, and yellow. The Labrador Retrievers' waterproof coats were ideal for the Canadian climate as the thickness and shortness of their coats gave Labs the ability to retrieve waterfowl and fish without their fur becoming frozen. Additionally, the Labradors' thick tails help them swim and turn in water the same way rudders work with boats. Temperament Labradors are friendly companions that are kind, calm, and love people. Labs are perfect family dogs as they are incredibly sweet, companionable, and great with other pets and children. These dogs adore kids and are extremely patient and enduring with the way children play. However, no matter how loving a breed is toward kids it’s important to always take precautions and teach both your dog and children how to treat each other. Health When bought from reputable breeders, Labrador Retrievers are generally very healthy and live around 10-12 years. Legitimate breeders will have their dam and stud dogs checked for health issues like heart conditions, hereditary conditions, eye problems, elbow dysplasia, and hip dysplasia before they are used in breeding. Additionally, Labrador Retrievers can have a hereditary condition called exercise-induced collapse (EIC) that shows up in early adulthood and affects their ability to exercise and play. Because this is a hereditary condition, it is not common among responsible breeders as they test their dams and studs. Like other large dogs, Labradors are susceptible to bloat, hip dysplasia, and elbow dysplasia. Additionally, Lab owners need to be aware that these dogs are big foodies and are susceptible to obesity if overfed. Similarly, Labradors will try to eat anything they decide is food, whether it’s actually edible or not. Caring for a Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever’s Ideal Home Labs are social dogs that love being around people and don’t enjoy being left alone. This breed loves to be part of the family and be included in family activities. It's ideal that if an owner travels frequently, their Labrador travels with them. Because Labs are so friendly, being a watchdog is impossible for them. Outgoing and desiring to please others, the Labrador Retriever would rather become friends with intruders instead of sounding the alarm. Labradors need owners who are active and playful just like them. Owners who are unable to meet their Lab’s energy requirements can look into doggy daycare, dog parks, a fenced-in backyard, and/or hiring a dog walker. Training Best Practices Labs need early socialization and training to combat the high energy and strength they gain when they are older. Because they grow up to be very strong and can overpower their owners, early training is essential for Labrador Retrievers. Training a Labrador isn’t a difficult task as this breed loves to please and is intelligent. These are adaptable, hardworking dogs that love people and are devoted to their owners. This breed can adjust to almost any task given to them which is evident from their success in dock diving, agility, obedience, and tracking competitions. Exercise Needs Owners should expect to give their Labrador around 30 to 60 minutes of exercise every day. That being said, Labradors aren’t very good at knowing their limits. This breed may keep playing and working until they exhaust themselves. Owners should know the signs of exhaustion and overexertion in dogs to help their pups remain comfortable and in good health. During walks and play, it’s important to give your Labrador breaks to rest and drink water. Labs are working dogs who need to be kept busy or else they'll become overexcitable and destructive. Your Labrador will need more physical and mental exercise than just a daily walk. Swimming, fetching, and mental enrichment puzzles will all help your dog let out energy. Evident in their name, Labrador Retrievers love activities that include retrieving and swimming. Because Labradors love retrieving, giving them toys to chew on and carry around in their mouths will keep them happy. Grooming & Hygiene Despite having a short coat, this breed sheds a lot. Brushing your dog regularly can help keep their loose hair at bay. During shedding season, Labradors should be brushed daily. Outside of shedding season, brushing can be done on a weekly basis. Additionally, Labs should be bathed around every 2 months and their ears should be checked and cleaned on a weekly basis to check for signs of an ear infection. With so many great qualities and a wonderful temperament, Labrador Retrievers make fantastic pets for people in various stages of life. These highly esteemed, well-loved, and adorable dogs are the perfect additions to any home. Want to add this affectionate breed to your home? Find Labrador Retriever puppies for sale near you!

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Jul 27, 2022

Keeping Your Dog Safe In & Around Pools

Lots of dogs enjoy swimming and playing in pools with their owners. If you have a dog that loves to cannonball in the pool with you, you might be wondering if it’s okay for your dog to be paddling away by your side. While there are measures you need to take to keep your dog safe while swimming, the effort is well worth it to ensure your dog is protected and comfortable before, during, and after splashing around in the pool. Teach Your Dog How to Swim It’s unsafe for owners to throw their dogs into pools and assume that swimming will be innate. This can be really dangerous as not all dogs enjoy swimming or are able to swim. In fact, researching your dog’s breed and best swimming practices is advised as some breeds cannot swim due to their build. Dogs that are inexperienced swimmers will try to use just their front paws to swim. You can help teach your dog to swim by holding the back end of its body until it learns to use both its front and back legs. Similarly, you can notice your dog is struggling to swim by watching its back end. If your dog’s back end begins to dip and they are mainly swimming with their front legs, it’s time to give them a break on land. Show Your Dog How to Enter & Exit Let your dog enter at their own pace when they’re ready, praising and encouraging your pup each step of the way. You can further encourage your dog to enter the pool by going in first yourself and bringing toys along. However, do not force a dog to go in the pool if they don’t want to. Because there are few points of entry and exit that are accessible to dogs, getting out of the pool can be difficult for your pup. It’s best to have an easy way for your dog to enter and exit the pool such as shallow steps or a ramp. Any dog swimming in an unfamiliar pool should be shown beforehand where they can get out. Letting a dog swim in a pool without showing them how to exit can tragically make a dog more susceptible to drowning as they aren’t familiar with how to escape. Pool Chemical Safety Dogs are able to swim in pools with chlorine but should never be allowed to drink the pool water. Keeping a dish with clean water out for your dog will help deter them from using pool water to stay hydrated. Additionally, chlorine can make your dog’s skin dry and irritated so it’s a good idea to inspect them for signs of discomfort and sensitive areas. Some owners may notice a slight change in the color and softness of their dog’s coat. This is a typical side effect of dogs swimming in pools but as long as your dog’s skin isn’t overly dry and irritated, this isn’t a cause for alarm. When it comes time to clean your pool, do not let your dog outside with you. This will help prevent your dog from coming into contact with and ingesting chemicals. It’s vital that you store pool chemicals in a locked location where animals and children cannot get into them. Be Cautious of Dry Drowning Dog owners should be aware of dry drowning, also referred to as secondary drowning, which is a condition that can affect all animals and even people. Dry drowning can happen when a dog becomes exhausted while swimming, begins to struggle, starts to panic, and accidentally inhales a large amount of water. This water may then enter the dog’s lungs, creating serious issues that can be fatal. Signs you should take your dog to an emergency animal hospital for possible water inhalation include coughing, chest pain, trouble breathing, breathlessness, and non-characteristic inactivity. Symptoms may not show up right away so if you suspect your dog inhaled lots of pool water you should take them to an emergency vet right away. After Swimming Care To help reduce the risk of your dog’s skin being irritated from pool chemicals, rinse off your dog each time it finishes swimming. Likewise, the material of the flooring around pools can be rough on your dog’s paws, so their paws and nails should be inspected for any tearing or bleeding. Finally, dry and clean your dog’s ears to protect against infections. This is especially important if your dog has floppy ears as you don’t want moisture to become trapped in them. Drying off your dog and removing any water-soaked items like a collar or life jacket will help keep them comfortable and free of rubbing. Added Precautions Canine Life Jackets Buying a life jacket for your dog is highly recommended. There are many kinds to choose from, but it’s best to go with a life jacket that has a handle on the top so you can pull your dog out of the water if needed. Whether your dog doesn’t swim or loves the water, having your pup wear a life jacket around pools and bodies of water is encouraged. Pool Alarms & Fences Setting up pool alarms will help alert you if your dog accidentally falls into the pool. In addition to installing a pool alarm, putting a fence around the pool can prevent accidents or unsupervised swimming from occurring. Pool Covers When choosing a pool cover you should avoid floating covers. These covers are dangerous as children and animals can get stuck underneath and are unable to escape. Dogs can easily fall in after trying to walk on a floating pool cover since it can look like solid ground. After falling in with the pool cover, it’s near impossible for your dog to get back out. A safety pool cover made to withstand animals and people walking on it is the best choice. Hot Tubs While your dog can do laps in the pool, you should not let your dog take a dip with you in the hot tub. Hot tubs are too hot for dogs to handle and can lead to overheating and heat stroke since they are underwater and unable to cool themselves down. Time spent in a hot tub may do wonders for you but will have the opposite effect on your dog. Always Supervise Your Dog Around Pools Under no circumstances should your dog swim in a pool without supervision. Even if your dog loves swimming, is wearing a life jacket, and has years of experience, they can still tire themselves out and struggle to leave the pool. You need to keep a close eye on your dog as well to make sure they aren’t drinking the pool water and don’t inhale a large amount of water that could lead to dry drowning. Not only does your dog need to be supervised when in the pool, but your dog should be supervised when they are outside of the pool too. Because they are still near the pool, you need to keep an eye on your dog to make sure they don’t accidentally fall in or try to take a drink. Even if you are just letting your dog out for a quick run around the yard or bathroom break, you still need to make sure they are safe and stay away from the pool.   Dogs' reactions to swimming in pools will change depending on the dog. Some dogs may do fine with chlorine while others will have more sensitive skin. Remember to always supervise your dog around pools and if they don’t enjoy swimming or the chemicals are too much for them, don’t force them into the pool. Overall, you know your dog best. If something doesn’t seem right after they’ve been swimming, contact your dog’s vet. Now that you know how to keep your dog safe in the pool, grab some toys and enjoy splashing around in the sun with your pup! Check out new arrivals on Lancaster Puppies and stay up to date on canine care with our blog.

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Jun 23, 2022

2022 Guide to Creating a Whelping Box

Creating a whelping box for your pregnant dog provides her with a clean, safe place to have her puppies. It’s recommended to have the box and room set up before your dog goes into labor. Similarly, you should introduce your pregnant dog to the whelping box a few weeks, but no later than 5 days, before her due date so she has time to become accustomed to it. This whelping box guide covers the various aspects of preparing a whelping area for your pregnant dog and her litter. Location The room where you set up the whelping box should be climate-controlled, quiet, low-traffic, and draft-free. This room should also have doors that close so children and other pets cannot enter. If the whelping box is in a room where clean-up would be difficult (like a room with carpet), putting a protective cover over the floor will keep it safe from messes. As you begin setting up the whelping box, let your pregnant dog in the room with you so she can become familiar with it. Size Whelping box sizes will vary depending on the dog breed’s size. The box should be small enough so the puppies are not spread out and far from each other, but big enough that the mother dog has room to move around. Your dog should be able to lay down, stretch, and still have room for her puppies to feed (usually around 1-2 feet of space). That being said, be mindful of the size you are choosing since a whelping box that is too big can prevent the puppies from being close to their mother and staying warm. Walls There should be walls on all sides of the whelping box that are sturdy enough to keep out drafts. These walls need to be low enough for the mother dog to come and go as she pleases, but tall enough so the puppies cannot escape. When choosing or making a whelping box, make sure you go with one that has bumper rails (also called pig rails) on the inside walls. Having bumper rails around the interior of the whelping box helps ensure the mother dog doesn’t accidentally smother her puppies when lying down. Material Between giving birth and puppies not being housebroken, whelping boxes need to be easy to clean regularly. Plastic material is usually preferred over wood because it doesn’t trap germs and can be quickly cleaned. Whatever material you choose to go with, you’ll want the top to be open or removed so it’s easier to reach and handle the puppies on your end. Furthermore, you can DIY or buy a whelping box; however, if you decide to DIY your whelping box you shouldn't paint it as this can be hazardous to the puppies. Heat After the puppies are born, the whelping box should be around 85 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit for a few days. Water and microwave-heated products can be used to keep puppies warm. However, you’ll want to keep an eye on these so you know when they need to be warmed up again. Heat lamps and heating pads are great for keeping puppies warm (but not too warm). If you use a heating pad, place it under a whelping mat to avoid direct contact with the puppies’ sensitive skin. If you have a heat lamp, it should be installed in a place where it will not hinder your dog from being able to stand and walk around. Additionally, having your heat lamp positioned in the middle of the whelping box encourages puppies to stay away from the walls. Floor & Bedding The floor padding of the whelping box should be waterproof to keep the puppies warm and dry. You can do this by putting a waterproof mat on the floor and placing a whelping mat on top. Loose bedding materials like straw and pine shavings shouldn’t be used in a whelping box because they can be too harsh on the newborn puppies’ skin and eyes. Likewise, avoid keeping bedding like blankets, sheets, and towels in your whelping box as puppies can accidentally become stuck in them and suffocate. Using whelping mats or non-bunched-up items is recommended. You should invest in more than 1 whelping mat as you’ll need to rotate them to be cleaned. Whelping Supplies Remember that even with a whelping box you’ll still need to be present when your dog gives birth in case of an emergency or necessary assistance. Keep vanilla ice cream or yogurt on hand to give the mother dog between birthing puppies so her calcium, energy, and milk production levels stay up. Some tools you’ll want on hand include surgical gloves, a dog thermometer, sterilized scissors and unwaxed dental floss for umbilical cords, a kitchen scale to weigh the puppies, plenty of towels for when your dog is giving birth, puppy identification collars, and a suction device (like a bulb aspirator/syringe) in case a puppy’s airway becomes blocked.   At the end of the day, your dog will decide where she feels safest giving birth. You can introduce her to the whelping box you’ve created but just know she might find somewhere else to have her puppies. If your dog gives birth at a different spot, simply carry the puppies to the whelping box you created. This will keep the puppies together and the mother dog will follow. Puppies should remain in the whelping box with their mother for around 2-3 weeks until their eyes and ears are no longer closed. Finally, if it is reusable, you can clean up the whelping box and save it for next time! For more information on caring for dogs of all life stages, check out our blog.

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Jun 20, 2022

The Miniature Poodle: A Small Dog With a Big Personality

Miniature Poodles have been used as retrieving dogs, circus dogs, show dogs, and family dogs among many other roles. With so many skills and abilities, Mini Poodles continue to be one of the most popular dog breeds today and are quite versatile. Whether you want a dog that can compete in agility competitions, be your jogging buddy, or become your kid’s best friend, the Miniature Poodle may be just what you’re looking for! Breed History Although the Miniature Poodle is famously associated with France, Poodles originally come from Germany where their name also derives from. In Germany, the Poodle was known as “pudelhund” which combines the word “pudel”, meaning “puddle” and “hund”, which means “dog”. The word “pudel” comes from the term “pudelin” which means “to splash”. Named for their job, Miniature Poodles were bred to be working dogs that assisted hunters in retrieving waterfowl. Mini Poodles, as well as Toy and Standard Poodles, are proficient swimmers and have been retrieving waterfowl for centuries. This breed has been around for quite some time, dating back to the 1700s and 1800s. Additionally, throughout the decades Poodles of all sizes have been pets to nobles in France, performed in circuses, and sniffed out truffles. As evidenced throughout its history, the Miniature Poodle has no trouble adapting to new environments and situations. Miniature Poodle Characteristics Appearance & Coat Miniature Poodles usually have a weight of around 10 to 15 pounds and a height of 10 to 15 inches. These dogs can have many coat colors including black, white, gray, cream, red, yellow, and brown. Along with Toy and Standard Poodles, the Miniature Poodle is known for having a fancy, iconic coat trim with some parts shaved and others puffed out. This style actually can be traced back to the Poodle’s waterfowl retrieving days as hunters chose this trim to keep them warm, protect internal organs, and decrease coat restrictions while swimming. Additionally, these dogs are perfect pets for people who suffer from allergies. The Mini Poodle’s curly and low-shedding coat makes this breed popular among owners looking for a hypoallergenic dog. Non-surprisingly, Miniature Poodles are frequently used in breeding to create allergy-friendly designer breeds. Temperament Miniature Poodles like being around people and are friendly dogs. These pups love to cuddle, play, and can be quite vocal! Mini Poodles make fantastic family pets as they get along well with kids and other dogs. As always, remember to practice safe introductions and socialization when integrating a new pet into your family. Despite being social and friendly toward humans, Miniature Poodles have the potential to become anxious around strangers if they are not socialized enough in their early years. So despite loving people, this breed still needs proper socialization. Overall, these dogs are very devoted, affectionate, and happy, making great companions to any family. Health Miniature Poodles don’t have too many health issues and are fairly healthy dogs with a lifespan of around 10 to 18 years. Health conditions this breed can be susceptible to include joint and bone problems such as luxating patella and Legg-Calve-Perthes, Von Willebrand’s Disease, Progressive Retinal Atrophy, epilepsy, and dental disease. Miniature Poodles should be bought from reputable breeders who get their dogs checked for hip dysplasia, eye conditions, and bone issues. Caring for a Miniature Poodle The Miniature Poodle’s Ideal Home Mini Poodles will find their best fit in owners who are active and can handle high-energy dogs. These dogs need a good amount of physical and mental exercise to stay content, so their owners should be able to provide that. This breed will thrive in a home with frequent trips to the dog park or a fenced-in backyard. Because of their size, these dogs are compatible with apartment living. However, just make sure if you’re living in an apartment that your dog is getting plenty of exercise. Additionally, Mini Poodles should have owners who can spend time with them. This breed can experience separation anxiety and doesn’t like being away from their families, so having a home where these dogs will receive a lot of attention is ideal. Training Best Practices Mini Poodles are extremely smart dogs. Their high intelligence, combined with their people-pleasing nature, makes training a breeze. Training is a great way to keep your Miniature Poodle entertained and busy. You don’t need to be entering a competition to teach your dog something fun and new (although Mini Poodles are great at dog competitions and shows!) As long as you aim to keep them engaged and having fun in training, your Mini Poodle will be happy to listen and obey your commands. Exercise Needs Miniature Poodles, like Toy and Standard Poodles, are active and full of energy. This breed needs more than just an hour walk every day. Whether it’s jogging, swimming, playing, figuring out puzzles, or walking, this breed loves to be kept busy. Mini Poodles are especially fond of retrieving items so play that involves throwing and fetching is a great choice. These dogs need to be kept busy with physical and mental exercise to keep them from becoming bored. If they do not have the opportunity to burn off all their energy, Mini Poodles can become very hyper and loud. You’ll want to make sure you have more activities than just your daily walk to keep your pup entertained! Grooming & Hygiene Owners looking for a tidy and clean dog should look no further than the Miniature Poodle. These light-shedding and low-drooling dogs don’t require constant cleaning up after them. While shedding and drooling are low maintenance with Mini Poodles, their grooming requires more work and time. To prevent coat matting, this breed needs to be brushed every day and should be trimmed every 4 to 6 weeks. However, owners looking for a lower maintenance coat can give their Mini Poodle a shorter trim that won’t require as much brushing. Miniature Poodles with short trimmed coats can be brushed on a weekly basis as opposed to daily. The Miniature Poodles wraps up all the perks of owning a Poodle into a smaller size. These dogs fit well into many types of lifestyles as they can live in city apartments or in the countryside. Found yourself imagining owning your own little fluffy puff of fun? Check out Miniature Poodles for sale on Lancaster Puppies!

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Jun 10, 2022

Preparing Your Dog for a New Baby

A new baby is a big life transition for all, including your pets. It’s best to start preparing your dog for the arrival of a baby early on. The sooner you start making modifications to reflect what life will be like with an infant, the better adjusted your dog will be. From introducing your dog to new baby items to planning the first time they meet, we’ve detailed how you can prepare your dog for a new addition to the family. Work on Training & Commands Before the baby arrives your dog should respond to commands telling them to sit, leave items, stay, not jump, stop barking, and listen when told no. You don’t want your dog running to grab or play with any baby items that fall on the floor! For dogs that are clingy, also known as “velcro-dogs”, you’ll want to train your dog not to be glued to your side. With your pup being less attached to you wherever you go, you won’t have to worry about tripping over them while carrying an infant or baby supplies. If your dog is not already crate trained, you’ll want to do crate training. Crate training is valuable as it makes leaving the house easier, creates a safe place for your dog, and is good for emergencies when urgent crating is necessary. Preparing for a baby is a busy time, so if time and energy are limited you can always enroll your dog in obedience training classes. Begin New Schedule Understand that a new baby is also a big transition for your dog. Your pup will be getting less attention and their daily schedule will change along with your own. After the baby arrives, you probably won’t be able to walk your dog around the time they are used to. You can make this switch now so that any changes to walking your dog will be a normal routine by the time you bring your infant home. Along with schedule changes, if you don’t have an automatic feeder, a new baby may switch up routine mealtime for your dog as well. It’s good to practice feeding your dog at different times to get them used to changes in their meal schedule. For example, giving your dog dinner around 5:30 pm instead of the usual 5 pm. Any rules your dog will have after the baby is born should be enforced as soon as possible. For instance, if your bedroom will be off-limits you should make that change now. Prepare for Attention Changes If your dog was your only “baby” prior to the welcoming of a new child, it may be hard for your pup to adjust to less attention. However, you can prepare your dog for this change ahead of time. To do this you’ll need to practice giving your dog less attention throughout the day. It may be difficult to do this at first but remember that it’ll be even harder if there’s a drastic drop in attention when the baby is brought home. Once the baby is born, if you only pay attention to your dog when your baby isn’t in the room, you may unintentionally reinforce negative behavior. Your dog will begin to recognize that your baby is the reason for the decrease in attention and can become jealous. Thankfully, this problem can be easily avoided and solved. When you and your baby are in the same room as your dog, give them attention too. This attention can take various forms such as talking, light playing, and/or petting your dog. Introduce Baby Items As soon as you start buying and receiving large baby items, such as baby gates, strollers, car seat carriers, and baby swings, you can begin exposing your dog to these new, exciting items. Setting up the baby’s equipment and nursery ahead of time will give your dog time to become familiar with the items’ new scents, appearances, and sounds. Pushing the stroller around, turning the baby swing on, carrying the baby car carrier, and setting out the baby’s playmat are all things you can do to prepare your dog. Likewise, wearing a bit of baby soap or other products the baby will smell like can help your dog grow familiar with the new scents. Crying Desensitization A big part of having a new baby is regular, constant crying. Help get your dog accustomed to these new sounds by playing videos of baby noises and crying. You can give your dog treats during this desensitization to reward their calm behavior. By giving your dog treats, they will begin to associate the sound of a baby crying as something positive and not stress-inducing. Just make sure the video volume isn’t too loud where it’ll create stress and fear in your dog! If you are able, it’s highly recommended to have your dog spend time around children and infants before the baby arrives. Spending time at a park or with family members and friends who have kids (with permission) will help your dog become better adjusted to being around children. You can even take your dog for walks alongside a stroller to practice walking your pup with a baby. Bringing the Baby Home Before taking your baby home for the first time, take a blanket or piece of clothing the infant has worn or been wrapped in for your dog to sniff. This helps your dog become accustomed to the new baby’s smell. This can be done before you leave the hospital and should take place before introducing your dog to your baby. When it’s time to head home, it’s helpful to have someone who can enter the house before you, leash your dog, and hold the leash while you enter. Every time the dog calmly interacts with the baby, give your dog a treat to reward their behavior. Additionally, for the first couple of days with your new baby, it can be helpful to keep your dog on a leash indoors. Meeting the Baby When introducing the family’s new addition to your dog, express that this is a joyous thing and not something your pup should feel anxious or stressed about. Continue to reward and praise your dog each time they calmly and gently interact with the baby. Giving your dog plenty of treats when they spend time around the baby will help them associate the infant with good things. If you are tense during your pet and baby’s first meeting, your dog will pick up on your apprehension. Babies’ immune systems are not very strong so you should keep your dog from licking your baby’s face. Dogs may do this out of excitement, anxiety, or to assert dominance. Your pup’s mouth is full of various germs and bacteria that can cause sickness in your infant. In addition to reducing the risk of illness and bacteria, your dog licking your baby’s face can lead to biting if the dog feels it needs to assert dominance. With proper training, you’ll be able to teach your dog that licking the baby should not be done. Overall, preparing for a baby requires time, energy, and work. If you find yourself overwhelmed or want to keep yourself from reaching that point, there’s no shame in getting help. You can ask friends and family if they can petsit or take your dog for walks after the baby comes. There are also plenty of resources that exist for finding pet sitters, doggy daycare, dog walkers, dog training classes, errand runners, and other task helpers at Rover, Wag!, and Care.com. You’re all experiencing this new adventure together so make sure to include your four-legged companion(s) in your preparations! For more resources on going through life with a dog by your side, check out our blog.

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Jun 01, 2022

A Guide to Recognizing & Preventing Canine Parvovirus

Canine parvovirus, also referred to as parvo, is a highly contagious and life-threatening virus that affects the gastrointestinal systems of dogs. If you spend a lot of time around dogs and puppies, chances are you’ve heard about this devastating virus. While there’s currently no cure for dogs who contract parvo, there are treatment methods that can help. Staying informed and taking preventive measures to keep your pups healthy and safe from parvo is one of the best decisions you can make for your dogs. 1. Understand the Virus Parvovirus targets dogs’ stomachs and small intestines. This virus impairs the immune system, leads to dehydration, and causes white blood cell loss. With the dog’s immune defense lowered, infections caused by the virus can wreak havoc. Parvo can leave a dog impoverished by interacting with the absorption of nutrients, damaging the gut barrier, and harming cells. This virus is extremely serious in puppies as it can harm their hearts, bones, and lymphopoietic tissue. Symptoms of canine parvovirus include: Diarrhea / Bloody Diarrhea Vomiting Fever Low Body Temperature Weakness Dehydration Lethargy Weight Loss Loss of Appetite Bloating Stomach Pain Parvo is passed on through contact with dogs that have the virus, as well as infected items such as toys, water bowls, food bowls, feces, and vomit. Humans can also pass parvovirus to dogs if they’ve been around a dog with parvo. 2. Fully Vaccinate Dogs Against Parvo Puppies between 6 weeks to 6 months old, as well as dogs that have not been vaccinated against parvo, are at a higher risk of getting the virus. Similarly, dogs who are vaccinated but have other medical conditions and a weakened immune system are also at risk. If the dam used in breeding has all her vaccinations up-to-date, puppies in her litter under 6 weeks old will receive antibodies from her. However, these antibodies are not enough to fully protect puppies. It’s a necessity that puppies receive all 3 parvo shots and a booster to protect them from the virus. Puppies should get their first shot around 6 weeks old, the second around 8 weeks, the third around 12 weeks, and the booster around 16 to 20 weeks. When your puppy is 1 year old, they should receive a second booster, and from then on receive a booster around every 3 years. 3. Avoid Public Places Until Fully Vaccinated Parvo is a nasty virus that is very difficult to get rid of. This virus is able to survive and spread despite hot or cold temperatures, even surviving outside during the winter months. Surprisingly, parvovirus can last a long time on its own in both indoor and outdoor environments. Even without a host, parvo can last a minimum of 1 month indoors and anywhere from multiple months to over a year outdoors. Puppies should be kept away from dogs that are not fully vaccinated against parvo. Until your dog has all its parvo vaccinations, dog parks and doggy daycare should be avoided. You can safely socialize your puppy by having playdates at your house or other less-crowded locations with a few dogs that you know are fully vaccinated. Until your puppy has its parvo vaccinations, it’s best to carry and hold them in public places (including vet visits) instead of letting them walk around. Because parvo can remain in the grass, bushes, trees, and various surfaces for months, carrying your puppy where other dogs may have played or used the bathroom will help prevent your puppy from contracting parvovirus. 4. Isolate Dogs Sick with Parvo Dogs and puppies with parvo should be isolated from other dogs, especially those that have not had all their parvovirus vaccinations. Owners and breeders should take preventive measures to keep their dogs and puppies safe. If a dog becomes sick, you must quarantine and isolate them from other dogs to prevent the virus from spreading. A dog quarantined with parvo should remain isolated and away from other dogs until they test negative for the virus and are given the okay from your vet. You should quarantine the sick dog in a room that is comfortable and calm. 5. Keep Areas Clean and Disinfected Thorough cleaning and disinfecting should be done after items and surfaces have been exposed to prevent the virus from continuing to spread. This includes cleaning any areas containing feces, sanitizing contaminated items, and disinfecting kennels. While many household disinfecting products don’t work on parvo, you can use a diluted mixture of 1 part bleach and 30 parts water as well as other parvo-fighting cleaners. When cleaning infected areas, use disposable cleaning products and avoid using mops, which will just hold the virus and continue to spread it. Wearing disposable gloves and shoe covers are also highly recommended when coming in contact with items, areas, and dogs that are suspected of or confirmed to have parvo. Whether a contaminated item is worth cleaning, such as bedding, towels, and clothing, depends on how soiled the item is. If the item is only lightly affected, like clothing you wore while holding a sick puppy or an unsoiled dog bed, wash the item in a washing machine with hot water and strong detergent. Next, run the items through a dryer machine as hanging items to dry is not recommended where parvo is concerned. If an item is heavily soiled, it may be best to throw it away. 6. Contact Vet at Any Signs of Sickness Dogs with parvovirus won’t always show every symptom. In fact, a dog can be infected and only have 1 symptom. Contacting your vet when your puppy or dog shows any sign of sickness can be vital if parvo treatment is needed. This is a fast-acting virus that can kill dogs within 48 to 72 hours after the first sign of symptoms so it's better to err on the side of caution. Parvovirus is diagnosed through a fecal test, and while there is no drug for parvo, vets are able to help the dog survive through other methods. Treatment for canine parvovirus usually involves overnight stays at the vet to keep the dog on a consistent intake of nutrients, fluids, and/or antibiotics through IVs and injections. Because parvo can affect a dog’s bone marrow and white cell count, blood transfusions may also be needed. Having a vet treat your dog’s dehydration caused by parvo is a necessity as excessive diarrhea and vomiting can make a dog go into septic shock. Finding out one of your dogs has parvovirus can be scary; however, treatment and help are available. The ASPCA has put together a helpful parvo response plan that is used by shelters but works just as well for kennels and breeders. When in doubt, never hesitate to contact your veterinarian with concerns and questions. Remember that active prevention and reducing the risk of sickness are the best ways to keep a dog parvo-free. For more information on caring for your pups, check out our blog.

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May 25, 2022

Rottweilers: The Cuddly Watchdogs

With its background as a working dog, the Rottweiler is very intelligent, loyal, and active. Families and owners across the world have taken a liking to Rottweilers as their gentleness is such a contrast to their tough presence. Read on to learn more about this surprisingly cuddly, playful, and sweet breed that has worked as a guard dog for much of its history. Breed History The Rottweiler, also called a Rottie, is a working dog descended from ancient Roman dogs. These dogs were used by Romans to guard armies and drive cattle, a vital role as the cattle were their food provisions. When the Roman Empire collapsed, many dogs were left behind in the town of Rottweil, Germany where they became guard dogs and herding dogs to local butchers. This breed became invaluable to butchers as they could pull carts and protect the merchants from being robbed when making deliveries. When motorized transportation was introduced and small dogs grew in popularity, Rottweilers almost went extinct; however, lovers of this breed kept them alive and expanding. In 1973, the American Rottweiler Club was created to set a standard for Rottweiler breeders. The Rottweiler has also been recognized by the American Kennel Club and the United Kennel Club. Today, Rottweilers are a popular breed in the United States having been search-and-rescue dogs, guide dogs, and a favorite breed among many. Rottweiler Characteristics Appearance & Coat The Rottweiler is a large, broad, and muscular dog with a docked tail and floppy ears. Although many Rottweilers have their tails docked when they are puppies, this is mainly done for appearance reasons and dog competitions. This breed is recognizable by its notoriously sleek black coat with mahogany and tan accents. These mahogany and tan markings appear on a Rottweiler’s face, chest, legs, and paws, including 2 dots above its eyes that look like little eyebrows. Additionally, Rottweilers have a double coat that is medium-length and straight. As mentioned before, these dogs are quite large and can weigh between 80 to 135 pounds with a height of 22 to 27 inches at the shoulder. Temperament The Rottweiler can be given a bad reputation because of its guard dog history and intimidating appearance. However, this breed is actually very playful, good-natured, cuddly, and gentle. Rottweilers are thinking dogs that are observant and vigilant without being overly excitable. It should be noted, however, that this breed is territorial and highly devoted to its owners. Properly socialized Rottweilers are great pets for families with kids. That being said, this breed should be watched when spending time around groups of children where kids from its family are present due to this breed being very protective. Those interested in buying a Rottweiler should make sure to seek out reputable and legitimate breeders. This is important because bad breeding practices can negatively affect a Rottweiler’s temperament. Furthermore, getting to know the personalities of the puppy’s parents is a good step when picking out a Rottweiler to take home. Health Those interested in adding a Rottweiler to their home should be aware that this breed tends to be susceptible to many health conditions, another reason why getting a Rottweiler from a reputable breeder is so important. Make sure the breeder you buy your Rottweiler from has a health guarantee on their puppies and can provide documentation that the dogs used in breeding are healthy and free of any genetic conditions. On average, Rottweilers tend to live around 8 to 11 years. This breed needs to be watched for hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, osteochondrosis, cardiomyopathy, von Willebrand's disease, hypothyroidism, Addison’s disease, subaortic stenosis, overheating, cruciate ligament rupture, obesity, and various cancers. Additionally, Rottweilers can have conditions that affect their eyes such as progressive retinal atrophy, cataracts, and eyelid deformities. Obesity in large dogs can create joint problems so frequent exercise and not overfeeding your Rottweiler will help keep them healthy. Lastly, while many dogs can fall victim to bloating and gastric dilatation-volvulus, Rottweilers are at a higher risk. Owners of this breed should be knowledgeable about this condition as it can be fast-acting and lethal. Caring for a Rottweiler The Rottweiler’s Ideal Home Rottweilers are ideal for experienced dog owners since they require a lot of socialization. Additionally, this breed needs an owner who will be confident, consistent, and won’t give in during training. An ideal home for a Rottweiler is one with an adventurous, attentive, and active owner. These dogs can keep up with vigorous activity (as long as it isn’t too hot out for them) and enjoy activities like hiking, running, and swimming. People interested in owning a Rottweiler should be aware that these dogs, unfortunately, can get a bad reputation and should put in the work to be responsible owners. Likewise, finding a reputable breeder is very important for Rottweilers so potential owners need to be patient and take the time to fully research breeders before buying a puppy. Training Best Practices Training and socialization should be consistent with Rottweilers when they are puppies to combat overprotectiveness in the future. When bringing a new Rottweiler puppy home, it’s vital to get them into training right away to properly socialize and train them. During early socialization, owners should have their Rottweiler puppy spend time around other dogs, pets, strangers, friends, family members, and kids. Rottweilers are eager to learn and highly intelligent which makes training much easier. The best training method for Rottweilers is using positive reinforcement. Exercise Needs Because Rottweilers are working dogs, they need physical and mental enrichment to keep them happy and engaged. This breed hates being bored so mentally stimulating dog toys, puzzles, games, and training will keep them happy. If you don’t provide your Rottweiler with daily exercise and mental stimulation, they will find other ways to burn off energy which may include destroying things. In addition to mental enrichment, Rottweilers will need a couple of walks a day that are at least 10 minutes each. If Rottweilers don’t get the amount of exercise they need, they can become obese and face health problems. In total, this breed requires around 40 minutes of exercise a day. Grooming & Hygiene Grooming a Rottweiler is fairly easy as their coat doesn’t require tons of care and, since they are moderate shedders, can be brushed weekly. When the seasons change twice a year in the spring and fall, Rottweilers will shed heavily and blow out their coats. During this time, your Rottweiler will need to be brushed more often than what is usual. In contrast to their shedding, the Rottweiler is a big drooler. However, Rottweilers don’t need to be bathed often and can have baths on an as-needed basis. Lastly, owners should follow standard dog grooming practices such as cleaning ears, trimming nails, and brushing teeth.Although this breed can be misunderstood, Rottweiler owners continue to swear by their goofy, lovable, and good-natured personalities. Potential owners looking for a family dog that will also keep them safe should definitely consider a Rottweiler. Browse our current Rottweiler listings at Lancaster Puppies to find the perfect companion for your family.

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May 25, 2022

Hypoallergenic Dogs: 10 Breed Combinations that Reduce Allergies

People have been breeding dogs for centuries to create new breeds to solve existing problems and needs. Today, many mixed breeds were made to help reduce pet allergies so dog lovers can have no issues owning and spending time around dogs. Pet allergies in humans are frequently caused by a protein that is found in an animal’s urine, saliva, and sweat. This protein can stick to an animal's dead skin flakes, known as dander, and trigger allergic reactions in humans. When a pet sheds its fur, that protein and dander go with it and stay in the air and on surfaces. Thus, dogs that don’t shed a lot and have short, curly coats are best for owners who have allergies. The term hypoallergenic refers to dogs that are light shedders and produce low levels of dander. A hypoallergenic dog is one that has a lesser chance of causing an allergic reaction. While no dog can be totally hypoallergenic, there are breed combinations ideal for dog lovers with allergies. 1. Bichpoo (Bichon Frise & Toy/Miniature Poodle) Also called a Poochon or Bichon Poodle, the Bichpoo comes from a Bichon Frise and Toy or Miniature Poodle. This breed first appeared in the 1990s in Australia, created to be a family dog that doesn’t shed a lot. With its curly and soft fur, the Bichpoo is hypoallergenic just like both of its parent breeds. These are small dogs that weigh around 6-12 pounds and tend to be about 9 to 14 inches tall. As the parent breeds tend to be similar in appearance, Bichpoo puppies generally all have similar features and coats. With a lifespan of 12 to 15 years, these kid-friendly and affectionate pups make great family dogs. 2. Goldendoodle (Golden Retriever & Poodle) In 1969, the Goldendoodle was created after breeding a Golden Retriever and Poodle together. The purpose of the Goldendoodle, also called a Groodle, was to be a guide dog. These dogs have a lifespan of 10 to 15 years, generally weigh between 50 and 90 pounds, and are around 20 to 24 inches tall. It’s important to note that not all Goldendoodles are light shedders and hypoallergenic. People with allergies will want to choose a Goldendoodle that takes more after its Poodle side. This is because Poodles are hypoallergenic while Golden Retrievers are not. Hypoallergenic Goldendoodles can generally be identified by their coat, which will be wavy or curly. Additionally, Goldendoodle generations that end in B (Examples: F1B, F1BB, F2B, etc) will have more Poodle genes and thus be better for dog lovers with allergies. 3. Schnoodle (Schnauzer & Poodle) Introduced in the 1980s, the Schnoodle combines the qualities and appearances of the Schnauzer and Poodle. Used as a companion dog, this small-sized breed is usually 10 to 12 inches tall and tends to be around 10 to 20 pounds. These dogs also have a long lifespan, usually living for 10 to 17 years. The Schnoodle is a great choice for people with allergies since both parent breeds are hypoallergenic. These dogs have a dense and curly coat that makes them light shedders. 4. Morkie (Maltese & Yorkshire Terrier) Bred in the United States in the late 1990s, the Morkie comes from the Maltese and Yorkshire Terrier. Also called a Morkshire Terrier, Morkies generally live around 10 to 14 years. These are very tiny dogs, weighing around 7 to 13 pounds with a height of 4 to 8 inches. The Morkie is hypoallergenic as both the Maltese and Yorkshire Terrier breeds are hypoallergenic and low-shedders. 5. Cockapoo (Cocker Spaniel & Poodle) Also referred to as a Cockapoodle, the Cockapoo was first introduced in the 1960s when a Cocker Spaniel and Poodle were bred together. These dogs make great family pets as they have a lifespan of 12 to 15 years, are excellent with kids, and mesh well with other pets. Generally, you can find Cockapoos weighing around 6 to 19 pounds and standing 10 to 15 inches tall. The Poodle side of this mixed breed makes the Cockapoo shed and drool very little. These friendly and sweet dogs are easy to train, quick to adapt, and aren’t big barkers. 6. Cavachon (Cavalier King Charles Spaniel & Bichon Frise) The Cavachon, created to be a cute companion dog in 1996, comes from the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and Bichon Frise. This breed, also known as a Cavalier-Bichon or Bichon-King Charles, tends to live for 12 to 15 years. Cavachons tend to weigh between 15 and 35 pounds and stand around 13 inches tall. Cavachons have medium-length coats that shed very little. Additionally, these dogs are intelligent, happy, and get along well with people and animals. 7. Shorkie (Shih Tzu & Yorkshire Terrier) The Shorkie, bred from a Shih Tzu and Yorkshire Terrier, was created to be a smart and happy lapdog. This mixed breed’s high energy level keeps them active during their lifespan of 12 to 15 years. Shorkies do not have an undercoat and stand about 10 inches tall while weighing around 9 to 16 pounds. In addition to being light shedders and having low levels of dander, Shorkies make great family pets as they are good with kids, dogs, and cats. Fluffy and adorable, Shorkies are fantastic additions to families where pet allergies are present. 8. Mastidoodle (Mastiff & Standard Poodle) The Mastidoodle is less common but one of the largest doodle mixes. Bred from a Mastiff and Standard Poodle, the Mastidoodle only has 1 hypoallergenic parent breed. Like other mixed breeds with only 1 hypoallergenic parent, Mastidoodles that take more after their Poodle parent will shed less and cause fewer allergy problems. Similar to their hypoallergenic status, the Mastidoodle’s size will depend on which parent breed the puppy takes after. Generally, Mastidoodles are around 18 to 25 inches tall and fall in the 65 to 100 pounds range with a lifespan of 9 to 12 years. While energetic and athletic, the Mastidoodle is like a giant teddy bear and is comfortable around children and animals. 9. Yorkiepoo (Yorkshire Terrier & Toy/Miniature Poodle) The Yorkiepoo comes from the Yorkshire Terrier and Toy or Miniature Poodle, both being hypoallergenic breeds. Tiny but bursting with energy and playfulness, the Yorkiepoo is generally around 7 to 15 inches tall and falls into a weight range of 3 to 14 pounds. These dogs usually live around 10 to 15 years. Being a light shedder with minimal drooling and dander, these dogs are perfect for people with pet allergies. Additionally, Yorkiepoos are known to lack the “dog smell” that other breeds sometimes have. Despite their small stature, this mixed breed is independent, confident, intelligent, and athletic. 10. Maltipoo (Maltese & Toy/Miniature Poodle) The Maltipoo is unlikely to trigger allergic reactions as both its parent breeds, the Maltese and the Toy or Miniature Poodle, are hypoallergenic. Bred to be a companion dog for people with allergies, the Maltipoo continues to be a popular pet for allergy sufferers of all ages. The size of Maltipoos can vary depending on if their Poodle parent is a Toy or Miniature Poodle. However, they usually weigh between 5 and 20 pounds with a height of 8 to 14 inches. Additionally, these dogs live for 10 to 13 years, are playful with a moderate amount of energy, and are good with kids and other pets. Quick to train and cuddly, first-time owners with allergies should definitely consider a Maltipoo.   While all dogs are different and results can vary, these 10 mixed breeds are generally good choices for dog lovers with allergies. It’s important to remember that every person is not the same. A breed that works for one person may not work for another. Buyers can test if a dog will trigger their allergies by spending time around a certain dog or breed. For more puppy content, tips, and tricks check out our blog. Thinking of buying a puppy but unsure how to find a breed that fits your lifestyle? Take our quiz!

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May 02, 2022

Siberian Husky: The Sled Dog with a Big Personality

Siberian Huskies are adored and loved by many for their affectionate, social, and playful nature. Known for being very vocal and having a larger-than-life personality, these born-to-run sled dogs boast incredible energy, adaptability, and endurance. Read on to learn more about this famous breed that has been featured in books, movies, and TV shows for years. Siberian Husky Breed History The Siberian Husky we know today came from ancestors who were companions and sled dogs to the Chukchi people in Northeast Asia. These dogs were loyal members of the Chukchi families, frequently interacting and spending time with their children. The Chukchi people bred Siberian Huskies for their endurance and strength. These dogs would run heavy sleds over frozen ground and snow for miles, carrying both packages and travelers. Siberian Huskies were first introduced to the United States around 1908 for the purpose of running in a 1909 Alaskan sled race. In 1925, multiple mushers and their husky teams traveled over 650 miles from Seward to Nome, two towns in Alaska, to deliver the cure to a deadly disease outbreak. This feat, known as the Serum Run of 1925, led Huskies to be revered by many when their endurance saved numerous lives. Siberian Huskies were recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1930 and in 1938 the Siberian Husky Club of America was formed, continuing to certify reputable Husky breeders today. Siberian Husky Characteristics Appearance and Coat With an appearance similar to wolves, Siberian Huskies are notorious for their beautiful coats and markings. These dogs are medium-sized, weighing anywhere from 35 to 60 pounds, and are generally around 20 to 23 inches tall. This breed has ears that stand upright, a thick tail, and lots of dense hair. Their coats can come in multiple colors, including all black, all white, black with white markings, gray with white markings, and brown with white markings. Similarly, Siberian Huskies are known for their striking eyes which are generally blue or multi-colored. Huskies have a medium-length double coat that is straight, dense, and soft. Their thick coats give them the ability to withstand cold temperatures so having a Husky outside in hot weather is not ideal, comfortable, or healthy for them. Temperament The Siberian Husky is an extremely social creature with a fun personality. Affectionate with people and dogs, Huskies love making friends. Just like their ancestors in Northeast Asia, these dogs are great with kids and make an excellent addition to the family. However, potential owners should be aware that Siberian Huskies are prone to being stubborn and getting into mischief so firmness with them is needed. Owners looking for a guard dog will want to pass on the Siberian Husky as these dogs are so loving and social that they’ll want to befriend intruders instead of standing guard. Owners can satisfy this need for socialization by taking their Huskies to doggy daycare, dog parks, and playdates. Health Siberian Huskies are overall very healthy dogs and generally live around 12 to 15 years. Some health conditions Husky owners should be aware of include hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, and von Willebrand’s disease. Occasionally, Siberian Huskies can have problems with their eyes. These problems can include cataracts, corneal dystrophy, and progressive retinal atrophy. Bred to survive drastic conditions, Siberian Huskies don’t require a lot of calories or big meals every day. Because they need little amounts of food to survive, overfeeding this breed is easy to do. Reputable Siberian Husky breeders should have their dogs tested for genetic conditions and diseases. When looking to buy a Siberian Husky, be sure to ask about health clearances and problems. Breeders should have health certificates that state the stud and dam are free of disease and health conditions. Caring for a Siberian Husky Ideal Home Bursting with energy and a desire to explore, Siberian Huskies are escape artists. Because these dogs can be quick to escape, a home with a watchful and experienced owner is ideal. While they are not aggressive, Siberian Huskies do have a high prey drive and will want to chase smaller animals. Because of this, caution should be taken when having both a Husky and smaller pets like rabbits and cats in one house. In contrast, Siberian Huskies thrive in households where they live with other dogs since Huskies love being around other canines. Huskies don’t bark often, however, they are still very vocal and howl quite a lot. Their talkative nature makes apartment living less ideal for housing as apartment walls tend to be thin. Due to their social nature, Siberian Huskies hate being left alone. The ideal Husky owner is one who is home often or takes their pup with them everywhere they go.  Additionally, Siberian Huskies need an owner who is active like them and has the ability to give them consistent exercise. While having a yard isn’t needed, having a fenced-in area will be beneficial to Husky owners as these dogs love to run. Fences should be tall enough to prevent jumping over, as well as deep enough in the ground that a Husky cannot dig under it and escape. Training Best Practices Siberian Huskies are not a good choice for first-time dog owners. This breed is not suitable for everyone and works best with experienced owners who are confident and firm in their approach to training and interacting. Huskies aren’t quick to want to please their owners which can make training difficult. These dogs are pack animals used to having a leader. Owners need to take the role of the leader in order for their Siberian Husky to obey. Huskies like to test the limits so owners need to be able to remain confident and in charge. Exercise Needs Because they are working dogs, Siberian Huskies require lots of exercise and mental stimulation. These dogs should get at least 1 hour of rigorous exercise every day. This breed is a great workout companion for hikers, runners, walkers, and others who enjoy exercising outdoors. Huskies will take any opportunity to run, so keeping them on a leash every time they are walked is vital. If bored, Siberian Huskies may turn to destroying things and digging holes. Some owners of this breed have found that establishing a “dig spot” for their dog keeps their Husky from digging up the entire yard. Grooming and Hygiene This breed is a fairly moderate shedder. Owners who live in hotter climates will see more shedding from their Siberian Husky than those living in colder climates. This breed sheds its entire coat around 2 times a year. When this time of year comes around, they can shed heavily for three weeks straight. During the rest of the year when the Husky is not shedding its entire coat, frequent brushing isn’t necessary. Additionally, because their coats are shed every year, Siberian Huskies do not need to have their fur trimmed. Siberian Huskies keep themselves very clean and are not heavy droolers. In contrast to many other dog breeds, Siberian Huskies do not have that “dog smell” that many dog owners know all too well. Because this breed is so clean, they don’t need frequent bathing and, as mentioned before, brushing can be done infrequently on a weekly basis. As always, owners should follow standard grooming maintenance by clipping nails as needed (every 1-2 months) and brushing their dog’s teeth a minimum of 2 times a week. Siberian Huskies are sure to keep their owners entertained and active. Affectionate and sweet, this breed won’t stop loving on their family. Find yourself dreaming of owning this outgoing and energetic breed? Check out Lancaster Puppies’ Siberian Huskies for sale. Your new companionable furry friend could be just a click away!  

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Apr 28, 2022

How to Keep Your Dog Calm During Thunderstorms

Many dog owners know the signs. The sky begins to darken and along with it your dog starts pacing, panting, and whining. Fear of thunderstorms is very common among dogs, but this doesn’t make it any less distressing to pups and their owners. The fear of thunder in dogs comes down to their heightened senses. Dogs have incredible hearing and are sensitive to loud noises in general, having the ability to detect thunder before humans can hear it. Additionally, the changes storms create in air pressure and smell are also recognizable by dogs. Your pup will know a storm is coming before you do so it’s important to know how they express stress. Signs of stress in dogs can include behaviors such as panting, excessive licking, pacing, yawning, whining, hiding, increased salivation, and destroying things. It can be incredibly hard to watch your furry friend begin to stress at the first signs of a thunderstorm, so read on to learn more about how you can keep your dog calm during one. Know Your Dog's Safe Place Dogs usually have a safe place they go to when they are afraid, so having this space available to them during storms will help their anxiety. This safe spot is usually indoors, small, and closed in as these standards help them feel they are not exposed to danger. For example, some dogs like hiding in a bathroom, under a bed, in a closet, or in their crate. It’s important to note that you should never fully close or lock your dog into their safe space as they become greatly stressed at not having an escape. In their panic, they can start destroying things to get out and may end up injuring themselves badly. Have Toys & Comforting Objects Available While dogs naturally will find a secure spot for them to hide and feel safe, you can take steps to help them feel more at ease in this space. If your dog hides in their crate, you can put a blanket over the cage to further comfort them and add an additional sound barrier. Furthermore, adding things like your dog’s water bowl, bed, toys, a blanket, and music to this space can bring them more comfort and distraction. If you are able, don’t leave your dog alone and hang out with them in the room they’re in. Your dog will feel more secure with you there and you can keep them distracted by playing with them or giving them toys to keep them busy. Play Background Noise Having noise playing in the background can help distract and soothe your dog during a storm. Turning on the TV, playing music, having white noise on, and talking calmly to your dog are all ways you can help reduce their stress. There are even calming playlists created for dogs like Spotify’s pet playlist creator! Make sure the background noise you have on isn’t overly loud and excitable as this can have the opposite effect and make your dog more worked up. Pet Wrap Products Pet wrap products like ThunderShirt, Storm Defender, Anxiety Wrap, and Happy Hoodie can all provide comfort to a dog scared of storms. (Side note: The Happy Hoodie is even frequently used by groomers to keep dogs calm while blowdrying their coats!) Similar to swaddling a baby, these wraps soothe dogs through comforting pressure. Additionally, if you find yourself with an anxious dog and no pet wrap, you can DIY your own calming wrap! Pheromone Diffusers & CBD Oil Dog pheromone products like diffusers, plugins, sprays, and collars can be very beneficial in calming an anxious dog. These products work by recreating feelings of safety dogs received from their mothers as puppies. The various forms of pheromone products make it easy to find which method works best for you and your dog. That being said, make sure the product you pick up is for dogs as other animal pheromone products will be ineffective for them. Furthermore, THC-free CBD oil can also work fast to keep dogs calm and are widely available in oil and treat form. CBD is known to be safe for dogs, but checking with your dog’s veterinarian before administering something new is always a good idea, especially if your dog is already on medication. In addition to calming your dog, CBD oil has a history of being used by dog owners to reduce pain and seizures. Please note that while pheromone products and CBD oil are safe for dogs, essential oils are not. You should not diffuse or apply essential oils as these are very harmful to animals and can cause sickness and death. Work on Desensitization You can help your dog calmly endure future storms through desensitization. This can be done through a gradual process of playing storm sound effects. You want to help your dog raise their tolerance for thunder while still being patient and careful. You should not start out by playing loud thunder sounds but instead, depending on your dog’s anxiety level, can start out with rain sounds. After your dog becomes used to these sounds, move on to soft thunder and so on. It’s important to realize this is a gradual process and not something you can just put on loudly in the background. If your dog begins showing signs of fear from the thunder playing, you should turn it off right away. You can then go back to a quieter version of the sounds and continue working up to the next stage. Be patient and understand that desensitizing a dog to thunder and other loud noises can take months. Just like Rome, your dog’s desensitization will not be built in a day. While your dog’s thunderstorm anxiety may never truly disappear, you can help them reach a point where they are able to be calmer and less anxious. If your dog’s anxiety remains severe, seeking professional help from a veterinarian can aid you in determining if medication is right for your dog. Remember that fear is a natural feeling. Your pet should not be chastised or punished for the way they express fear. When you remain calm, it helps your dog remain calm. Overall, each dog is different so you may need to try out various calming techniques and products before finding the ones that work for you and your pup. For more information on caring for your four-legged friend, check out our blog.If you’re looking to add a new dog to your family (or just want to look at cute puppies), peruse our new arrivals!

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Apr 19, 2022

Mini Bernedoodles: The Best of Both Worlds

Since its first known breeding in 2003, the Mini Bernedoodle continues to rise in popularity. These dogs are intelligent, goofy, loving, and playful which makes them wonderful companions and additions to the family. Breed History Mini Bernedoodles are the best of both worlds, bred from the interesting combination of the Bernese Mountain Dog and Miniature Poodle. This breed always has a Bernese Mountain Dog mother and a Miniature Poodle father because of the size of the puppies. The Bernese Mountain Dog, also called a “Berner”, is originally from the Swiss Alps and was bred to be a working farm dog. The other parent breed, the Poodle, is an extremely intelligent dog that originated from Germany and was used for duck hunting. The Mini Bernedoodle was first bred in 2003 by Sherry Rupke, a dog breeder and the owner of SwissRidge Kennels. Rupke came to this match from a client’s suggestion, her mother suffering from pet allergies, and the short lifespan of Bernese Mountain Dogs causing grief for their owners. Mini Bernedoodle Characteristics Appearance and Coat Mini Bernedoodles come in many different sizes and usually have a height of 18-22 inches and a weight range of 15-45 pounds. Mini Bernedoodles are known to resemble the look of their Berner parent, a tri-color coat of black fur with white and brown markings. This breed can also be all black, all brown, black with white markings, and black with brown markings. Mini Bernedoodles typically don’t shed a lot and are a great match for owners looking for a low-shedding dog. They also have different coat types and can be wavy, curly, straight, or mixed. For those with allergies, a Mini Bernedoodle with a curly coat is the way to go, as they shed a lot less than those with straight coats. That being said, it usually takes about 5 or 6 months to be able to fully recognize this breed’s coat type. Temperament There aren’t many personality and temperament surprises with Mini Bernedoodles as both their parent breeds have temperaments that are alike. This breed loves being around people and following their owners wherever they go. They’re sweet, loyal, and very social with those they love. Despite being social dogs who are very affectionate with their owners, Mini Bernedoodles are prone to being shy around strangers. Desensitizing a Mini Bernedoodle puppy through positive social interactions can lead to a more confident and comfortable adult Mini Bernedoodle. These dogs are known to be great with children and perfect family dogs. This breed has higher energy levels while simultaneously having a calm temperament and the ability to be low-key after daily exercise. Health Mini Bernedoodles generally have good health and tend to live around 12 to 16 years. Because they’re part Miniature Poodle, the size of this breed means they are not as likely to have issues with elbow or hip dysplasia. Some Mini Bernedoodles inherit food sensitivities from their Berner side, however, this isn’t the case with all dogs of this breed. Both Bernese Mountain Dogs and Miniature Poodles were bred to have a coat that keeps them warm. As a result, Mini Bernedoodles can get hot easily and should be watched in hot weather to ensure that they don’t overheat. Even though this breed is at a lower risk of having health issues, it’s always important to check with the breeders about the health of the parent dogs. Caring for a Mini Bernedoodle This Breed's Ideal Home These dogs are social creatures and don’t enjoy extended time being alone so their ideal home would be one with a lifelong owner who can spend a lot of time with them. Mini Bernedoodles also require daily exercise, need mental stimulation, and don’t enjoy being bored. Their ideal owner is active, able to spend time with them, and is dedicated to their mental enrichment. Training Best Practices Mini Bernedoodles get their brains from their poodle genes and are very intelligent dogs. Because of their intelligence, these dogs are easy to train but can also be stubborn. One of the best ways to train a Mini Bernedoodle is with treats and food since these dogs are very reward-oriented. Staying consistent in training is essential with a Mini Bernedoodle as without it they can regress. While puppies are known for their spunk and lots of energy, Mini Bernedoodles are quicker than most breeds at leveling out their energy. This maturing usually takes place around 6 to 8 months for this breed. Exercise Needs This breed’s energy level depends on whether they take after their Berner or Poodle parent, but Mini Bernedoodles generally have higher amounts of energy. When compared with their larger Bernedoodle counterparts, Mini Bernedoodles are much more energetic. They get this energetic trait from their Miniature Poodle parent. Their energy means they need daily exercise and are usually good with 2 hours of activity every day. These dogs enjoy various exercise forms and intensities, making them a great workout partner and outdoor companions. Just keep in mind that Mini Bernedoodles get hot very easily and enjoy cooler temperatures. Grooming and Hygiene Frequent grooming is an important part of owning a Mini Bernedoodle. Consistent grooming will keep this breed’s coat healthy and clean so you’ll want to brush these dogs daily. Curly coated Mini Bernedoodles require more grooming attention to prevent matting. Outside of brushing daily, you’ll only want to bathe these dogs occasionally. Overbathing a Mini Bernedoodle can lead to dry skin. Looking to take home a Mini Bernedoodle? Find your new, loyal friend on LancasterPuppies!

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Mar 30, 2022

Top 5 Chill Dog Breeds

When making the decision to welcome a dog into your family it is important to research breed temperaments and select one that fits your family dynamic. Some families excel with energetic dog breeds that are always ready for an adventure, while others are looking for a calm and relaxed companion to lounge with them on the couch. Today we will be covering the latter, and going through our recommended list of the top 5 “chill” dog breeds across different sizes and appearances.  Cavalier King Charles Spaniel The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel can be traced back to the 17th century when they were favored by British royalty for their calm and gentle demeanor. Today, they are very popular as companions to the elderly and families living in apartments. They are very adaptable and responsive to their owner’s lifestyle. So, if you spend most of your time relaxing on the couch you will likely find your Cavalier right beside you.  Most Cavalier King Charles Spaniels have the following appearance attributes: Size: 12-13 inches tall, 13-18 lbs.  Coat: Silky and Medium-length Shedding: Moderate Basset Hound Basset Hounds are widely known for their easy-going temperament and soulful eyes. You’ve probably seen them in movies and television as a dog peacefully sleeping on the porch, or howling sweet nothings into the night sky. They get along well with children, and love spending time with their family. Basset Hounds do require a daily walk or playtime in the yard to avoid weight gain. However, once they have used up their energy they will typically lounge around for the rest of the day.  Most Basset Hounds have the following appearance attributes: Size: 13-15 inches tall, 40-60 lbs.  Coat: Short and Coarse Shedding: Moderate Lhasa Apso Lhasa Apsos are an ancient breed that dates back 1,000 years. They were bred by Buddhist monks in the Tibetan Himalayas to serve as guard dogs and companions. A calm, affectionate, and alert dog was very important in the Himalayas. Lhasa Apsos also sat on their owners' laps to keep them warm. They are about as “zen” as a dog can be and serve as a lowkey but alert guard dog for families worldwide. They develop strong bonds with their family, and with early socialization, they get along well with children.  Most Lhasa Apsos have the following appearance attributes: Size: 10-11 inches tall, 12-18 lbs.  Coat: Long, Straight, and Silky Shedding: Light Saint Bernard The St. Bernard is the largest breed on our list, but their calm and loving temperament has earned them the nickname, “The Gentle Giant.” They are a great choice for those with children, their patience with kids is legendary and has been showcased throughout popular culture. They love nothing more than spending time with their family, whether that be on a hiking adventure, or hanging out at home. Saint Bernards will need more space than the other dogs on this list, but they are sure to be loving and chill companions for life.  Most Saint Bernards have the following appearance attributes: Size: 25-27 inches tall, 120-200 lbs.  Coat: Medium Length, Dense Shedding: Heavy French Bulldog  The French Bulldog is one of the most popular small breeds and is especially liked by city dwellers looking for a calm apartment companion. They adapt easily to the lifestyle of their owners and don’t require much outdoor exercise. They thrive on human interaction and make gentle companions for children. These cute and cuddly pups are great for first-time dog owners and take to training very easily. As long as they receive enough love and attention, the French Bulldog is perfect for families of all shapes and sizes.  Most French Bulldogs have the following appearance attributes: Size: 10-13 inches tall, 24-30 lbs.  Coat: Short and Coarse Shedding: Moderate   Choosing your next breed of dog can be overwhelming. If you are looking for a calm pup that gets along with the whole family you can’t go wrong with the breeds on this recommended list. Are you ready to bring home your chill companion? Browse puppies of each of these breeds for sale on Lancaster Puppies today! 

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Mar 21, 2022

Lancaster Puppies Educates Buyers How to Identify and Avoid Puppy Mills

There’s nothing quite like the feeling of welcoming a new puppy to your home. Dogs are a big commitment and require a lot of love and care so, of course, you want to find a healthy pup that fits your lifestyle. Lancaster Puppies is an online resource that helps connect you with reputable breeders and healthy puppies throughout the United States.  If you are looking to add a new puppy to your family, we want to make sure you are fully equipped to make an informed decision. The breeders we aim to connect you with are responsible and caring with a passion for maintaining breed standards and preserving their quality of life. These are the kind of breeders you want to support. Unfortunately, there are sellers who do not have high standards when it comes to breeding. These sellers are not always easy to identify but if you know what to look for, you can be sure that you are not supporting a puppy mill. What is a Puppy Mill?  Puppy mills are defined as in-humane dog breeding facilities that produce for profit, while neglecting the needs of the puppies and mothers. Dogs raised in puppy mills are often sick and unsocialized because profits are prioritized over the health and well being of the animals. Their veterinary care is often neglected, and the mothers spend their lives living in confined, wire cages. Puppies are often kept in cages stacked on top of each other which can lead to parasites and other illnesses. While organizations like the Humane Society have worked extremely hard to make puppy mills less prominent, it is estimated that there are still 10,000 puppy mills in the United States.  How to Identify a Puppy Mill  Puppy Mills miss the mark when it comes to maintaining a high level of care and commitment to preserving breed standards. Puppies are often kept in small cages with wire floors that hurt dogs feet and legs, and cages are stacked on top of each other without enough air for the puppies.  They also will often practice forced breeding of female dogs, without enough time to recover between litters. We encourage everyone visiting our site to visit the breeder before you purchase your puppy to inspect their living conditions and visit with the mother of the litter. If you visit and are at all concerned about the conditions the puppies are being raised in, contact us immediately. We are committed to the fight against puppy mills, and ban any breeders on Lancaster Puppies that aren’t treating their dogs and puppies with the care and respect they deserve.  Hobby Breeders vs. Professional Breeders Puppy breeders generally fall into two categories, hobby and professional. These two groups often get into breeding for different reasons and are required to follow different regulations. Reputable breeders come from both groups but read on to learn the difference between them.  Hobby Breeders Hobby Breeders only breed occasionally, maybe once or twice a year, if that. Many hobby breeders are learning as they go and educating themselves on keeping the expecting mother healthy throughout the pregnancy. Hobby Breeders often aren’t breeding to make a profit, but for the love of the breed.  Hobby breeders sell most of their puppies in face-to-face interactions and are not subject to licensing. In 2020, the USDA updated the Animal Welfare Act, and anyone who maintains four breeding females and sells their puppies “sight unseen” would be subject to licensing.  Professional Breeders Professional Breeders are more knowledgeable, prepared, and have turned their passion into a business. Many professional breeders are experts about their favorite breeds, and are well equipped to keep their mothers and puppies healthy. They pay attention to things like pedigree analysis and keep detailed records of each parent dog and puppy throughout the breeding process.  They are required to follow a minimum of standards for ethical and humane care/treatment of animals set forth by the Animal Welfare Act (AWA). Special licensing through the USDA is also required. To find out if the professional breeder you are working with is licensed, click here.  When you are searching for your new puppy be sure to know your breeder and how they operate. We have put together some tips for finding a responsible breeder on our blog, we encourage you to read through this so you can make an educated decision as you are searching for your puppy.  The Lancaster Puppies Promise  At Lancaster Puppies we do everything we can to ensure that all of the puppies advertised on our site are bred in safe, loving environments. We require that every breeder listing on our site follow the state health guarantee laws and hold the required licenses. In 2008, Pennsylvania’s  Dog Law, Act 119 was passed to improve conditions for dogs in commercial kennels, and we do all that we can to ensure that every breeder on our site goes above and beyond the standards set in that law. We also provide information about health guarantees and what to do in the event that a puppies health isn’t ideal.  If a breeder on our website is suspected of being a puppy mill or violating state regulations we immediately investigate the issue and ban the breeder if the allegations prove true. We also work with local organizations to check in on suspected breeders, and provide information to ensure the health and safety of the puppies. If there are issues that aren’t remedied after this visit, we immediately remove the breeder from our site. Lancaster Puppies is not a puppy mill, and we do everything in our power to prevent unethical and unsafe breeders from advertising on our site. 

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Mar 08, 2022

Golden Retrievers: The Perfect Family Dogs

Since it originated, the Golden Retriever has been one of the most popular dogs in the United States. It’s hard not to love these friendly, happy-go-lucky pups! Keep reading to learn more about this lovable, loyal breed. Breed History The Golden Retriever was developed in Scotland during the 1800s, particularly by one man, Lord Tweedmouth, who was interested in breeding different types of dogs in order to perfect different breeds. Tweedmouth’s goal with the Golden was to create a superb waterfowl-hunting dog with a calm temperament. To do this, he crossed Tweed Water Spaniels with flat- and wavy-coated retrievers. The resulting breed immediately gained popularity thanks to its excellent hunting abilities, and it was given the name “Golden Retriever” in 1920.  The breed was recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1925. Since then, these dogs have established themselves as wonderful family companions and working dogs alike. Golden Retriever Characteristics Appearance and Coat These dogs have a body that can range from stocky and wide to lean and athletic. They typically weigh around 55 to 75 pounds and stand about 20 to 25 inches tall at the withers. The breed’s dense double coat is water-repellent and can vary in texture from wavy to straight. In terms of color, their coats can range from light golden or cream to dark gold. Temperament With its friendly demeanor and quintessential looks, the Golden Retriever is one of the most popular dogs in America. These outgoing pups will make friends with just about everybody they meet, from children and strangers to other dogs and pets. Hunters and families alike admire this breed for its trainability, sociable disposition, and great retrieving abilities. This breed, like many others, thrives on human connection and aims to please anyone around them. Health Goldens are a generally healthy breed, and most will live for about 10 to 12 years without any major health problems. However, like all breeds, they are prone to certain conditions such as hip and elbow dysplasia, cataracts, hypothyroidism, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), and allergies. Caring for a Golden Retriever This Breed’s Ideal Home Golden Retrievers were bred to be working dogs, so they have a lot of energy and need a lot of activity. They are best suited for owners who live an active lifestyle, and they thrive in a household where someone is around to spend time with them during the day. Since they form such strong bonds with their owners, these pups do not do well when left alone for long periods of time. They see themselves as part of the family, and they like to be treated as such! Training Best Practices These dogs are known for being obedient and easy to train, making them a good choice for first-time dog owners. Like with any breed, it's important to start training with a Golden as early as possible to establish a foundation for desired behaviors. This breed learns well through games, so be sure to keep training sessions fun and engaging, and don’t forget to offer plenty of rewards. When training a Golden Retriever, it's important to be clear and consistent. Incorporating a few short training sessions into your daily schedule will work wonders. Exercise Needs Golden Retrievers are high-energy dogs who need a lot of mental and physical stimulation on a daily basis. Without enough exercise, they might become hyperactive or boisterous. Running, walking, biking, and even swimming are all great forms of exercise for this breed. Ideally, they should receive at least an hour of activity every day. Grooming and Hygiene These pups are considered heavy shedders, and daily brushing is recommended to remove dead hair and prevent tangling. You should bathe your Golden Retriever as needed, or about once a month. These dogs should also have their nails trimmed once every few weeks. A good rule of thumb is if you can hear your dog’s nails clicking on the ground when they walk, they should be trimmed. Additionally, you should brush your dog's teeth on a weekly basis for good oral health and fresh breath. Want to add a Golden Retriever to your family? Find your new companion on Lancaster Puppies today!

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Feb 07, 2022

Get To Know the German Shepherd

The German Shepherd is a tremendously devoted and intelligent breed that has been long admired by dog owners around the world. If you’re - hoping to add one of these dogs to your family, read on to learn more about this beautiful, hardworking breed. History of the German Shepherd The German Shepherd originated in Germany during the 19th century, and it was developed primarily by one man: Captain Max von Stephanitz. Von Stephanitz’s mission was to create a superior herding dog. The end result was a success, they’re of high intellect, brave, and athletic - all necessary attributes in a herding dog. These dogs swiftly gained popularity in other nations, and the first German Shepherd is said to have arrived in the United States in 1906. The breed’s appeal declined during World War I, however, because it was associated with the enemy. Nevertheless, partially thanks to Rin Tin Tin, a renowned German Shepherd who starred in a series of films, the breed regained its popularity after the war. Today, the GSD ranks among the most popular dog breeds in America. German Shepherd Characteristics Appearance and Coat This breed is powerful and sturdy, typically weighing anywhere between 50 and 90 pounds. They are around 23 to 25 inches tall at the withers. The GSD’s coat consists of a medium-length outer coat and a dense undercoat and is usually black and tan or black and red in color. They have large ears that stand up straight, giving them an attentive appearance. Temperament German Shepherds are regarded as one of the smartest dog breeds. They are calm, loving, and fiercely protective of their home and family. That said, the breed makes an excellent family dog and friend, as well as a vigilant watchdog. These dogs are usually reserved towards strangers, although they are rarely hostile. GSDs may take some time to warm up to new people, but once they do, they are extremely loyal and devoted. The majority of these pups get along well with other animals, especially if they were raised with them. Health These dogs are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they are prone to certain health conditions. A few to be aware of are: Hip Dysplasia: Often seen in larger dog breeds, hip dysplasia is a skeletal condition in which the ball and socket of the hip joint do not fit together properly, causing them to rub together and deteriorate over time. Elbow Dysplasia: Similar to hip dysplasia, but the problem occurs in the elbows. Gastric Dilatation-Volvulus (GDV): Also known as bloat, GDV is a condition that occurs when a dog eats too quickly and then exercises vigorously after eating. This results in gas buildup and pressure in the dog’s stomach, making it difficult for them to breathe. GDV is a serious, life-threatening issue that requires immediate veterinary attention. Caring for a German Shepherd A German Shepherd’s Ideal Home German Shepherds make wonderful family dogs and working dogs alike. While these pups can adapt to a variety of different living environments, a home with a fenced-in yard is most suitable for their high energy and large size. However, if given ample daily activity, this breed can live happily in apartments. The ideal owner for a German Shepherd is an active individual or family looking for a companion to enjoy the outdoors. Additionally, GSDs do best in households where someone is home for a majority of the day. Training Best Practices The German Shepherd’s intelligence makes them highly trainable. With this breed, it’s very important to start training right away, especially due to their dominant nature. Above all, you must make sure to establish your status as “pack leader” as soon as possible. That way, your pup will know that you call the shots and that they should rely on you for guidance and commands. Exercise Needs These dogs enjoy being active and require at least an hour of daily physical activity. They love having a job to do, so be sure to keep them on their toes by giving them plenty of tasks throughout the day. Outdoors, these dogs should be kept on a leash at all times, as even the best-trained German Shepherds may become distracted by something they see and disobey orders. Grooming and Hygiene Nicknamed the “German Shedder,” this breed sheds heavily year-round, so you should anticipate brushing your GSD two or three times a week to keep shedding to a minimum. Additionally, Shepherds will require as-needed bathing. That said, if you are prone to dog allergies or don’t like dog fur on your furniture, this may not be the breed for you. You should also trim your GSD’s nails on a monthly basis, and be sure to practice good oral hygiene by brushing your dog’s teeth regularly. Is the German Shepherd the dog breed for you? Find the newest addition to your family on Lancaster Puppies today!

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Feb 03, 2022

Mini Labradoodles: The Perfect Family Companion

The Miniature Labradoodle is one of the most sought-after designer breeds due to its gentle disposition, manageable size, and adorable appearance. They are a cross between a Labrador Retriever and a Miniature or Toy Poodle. The standard-size Labradoodle is thought to be the first designer breed, and the miniature Labradoodle has all of the great qualities in a smaller package.  History of the Mini Labradoodle  The standard-size Labradoodle first appeared in Australia in the 1970s when breeders saw a need for a hypoallergenic therapy and service dog. Labrador Retrievers are considered the gold standard in the service dog world, and Poodles also have an agreeable temperament with a hypoallergenic coat. This combination created one of the most popular designer breeds in the world and got the ball rolling for the Mini Labradoodle to be created in 1988. To create the Mini Labradoodle breeders bred Labrador Retrievers with Cocker Spaniels, and bred that offspring with miniature or toy poodles.  Mini Labradoodle Characteristics Appearance and Coat Like most designer crossbreeds, the Mini Labradoodle can vary in size and appearance depending on the traits they pull from their parents. For example, if the Mini Labradoodle pulls more DNA from the Labrador you can expect their size to be larger, even when bred with a Toy Poodle. You can usually expect your full-grown Mini Labradoodle to be 14-24 inches tall, and 10-30 pounds.  The coat of the Mini Labradoodle can vary, but it usually falls somewhere in between the shorter double coat of the Labrador and the long and curly coat of the Poodle. This unique coat gives them an adorable “Teddy Bear” look and can be found in white, black, brown, and silver colorings.  Their ears are long and fluffy, sitting on the top of their heads and framing out their soulful and playful eyes.  Temperament Miniature Labradoodles are a great choice for any dog owner due to their intelligence, gentle nature, and happy-go-lucky personality. They are gentle and calm around children of all ages, which makes them a great option for growing families. They inherit their intelligence from both the Labrador and Poodle parents and take to training quite quickly. They love having other furry friends in the house to play with, so they do well in homes with other dogs. They are too kind and affectionate to be guard dogs, but they will bark if they feel their home is in danger.  Caring for a Mini Labradoodle A Mini Labradoodle’s Ideal Home Mini Labradoodles do well in homes of all shapes and sizes and can make great apartment dogs due to their small size. They get along great with children and other pets and love nothing more than snuggling and playing with their family.  Training a Mini Labradoodle Mini Labradoodles are quite bright and quite trainable due to the intelligence of the parent breeds, which is why they were originally bred to be service dogs. They are a great option for first-time dog owners who may get frustrated with a more stubborn breed. They love learning new tricks and commands to please and entertain their owners.  Exercise Needs They are a high-energy breed, but their small size makes it easier to meet their exercise needs. They love spending time with their family, so playtime and daily walks are a great way to get their energy out. They love swimming, so hikes with a creek or lake are an added bonus. Mental stimulation is also important and should be incorporated as often as possible in their exercise. This could take shape as providing puzzle toys to your dog that offer treats upon completion (solving) of the puzzle. Grooming & Hygiene Their curly coat should be brushed daily to prevent knots and mats from forming. If their coat is more poodle-leaning, regular trips to a groomer are also encouraged. Their grooming routine should be started early, and always be a positive experience to avoid negative associations with grooming.  Like all breeds, their nails should be clipped regularly to keep their paws clean and healthy.   Are you ready to bring home your own Miniature Labradoodle puppy? Browse Mini Labradoodle puppies on Lancaster Puppies today! 

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Jan 24, 2022

A Guide to the Australian Shepherd

Loyal, intelligent, and athletic, the Australian Shepherd is a breed like no other. If you are thinking about adding an Aussie to your family, keep reading! We’ve put together an informative guide on all things Australian Shepherd. History of the Australian Shepherd The Australian Shepherd dog breed did not originate in Australia, despite its name. Rather, it was developed in the United States by Basque shepherds who immigrated to the country after settling in Australia for a short period of time during the 1800s. The Australian Shepherd was (and continues to be) renowned for its abilities as a farm and ranch dog, herder, and tracker. However, it wasn’t until the 1950s that the breed became more popular in America, after appearing in films and rodeos.  The Australian Shepherd was first recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1993, and the breed is now well-known for its versatility and stellar herding abilities.  Australian Shepherd Characteristics Appearance and Coat Australian Shepherds are medium-sized dogs, typically standing around 18 to 23 inches tall at the withers. A healthy weight for the breed is about 40 to 65 pounds. An Aussie’s coat is coarse and medium-length. It varies in color but usually includes a mottled pattern with various shades of blue or red. Temperament Australian Shepherds are clever, even-tempered, and protective by nature. They have a strong desire to please and are easily trainable, but they require early and persistent instruction. These pups are excellent with children, but their protective instinct makes them apprehensive of strangers. Socializing is critical during puppyhood, otherwise, the breed may grow aloof as an adult.  Health The Australian Shepherd is generally a healthy dog, but like all breeds, they are prone to certain health conditions, such as hip dysplasia and epilepsy: Hip dysplasia: an irregular formation of the hip socket that can lead to painful arthritis and difficult mobility. Epilepsy: This breed can suffer from epilepsy, which causes them to have seizures on occasion. While not curable, epilepsy can be treated with medication. Caring for an Australian Shepherd An Aussie’s Ideal Home For an active owner, the Australian Shepherd is a delight. They form strong bonds with their families and get along well with children and other dogs. When given a job to do, this breed is quite adaptable, but if they do not receive enough physical and mental stimulation, Aussies can become hyperactive and destructive out of boredom. Unless they have frequent access to a location where they can run around, Australian Shepherds are not a great choice for apartment or city living. It is essential that they have a secure area to expend their energy at all hours of the day or night. Training an Australian Shepherd For this breed, proper training is essential. Australian Shepherds are smart and eager to learn, making them great students. These dogs will need help overcoming their territorial and overprotective tendencies and must learn how to channel their energy in productive ways. Because they love spending time with their owners, Aussies will view training as a bonding opportunity. Australian Shepherds typically respond best to positive reinforcement and reward-based training methods. With these dogs, it’s important to keep training sessions interesting, as too much repetition can cause them to lose interest. Exercise Needs Australian Shepherds are high-energy, athletic dogs who require daily exercise in order to thrive. They should have a spacious yard to run around in for a few hours every day, and they like going on walks and runs with their owners. They’ll also appreciate regular trips to the dog park. Aussies are at their best when they are given a task, whether it’s herding animals or participating in dog sports and agility competitions. Grooming and Hygiene Australian Shepherds have a waterproof double coat that has to be groomed on a regular basis. An Aussie’s coat should be brushed at least once a week to remove loose hair, with more frequent brushings during the spring and fall shedding seasons. Grooming an Australian Shepherd should also include regular nail trims and ear cleanings. Routine dental care is also a must for this breed. Is the Australian Shepherd the right breed for you? If so, find your new furry friend on Lancaster Puppies today!

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Jan 11, 2022

Tips for Selling Puppies Around the Holidays

There is some stigma surrounding people selling puppies during the holiday season, so what’s a breeder to do? Here are some helpful tips for selling your puppies during Christmastime. Tips for Selling Puppies Around Christmas If you decide to sell your puppies during the holiday season, there are a few things you can do to avoid a problematic situation and potential risks. Vet the Owners As a breeder, one of the most important things you should do when selling your puppies during the holidays is to vet the future owners. If someone is interested in buying one of your puppies, be sure to ask them questions that will help determine whether or not they are a good fit.  For example, you can ask the potential buyer what their holiday schedule looks like and how much it differs from their standard routine. If there’s a big contrast between the family’s regular and holiday schedules, it may not be a good idea to sell them your puppy. Some “green flags” to look out for when vetting the future owners are: They are retired or work from home, so someone is home most of the day They are existing dog owners and know how to handle a pup during the holiday season They do not have young children and/or don’t have hazardous Christmas decorations up By taking the time to properly vet interested buyers, you’ll be able to make the decision whether or not to sell your puppy with confidence. Educate the Owners If you’ve decided that a particular person or family is a good fit for your puppy, be sure to provide them with information and support for a smooth transition. Let the owners know that you have your puppy’s best interest in mind, and that you are happy to answer any questions they may have as time goes on and they adjust to their new furry friend. Provide a “Rain Check” To ensure that your puppies are going to their forever homes, another option is to give the future owners a “rain check” for the puppy of their choice. In other words, instead of giving them the puppy right away, you can provide the new owner with a picture of the puppy and have them pick up the puppy after the holiday excitement is over. Drawbacks to Selling Puppies at Christmas The biggest potential issue with puppies being given as Christmas gifts is that some people end up returning their puppies once the holiday season is over because they realize that they aren’t ready for the responsibility. In some unfortunate cases, these puppies are given to shelters after only a short period of time. As a breeder, you don’t want to be receiving calls from families who want to return the puppy they bought as a Christmas present. On top of that, there are a few other reasons why selling during the holiday season often requires extra work:   Seasonal hazards. Christmas decorations like ornaments, tinsel, and Christmas light wires, as well as certain holiday foods, can pose serious danger for puppies. Lack of structured routine. Many families’ schedules are hectic around the holidays and often don’t follow the same schedule as during the rest of the year. This could confuse puppies. Risk of separation anxiety. With time off work or school, people are generally home more during the holidays. Once things go back to normal, a new puppy could develop separation anxiety if they are used to people being home more often. These are all valid reasons why breeders may need to take extra steps while selling puppies around the holidays.  As a breeder striving to do what is best for your puppies, these tips will help you ensure that they are adopted by people who will provide them with a lifelong family and home. By following these tips, you can have peace of mind in knowing that your puppies will be in the best future homes. Remember, a dog is for life, not just for Christmas!

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Dec 20, 2021

Top 5 Cold Weather Tips for Dogs

Most pet owners are aware of the risks hot weather poses to their dogs. But many forget how dangerous cold weather can be for their furry friends.  Here are the top 5 cold weather tips for dogs.  1. Know the Limits of Your Dog No dog is the same and it is important to consider your pet’s limitations to understand its needs this winter. The first thing every new dog owner should do is research their breed. If your dog is a mix, include all known breeds in your research.  Understanding your breed’s origins will help with cold weather animal safety. If your breed is short-haired and originated in a warmer climate, then you will need to take extra steps to keep it warm during cold months.  It is also important to remember health because dogs with these ailments have more trouble regulating body temperature:  Diabetes Heart disease Kidney disease Hormonal imbalance  2. Check Their Paws Road salt, antifreeze and de-icers can irritate paws and are extremely poisonous to dogs. Do not allow your dogs to lick their paws after winter walks. Instead, keep a clean towel by the door to wipe their paws with after every walk.  It is also imperative for every new dog owner to check their puppy’s paws for damage in cold weather. Check for cracking, bleeding or burning from ice accumulation.  A major part of cold weather animal safety is being aware of your pet. Pay attention to anything out of the ordinary during the cold weather months.  3. Avoid the Ice Frozen lakes or even small streams can be extremely dangerous to dogs during the winter. It is impossible to tell how strong the ice is and it can be deadly if they fall through. It is best to avoid the ice at all costs with your dog.  Additional winter tip for your dog: Keep them leashed! Snow hides scent trails and more dogs become lost and disoriented in the winter than in any other season.  4. Provide Adequate Shelter From the Elements Pay attention to freeze warnings or inclement weather when creating your winter safety list for your dog. If they spend the night outside, even in milder climates, they need adequate shelter to shield them from the elements.  This shelter should be dry, draft-free, have plenty of room, and sit off the ground. The ground is colder than the air at night so your dog’s shelter needs to be off the ground by a few inches.  5. Prepare for Extreme Winter Weather Every new dog owner should be prepared for extreme winter weather that can cause power outages. Make sure you have enough food, water, and medication for your dog to last two weeks in case of an ice or snowstorm.  Have a plan for getting to the vet and keeping your dog properly exercised and entertained during power outages. It is also important to keep them warm!  Puppies and dogs make wonderful companions during the long winter months. Make sure they are properly cared for and kept safe this winter season with these 5 tips. If you’re looking for a new furry companion for the winter, find a puppy on Lancaster Puppies today!

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Dec 09, 2021

How to Choose the Right Dog Food

Choosing the right dog food for your new dog is an important decision and one that many people overlook. Many new dog owners assume that dogs are fine with any type or brand of dog food but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Choosing the right dog food plays a huge role in your new pup’s health and happiness, and in this blog post, we will help you choose which is best for your new dog. Meeting Your Dog’s Nutritional Needs This might seem obvious, but meeting your dog’s nutritional needs is the most important step in choosing the correct food for your dog. Most dog foods at least meet the minimum nutritional requirements for dogs, but not all dogs have the same needs. Dogs are a member of the Carnivora scientific group and have adapted to require meat and vegetables to meet their nutritional needs.  VCA Hospitals states that a well-balanced diet includes an appropriate amount of minerals, vitamins, amino acids, and fatty acids. These nutrients cannot be found in meat alone, so you should be feeding your dog a combination of meat, vegetables, and even carbohydrates.  Dog Food Digestibility When you are looking through the dog food aisle you will more than likely find similar ingredients and nutritional values on most brands. The difference between high-quality brands and discount options isn’t usually in the ingredients themselves but in their quality. There have been dog food digestibility trials that have shown foods with the same amount of protein, fat, and carbs vary widely in digestibility. Many dogs may have a hard time digesting the lower-quality ingredients, so the best practice is to purchase the highest-quality dog food you can afford to ensure your dog can digest it as best as possible.  Read the Labels One of the keys to identifying high-quality dog food is reading the label. The FDA has regulations that dog food manufacturers must follow, and information that they are required to provide on their labels. They have a helpful guide on their website that outlines their regulations and how to interpret them as you read dog food labels.  A tip that we find helpful is that products labeled as premium or gourmet aren’t required to contain any different or higher-quality ingredients. This just shows that you have to dig deep into the label to get the information you need to make an informed decision.  Know the Characteristics of Your Dog Once you have chosen a high-quality brand, you should assess the age, size, and dietary needs of your dogs to choose the specific dog food. We have outlined how these characteristics should inform your decision below  Age The nutritional needs of your dog will vary as they grow older, and the food you feed them should reflect that. Puppies are growing at a rapid rate so their calorie requirements are much larger than adult dogs. There are puppy-specific dog foods that are meant to meet the nutritional needs of a rapidly growing pup.  As dogs grow older you should monitor their weight and health and allow that to inform the dog food that you purchase. Some older dogs develop certain health conditions that require a specifically formulated diet, be sure to consult with your veterinarian as you choose the correct food for your dog.  Size The size of your breed should also be considered as you choose dog foods. For example, larger breeds typically require a higher calcium intake to promote healthy bone development. Small dogs that expend a lot of energy require more calorie-rich dog food.  Nutritional Needs Some breeds are more susceptible to certain conditions and require more nutrients as preventative care. Be sure to consult with your veterinarian about things your specific breed is at risk for so you can make sure your dog’s food is providing the correct nutrients.  With so many brands on the market choosing the right dog food can be intimidating. As long as you follow these steps and pay attention to your dog’s reaction to different foods your dog will be happy and healthy in its diet. An Excellent Source  www.KbbPetSupply.com

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Dec 01, 2021

All About the Cocker Spaniel

Sweet-natured, beautiful, and just the right size, the Cocker Spaniel makes an excellent companion for many different types of households and people. They’re a great choice for families and singles alike due to their loving and eager-to-please nature. Read on to discover more about this popular breed and determine if a Cocker Spaniel is the breed for you. History of the Cocker Spaniel The American Cocker Spaniel descended from the English Cocker Spaniel, both of which were used to hunt quail and other small birds. English Cocker Spaniels arrived in the United States in the late 1800s, but Americans favored a smaller version of the dog for hunting small game. As a result, the Cocker was gradually bred down in size over several generations, and the first “genuine” American Cocker Spaniel was born around 1880. In 1935, the American Kennel Club (AKC) formally divided the American and English Cocker Spaniels so that they were no longer considered the same breed. Following this split, the American Cocker’s popularity skyrocketed, and the breed is still beloved by many today. Cocker Spaniel Characteristics Appearance and Coat An average Cocker Spaniel size is about 13 to 15 inches tall at the withers. A healthy weight for the breed is around 15 to 30 pounds. These dogs are known for their floppy ears, big eyes, and wavy coats that can be a variety of colors including black, cream, white, red, and brown. Temperament The Cocker Spaniel is an easy-to-train, lively, and loving breed that is ideal for first-time dog owners. Cockers are very devoted and eager to please their owners, but they are a sensitive breed that responds best to positive reinforcement and reward-based training techniques. Cocker Spaniels that have been properly trained and socialized from the time they are puppies will typically have no trouble getting along with other dogs, children, and strangers. For the most part, these dogs are excited to meet just about anyone. Health Cocker Spaniels are generally healthy dogs and have an average lifespan of about 12 to 15 years. However, like all breeds, they are prone to certain health conditions that owners should be aware of. Two common conditions seen in Cocker Spaniels are chronic ear infections and hypothyroidism: Ear infections: A Cocker’s long, floppy ears tend to trap warm air inside the ear canals, which can promote the growth of bacteria and, in turn, ear infections. That said, it’s important to take special care of a Cocker Spaniel’s ears and clean them regularly. Hypothyroidism: When the thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough thyroid hormone, it can result in hypothyroidism. While common in dogs and highly treatable, this condition can be hard to spot because its signs are subtle. Cocker Spaniel owners should keep an eye out for symptoms of hypothyroidism such as weight gain, hair loss, and lethargy. Caring for a Cocker Spaniel A Cocker’s Ideal Home Cocker Spaniels are versatile dogs that can adapt to a wide variety of different living situations. However, it’s important to note that Cockers are naturally very people-oriented and like to be with their owners as much as possible. They are prone to separation anxiety and don’t do well when left alone for long periods of time, so Cocker Spaniels are best suited for households where someone is home for the majority of the day. Training a Cocker Spaniel Cocker Spaniels are known for being easy to train, and they usually respond well to reward-based training. Because Cockers are very food-driven, you can use treats as an incentive for them to drop things they shouldn’t be carrying. Treats can also help you control your dog’s desire to guard objects that aren’t meant to be toys. Exercise Requirements Cocker Spaniels were bred to be active hunting dogs, so they require a lot of exercise to burn off their high energy levels. Long walks and hikes are both excellent ways to get them the regular exercise they need because they like spending time outdoors with their owners. Additionally, many Cocker Spaniels enjoy dog sports like hunting, tracking, and agility, and competitive obedience. Grooming and Hygiene If not groomed frequently, Cocker Spaniel coats are prone to knots and matting. That said, it’s important to brush them on a regular basis to keep their coats healthy and minimize shedding. To keep their Cocker Spaniel’s coat looking its best, many owners use professional groomers. Additionally, be sure to take the time to check your Cocker’s nails and trim them if needed. As with any dog, dental care is an important part of a Cocker’s Spaniel's hygiene routine. You can perform dental care by brushing your dog’s teeth and offering dental treats or toys, but professional dental cleaning is recommended as needed. Ready to bring a Cocker Spaniel into your family? Find your newest furry friend on Lancaster Puppies today!

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Nov 09, 2021

Bernese Mountain Dogs: The Gentle Giants

Bernese Mountain Dogs are a large, beautiful breed with a sweet disposition. Originally bred to be farm dogs, they are now sought after as one of the most gentle companion dogs.  History of the Bernese Mountain Dog The Bernese Mountain Dog is one of four Swiss mountain dog breeds, along with the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog, the Appenzeller Mountain Dog, and the Entlebucher Mountain Dog. This area was essential in the dairy production necessary for Switzerland’s chocolate and cheese exports and features over 12,000 farms. Having a dog on the farm was a necessity to help with herding and guarding livestock, and Bernese Mountain Dogs were very popular in this region. They even served as drafting dogs with their muscular and sturdy build.  Today, Bernese Mountain Dogs are still used in a working capacity but are more commonly seen as family dogs due to their gentle and sweet nature.  Bernese Mountain Dog Characteristics Appearance and Coat Bernese Mountain Dogs are a large and sturdy breed. They stand approximately 23”-27.5” at the shoulder, and weigh 70-115 lbs. depending on their gender.  They are most known for their beautiful tri-color coat that features black, white, and brown colorings. Their chests, paws, and faces are accented by white, and their legs and faces feature brown colorings. Their coat is wavy, dense, and sheds year round. They have gentle brown eyes that are full of life and very expressive. Females tend to be slimmer, and males are wider and more masculine. They stand tall and proud, which combined with their beautiful coat gives them a regal appearance.  Temperament Bernese Mountain Dogs have one of the most desirable personalities in the dog world. They are intelligent, affectionate, and gentle. They are often included in lists of dog breeds that are best with children because of their gentle and playful nature. Their intelligence and calm nature make training a breeze, and they love learning tricks to please their owners. They can be hesitant around strangers, so early socialization with people is encouraged. They are protective of their families but do not get aggressive.  Health Bernese Mountain Dogs are typically a healthy breed but should be screened for things like hip dysplasia, blood disorders, and retinal atrophy. Some health issues that Bernese Mountain Dogs are susceptible to include: Canine Hip Dysplasia: Canine Hip Dysplasia occurs when the head of the femur bone isn’t connecting with the hip socket correctly. This is hereditary in Bernese Mountain Dogs, and they should be screened as puppies so they can be treated as soon as possible.  Progressive Retinal Atrophy: Progressive Retinal Atrophy is a hereditary condition that causes the retina to degenerate and can cause impaired vision and blindness. This can begin occurring as early as 3-4 months, but more commonly occurs around 3-5 years.  Von Willebrand’s Disease: Von Willebrand’s Disease is a hereditary blood clotting disorder that causes excessive bleeding even from the smallest cuts. There is no cure, but you can test your dog’s DNA to diagnose it. This diagnosis is especially important if your dog requires any type of surgery.  While the Bernese Mountain Dog is typically healthy, they have a lower lifespan of 7-10 years.  Caring for a Bernese Mountain Dog A Bernese Mountain Dog’s Ideal Home Because of their size and herding background, Bernese Mountain Dogs should live in a larger home with a fenced-in yard. They make great family dogs and are legendary for their ability to get along with children. They do not require as much physical activity as other large breeds but do best in an active household that enjoys walking and hiking.  Training a Bernese Mountain Dog Bernese Mountain Dogs are intelligent and calm which makes them very receptive to training. They are eager to please their owners, so positive reinforcement is a great tool during obedience training. Bernese Mountain Dogs love to show their affection, so training them not to jump up on people when they are puppies is encouraged.  Exercise Bernese Mountain Dogs should receive at least 30 minutes of exercise every day to remain happy and healthy. They love outdoor activities and make great companions for hikes and long walks. They love playtime with their owners and make great playmates for children.  Grooming and Hygiene Bernese Mountain Dogs have a longer outer coat and a woolly undercoat. They shed a fair amount year-round, and it increases during shedding season. Their coat should be brushed weekly to prevent matting and to keep them looking their best. Like all breeds, their nails should be clipped regularly.  Are you ready to bring home your Bernese Mountain Dog puppy? Browse puppies on Lancaster Puppies today!

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Oct 19, 2021

Top 10 Lap Dog Breeds

Looking for a dog that loves to curl up with you on the couch? You’ve come to the right place! Lancaster Puppies has put together a list of some ideal companions who love to lounge on your lap. Keep reading to learn more about some of the top lap dog breeds. 1. Havanese The Havanese is known for its devotion to its owners and friendly, people-oriented nature. It goes without saying that this little dog loves nothing more than to snuggle up with its people. Havanese are very fluffy and cozy, making them feel like a blanket on your lap! Additionally, this breed has a reputation for being intelligent and obedient, which makes training them a breeze. 2. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel The versatility of the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is second to none. These dogs will be by your side whether you want to lounge on the couch or take a walk in the park. Active, but gentle, Cavaliers are truly wonderful lap dogs. Plus, this breed is known to get along great with children and other animals. 3. Maltese You can tell right away that the Maltese was bred among royals by its long, elegant white fur. These dogs have served as sweet companions to people of all ages for centuries, and they’ve thrived in all sorts of environments. Intelligent and social, Maltese make wonderful family pets. They are an especially good choice for people who suffer from allergies, as they shed minimally. 4. Chihuahua Chihuahuas are often referred to as “lap potatoes” due to their fondness for cuddling up with loved ones. Keep in mind that these dogs tend to be loyal to one or two people and may not have much patience with small children. Additionally, a Chihuahua makes an excellent apartment dog because they can get most of their exercise indoors. 5. Pug With their loving personality and irresistible wrinkled face, there’s no doubt that a Pug will bring joy and happiness into your life. These tiny dogs have modest exercise requirements, so they’ll be content to nap in your lap as you watch TV or read the newspaper. Be aware, though, that these pups tend to snore! 6. Boston Terrier Boston Terriers are dedicated to their owners and are always ready to cuddle. They are fantastic lap dogs and beloved companions. These snuggly dogs make great family pets due to their small size and cheerful disposition. Easy to train and maintain, Boston Terriers can thrive in a variety of different environments and don’t require a ton of grooming or exercise. 7. Bichon Frise There’s a lot to love about these fluffy little dogs but it’s their lively, happy demeanor that really sets them apart from the crowd. What’s more? They like to snuggle, don’t shed much (making them good for allergy sufferers), and many Bichon Frise owners say they’re great with kids and other dogs. They’re also highly adaptable and do well in many different types of households. 8. Pekingese Another wonderful lap dog is the calm and loyal Pekingese. These adorable pups are quite small and love snuggling with their human companions. They’re also adaptable to most environments, intelligent, and easy to train, making them a good choice for first-time dog owners. Plus, they don’t require a great deal of exercise, so they can live well in apartments and smaller spaces. 9. Shih Tzu The Shih Tzu is another breed that was popular with royalty in the past, and it’s easy to understand why. They are intelligent and elegant canines who are known to be kind and fun-loving. Shih Tzus are sure to enjoy a good nap and they are especially appreciative of all the hugs and snuggle time they can get. They are also good with young children and other dogs. 10. French Bulldog Despite being larger than other lap dog breeds, the French Bulldog, or Frenchie, has a kind and loving temperament that makes it an excellent companion for just about anybody. This lovable breed doesn’t care if you live in an apartment or have a large yard. As long as you lavish them with love and playtime, they will undoubtedly reciprocate. Have you decided on the right lap dog breed for you? Start your search today on Lancaster Puppies, and browse hundreds of breeds from reputable breeders in your area!

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Oct 15, 2021

Dog Park Safety Tips

With a secure area to run and other dogs to play with, the dog park can easily become one of your dog’s favorite places to go. However, there are some safety tips to keep in mind before packing your pup in the car and heading to the local dog park. Read on for some helpful information on keeping your furry friend safe both before and at the dog park. Prepare Your Pup Your dog needs some preparation before you can simply take your leash and head out to the dog park. Most importantly, your pet's behavior with other dogs must be evaluated. For instance, during walks or visits to a neighbor’s house, has your dog displayed aggressive or defensive behavior toward other dogs? If so, professional assistance may be required to change unwanted behaviors prior to a park visit.  Choose the Right Park Before taking your pup to the dog, make sure that you choose one that’s a good fit for you and your dog. Look for dog parks with secure fencing and gated entrances, as well as posted guidelines for dog behavior. If you want to ensure your pup’s safety, select a park with designated spaces for large and small dogs. A separate area protects small dogs from larger ones, who may play too rough and cause injuries.  By taking the extra time to do some research and learn about the different dog parks in your area, you’ll be able to make sure that your dog has a good, safe experience. Vaccinate Your Dog Anywhere dogs gather, there's a possibility that infections will spread. A fecal screening is usually required at city-run dog parks to ensure that dogs aren't carrying parasites in their stool. In addition, all dogs must be vaccinated against contagious diseases, including: Rabies Bordetella Distemper Parvovirus Canine flu At the end of the day, keeping your dog up to date on vaccinations is all part of being a responsible pet owner! Basic Training and Commands Before taking your dog to the dog park, it’s important that he or she has received basic training and learned some simple commands, such as “stay” and “come.” While at the park, make sure your dog follows your directions and listens to you. When giving your pup a command, speak gently, yet strongly. Do not become angry or shout, as this may agitate other dogs nearby, causing them to act aggressively toward one another. Start With the Leash On When visiting the dog park for the first time, it’s a good idea to let your dog explore it while still on a leash. This will help to prevent your dog from ingesting a potentially harmful substance, such as left-behind food, toxic items, or foreign objects.  Consider going to the park during a quiet time of day, such as early in the morning or late at night. That way, you can walk around and enjoy the park without too much distraction. Understand a Dog’s Body Language While at the dog park, be sure to keep an eye on the dogs' body language, particularly basic dog etiquette like the “play bow.” When dogs meet for the first time, they use the play bow to indicate that they are friendly and want to play. Also be on the lookout for signs of aggression, such as Pulled back or flattened ears Snarling and snapping Several dogs picking on one dog (pack behavior) Crowding, corning, or charging other dogs Remember, the best thing to do when you predict a conflict or spot an aggressive dog is to pick up your dog and remove them from the area. Be Alert at All Times It may be tempting for you to mingle with other pet owners and simply let the dogs “do their thing,” but understanding all of the subtleties of canine behavior is critical to keeping your dog safe. You should be on the lookout for dog posturing, be conscious of your own dog's reactions to other animals, and keep an eye on interactions between your dog and others the entire time you are inside the dog park. Clean Up After Your Dog Hopefully, this goes without saying, it is expected of you as a dog owner to pick up after your pet at all times. You don't want your pup to roll around in dog poop, and you don't want to step in it either. You can either use the park's garbage bags or bring your own plastic bags. Now that you’re aware of the do’s and don’ts of dog park safety, it’s time to venture to the dog park! If you are looking for your newest furry friend, find your perfect puppy on Lancaster Puppies today!

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Sep 15, 2021

Introducing a Puppy to Your Older Dog: What to Expect

The decision to add a second furry friend to your family is exciting, and many families hope that this new friend will be an instant companion for their adult dog. While this is often true, it is important to know how to introduce a puppy to your adult dogs so they can be lifelong friends. At Lancaster Puppies, we are dog people so we will be pulling from our personal experiences and some proven techniques to offer you a guide to introducing a puppy to your dog.  How to Choose the Right Dog  There are a lot of things to consider when you are picking a puppy to add to your family. It is important to assess your family's needs and the characteristics of your existing dog so you pick a breed that doesn’t clash with your dog or children. We have provided some key characteristics that you should consider as you choose the breed of your next dog.  Size: If you have a small dog, introducing a large puppy to the family could cause injuries during playtime. Be sure to think about this dynamic as you are choosing your new puppy.  Temperament: Is your dog a couch potato? Calmer dogs may grow annoyed with more energetic breeds.  Sex: Many experts say that dogs of the opposite sex get along better. Dogs of the same sex can often compete with each other and get more jealous.  Living Space: How big is your yard? Can your home accommodate a larger breed, in addition to the one you already have?  Preparing Your Puppy for Your Home As with all new puppies, they should be examined by a veterinarian before entering your home and should be updated on their shots and vaccines. The core vaccines that you should be sure to update are below, but be sure to consult your veterinarian about what is best for your puppy. Adenovirus (Canine Hepatitis) Distemper Parvovirus Rabies We also recommend getting your new puppy spayed or neutered as soon as possible. This can help protect against serious health problems and can reduce many behavioral problems, especially during their interactions with other animals.  At Lancaster Puppies, all of our breeders have their puppies updated on their vaccinations and in most cases, come spayed or neutered. Also, many of our breeders have a health guarantee.   How to Introduce a Puppy to Your Dog Prepare Your Home The first step in introducing a puppy to your dog is preparing your home for a new puppy. We recommend putting away all of your current dog’s favorite toys and items to avoid territorial behavior as the dogs get to know each other. We also recommend purchasing your puppy his or her own bed, food dishes, and toys to avoid early confrontation.  If this is your first time bringing a puppy home, we have written up a guide for the first 48 hours with your puppy.  Start in a Neutral Location When introducing your dog to a puppy it is important to remember that your dog sees the house as his domain. Be sure to know both dog’s breeds and whether they have a tendency to be territorial with their home and family. It is for this reason that we recommend introducing your dogs in a neutral location to avoid protective behavior. This could be a local park, a friend’s fenced-in yard, or any other low-traffic location with no other dogs present.  The First Introduction We recommend keeping both dogs on a leash during the first introduction. This allows them the freedom to move and meet one another and gives you the ability to intervene if aggressive behavior begins. Many owners have a tendency to hold the puppy and the older dog as they are introducing; don’t do this! This can make your older dog anxious and cause the introduction to go south.  Bringing Your Puppy Home When you finally bring your new furry family member home we suggest keeping both dogs on their leashes again. Even though they have already been introduced, this is the first time your adult dog is interacting with the puppy on their turf. For the first few interactions, we recommend keeping them short, and always under your supervision. You don’t know how your older dog is going to react, and you will be there if aggressive behavior develops.  Puppies aren’t the best at reading other dogs’ body language, so you may have to separate them if the puppy is trying to play and your older dog is obviously not into it. Below are some things you should be looking out for that could mean your dog is getting aggressive.  Raised fur on the neck Exposed teeth Aggressive growling Prickled ears If possible, have a home base (separate rooms, for example) for each dog so that if playtime gets too rowdy or your adult dog is getting frustrated each dog has a safe place to return to. Getting a new puppy is exciting, and if you follow these steps can create a lifelong friend for your adult dog. Don’t get frustrated, work on training your puppy, and watch the friendship blossom! Our blog is filled with other helpful tips for dog owners that might help you in your new puppy journey, and give you some insight into which breed is best for you. When you are ready to look for your new puppy, find your furry friend on Lancaster Puppies today!

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Sep 14, 2021

Is a Dalmatian the Right Breed for You?

The Dalmatian is one of the most easily recognized dogs in the world, thanks to its spotted coat. These loyal dogs thrive on human companionship and make great family pets, but they aren’t suited for all households. Read on to learn more about this beautiful breed. History of the Dalmatian While many purebred dogs have a storied history, the Dalmatian’s ancestry is largely a mystery. Although it was named after Dalmatia, a region in modern-day Croatia, there’s a good chance that the Dalmatian did not come from there.  Dalmatians have been used for a wide range of tasks over the years, from herding to retrieving. The breed was particularly popular in England as a coaching dog, clearing paths before horses, running beside the coach, and even guarding the horses and coach when not in use. Indeed, Dalmatians have a particular fondness for horses. In the United States, the Dalmatian was primarily utilized as a firefighter’s dog. Today, Dalmatians are mostly found in homes as family pets and companions. Dalmatian Characteristics Appearance and Coat Dalmatians are medium-sized dogs that typically stand around 22 to 24 inches tall at the withers and weigh about 40 to 60 pounds. These pups have a sleek, athletic frame with a long tail that curves upwards. The Dalmatian’s infamous spotted coat is short and dense and features black or brown spots on white fur. Temperament Active, lively, and loving, Dalmatians thrive on companionship. People, especially family members, make this breed happiest. Involvement in family activities is very important to Dalmatians, who do not tolerate being left alone for long periods of time. They may become destructive or develop separation anxiety if they aren’t exposed to a lot of human interaction. Quiet and cautious, a Dalmatian is typically reserved around strangers. These dogs usually get along with other dogs and pets, but it’s preferable that they are raised with them. Like all dogs, Dalmatians should be socialized during puppyhood to prevent unwanted or troublesome behaviors. Health The Dalmatian is generally a healthy dog, but like all breeds, it’s prone to certain health conditions. Hereditary deafness and urolithiasis are two of the most common: Deafness: Hereditary deafness is a trait that all Dalmatian bloodlines are capable of passing along to their offspring. Approximately 8 percent of all Dalmatians are born completely deaf, and about 22 to 24 percent are born with hearing in only one ear. All Dalmatians should receive a BAER (Brainstem Auditory Evoked Response) test to make sure they can hear. It’s important to note that reputable breeders will only breed Dalmatians with hearing in both ears. Urolithiasis: Dalmatians have a unique urinary tract system, as their urine contains uric acid instead of urea or allantoin. This makes them susceptible to the formation of urinary tract stones, or Urolithiasis. These stones can cause blockages in the urinary tract, so be sure to keep an eye out for your Dalmatian's regular urination, and make sure they have plenty of fresh water available at all times. Caring for a Dalmatian A Dalmatian’s Ideal Home Due to their people-oriented nature, Dalmatians are best suited for households in which someone is home for the majority of the day. Generally speaking, the maximum amount of time that a Dalmatian should be left alone is four hours. In addition, it’s important to note that these dogs should live in an active household. This breed requires a ton of daily exercise, so it’s essential that anyone considering a Dalmatian is certain they can keep up with its high activity requirements. While Dalmatians are capable of living in an apartment if their exercise needs are met, it is recommended that they live in a home with a yard for them to run around in safely. Training a Dalmatian While intelligent and quick to learn, Dalmatians can also be stubborn and need continuous training. These pups tend to be quite sensitive, so they will usually respond best to positive reinforcement and reward-based training. Additionally, in order to ensure that your Dalmatian gets the right training, everyone in your family should be on board and involved. Your dog will likely develop a stronger bond with family members as a result. Exercise Dalmatians are high-energy dogs who love to exercise. Bred to run for miles, these dogs require daily rigorous activity in order for them to be well-behaved at home. At a minimum, a Dalmatian’s exercise needs can be met by walking or jogging for an hour every day. In addition, be sure to provide your Dalmatian with plenty of time to run freely in a secure area. Grooming and Hygiene One benefit of the Dalmatian’s short, fine fur is that it’s easy to maintain. Simply remove dead hair from the coat by brushing it a few times per week with a bristle brush, hound mitt, or pumice stone. However, many Dalmatian owners report that this breed’s coat sheds around the clock. That said if you choose to add a Dalmatian to your family, be prepared to deal with lots of dog fur. The rest of Dalmatian maintenance is relatively simple. Every few weeks, or as needed, trim your Dalmatian’s nails. To prevent bacterial or yeast infections from developing, keep your dog’s ears clean and dry. Additionally, routine teeth brushing is essential for optimum oral health and breath freshness. Have you decided on a Dalmatian for your next companion? Find your new furry friend on Lancaster Puppies today!

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Sep 10, 2021

Unique Poodle-Mix Breeds: Combinations You May Not Know

One of the reasons poodles are used to breed hybrids now more than ever is because of the shift in what we call the puppies resulting from these unions. Today, these offspring are known as “mixes”, not “mutts”!  Due to this, people have grown more aware of the benefits that result from crossing Poodles with other popular breeds. To name a few, high intelligence, hypoallergenic coats, and a healthy disposition are included among these.  Read on to learn more about interesting hybrids, as well as the benefits you will enjoy from the Poodle combination! Stand Out With Rare Poodle Mix Puppies If you’re the kind of dog owner who will enjoy people taking notice of your poodle mix breed during morning or evening strolls, you’ll want to pay attention to the following poodle mix combinations.  You’ll also want to avoid choosing Labradoodles, Goldendoodles, Cavapoos, and Maltipoos. These tend to be a few of the more popular choices that have grown in popularity over recent years.    5 Lesser-Known Poodle Cross Breeds:  Aussiepoo: Choose from beautiful color combinations made famous by the Australian Shepard’s long, wavy coat. Options range from mottled blue and white, to tan and brown. Don’t be surprised if this hybrid attempts to herd your family members! Corgipoo: A small stature and peppy personality make the Corgi a perfect crossbreeding option! You can expect your Corgipoo to reach between 12 to 40 pounds as an adult.   Schnoodle: Already a popular family pet, the Miniature Schnauzer possesses a strong loyalty to family. A companion dog, you can be sure you’ll lap will never be empty again. Boxerdoodle: Perfect for the big dog lover who enjoys a more subdued buddy than a purebred Boxer. One downside you should prepare for is that this is one of the higher-end (aka more expensive) hybrid poodle mixes available.   Doxiepoo: All of the benefits of the playful, calm nature of the Poodle with the guard dog qualities of the Doxen. This breed typically interacts well with children and adults, with an ability to treat both with gentleness and tolerance.    At Lancaster Puppies, you can find the perfect match regardless of the unique poodle mix breed you are looking for! Browse animals by location, breeder, or type.  You can also download our convenient app, which lets you view available puppies and stay up to date with the latest additions.  Poodle-Mix Spotlight: Whoodle An Active, Friendly Companion Even those who are familiar with extensive dog breeds may have trouble identifying the partner to this combination!  Also known as the Wheatendoodle, these hybrids are famous for their soft, curly coats and timid demeanors. They maintain the size of their Wheaten Terrier roots over time.   Easy to Train, Perfect for Families Although high energy is certainly an adjective that applies to the Whoodle, their intelligence makes them capable of training with medium effort.  Taking about an hour or so a day for exercise should help to curb unwanted behavior.  Poodle-Mix Spotlight: Bordoodle  The Dog Who Has Never Met a Stranger Perfect for any member of the family, Bordoodles are ideal companions for those ranging from childhood through senior adulthood. These dogs show great loyalty to those close to them but are rarely if ever aggressive.  A Great Option For Those Who Work Away From Home As many people discovered while spending more time working from home, it’s important to match your ability to spend time with your future dog with how much you need to be away for work or other commitments.  The Bordoodle is a great option for those who spend some time away during the day, which is not the case for all breeds! Intelligent and capable, the Bordoodle will do well as long as they are provided with ample toys, entertainment, and bedding. Get Matched With the Perfect Mixed Poodle Puppies! Now that you understand a few of the more and less common combinations of Poodle breeds, the hard part of the new puppy adoption process begins. You have to decide which is the right fit for you. Luckily, you can choose from more than 10,000 puppies and dogs who are waiting to be chosen. AKC, ACA, ICA, CKC, and APRI registered pets are available.  You can rest assured that Lancaster Puppies is dedicated to stopping puppy mills, with our website existing to connect caring families with healthy puppies. Discover your new best friend today. Don’t wait: your new puppy (AKA best friend) is only a click away! 

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Aug 19, 2021

What Is a Shiba Inu? Everything You Need to Know

Whether you are aware or not, the Shiba Inu is one popular breed that you likely pass by on the block more often than you realize! This peppy, alert little dog should not be underestimated when it comes to being attentive to their owner. With a life expectancy upwards of 15 years, this is one companion you can plan to rely on for years to come. Read on to learn more about this happy breed.  All About the Shiba Inu History of the Shiba Inu Brought to this country a little more than 50 years ago, the Shiba Inu has been the most popular breed in Japan for its adaptability and good-spirited nature. Dating back to ancient times, this breed also fares well whether they are located in the city or countryside. As a result, the Shiba Inu is quickly gaining popularity in countries such as the USA.   Relatively new to gain acceptance by the American Kennel Club (AKC), the Shiba Inu was recognized officially in 1992. The breed is considered by the AKC to maintain a medium range of breed popularity ranking.  Appearance and Coat Considered a small to medium breed, the Shiba Inu can be expected to reach an overall height of 14.5”-16.5” for males and about an inch shorter for females on average. Males will reach a final adult weight closer to 25 pounds, whereas females can be expected to reach maturity between 17-18 pounds or so. Another one of the pros of the breed is its beautiful coat, which features a double layer that is neither wiry nor curly. The smooth, soft coat is considered medium level when it comes to shedding, with regular monthly grooming typically sufficing for care.  A variety of colors and markings are typical of the Shiba Inu, with Black and Tan, Cream, Red Sesame, and Red colors recognized by the AKC. In addition, standard white markings designate key highlights around the dog’s chest, face, and paws.  Temperament The Shiba Inu ranks in the middle in terms of being welcoming to people they are not familiar with. An alert and patient breed, this can be considered a lookout dog of sorts! You can expect your Shiba Inu to be playful in the medium range as well, with frequent but short play or walk sessions to be expected. Those on the go or who live active lifestyles will also be glad to learn that this is one dog that can learn to roll with the punches, so to speak, with respect to adapting routines. With socialization and training, this spirited and devoted breed can be great for families with children. Health All breeds have certain susceptibility to health conditions and impairments in later years, and the Shiba Inu is no exception. This being said, you should be sure to monitor your Shiba Inu for patella, hip, and ophthalmological issues through your veterinarian’s office.  Patellar Luxation: You may need to consult your veterinarian about this issue in the event you notice your Shiba Inu “skipping a step” or otherwise attempting to walk on three legs while in motion. This may indicate that the knee has become dislocated, which requires quick medical attention.  Hip Dysplasia: Similarly, being keen on your dog’s normal behavior can also help you notice a decreased range of motion in the hip area. This combined with a loss of thigh muscle mass or grating in the joint while your dog walks can indicate hip dysplasia.   Cataracts: This inherited disease does tend to appear more frequently in Shiba Inus. Cataracts occur when the lens in the back of the eye loses its ability to focus light. As a result, a cloudy or opaque lens becomes apparent over the eyes.  Be sure to develop a regular health care plan for your Shiba Inu with your trusted veterinarian to be sure you can reach the maximum lifespan of your pet. In this case, you can expect to enjoy more than 15 years with your dog with regular care.  A Shiba Inu’s Ideal Home The same adaptability to country or inner city living that made this breed popular in Japan has jettisoned the Shiba Inu’s demand in the US. In addition to its colorful coat, peppy attitude, and attentive nature, this breed enjoys stability for the most part with a willingness to engage on the occasional outdoor or far-away adventure.  Training a Shiba Inu The intelligence of the Shiba Inu combined with its assertiveness makes for a bit of a challenge when it comes down to training. With regular dedication and practice, however, this breed can be swayed to follow suit. This is especially true when you are able to convince the Shiba Inu it wanted to comply with your request all along! Exercise Perfect for a big backyard in the countryside, or a cramped living quarters in the downtown section, you can expect your Shiba Inu to require an average amount of daily exercise. You should plan to provide plenty of activities and fun spaces for your dog, though, when you plan to be away for several hours at a time. This can help prevent unwanted barking, chewing, or otherwise naughty behavior in your absence.  Grooming and Hygiene Although their coat is not wiry or rough in feel, you should expect to brush your Shiba Inu regularly to prevent its double coat from matting or becoming unruly with shedding.  Be sure to keep their nails in proper length and form, and check teeth regularly for any signs of decay or foul-smelling breath. The latter can indicate an infection or abscess and should be addressed quickly by a veterinarian. What do you think, is a Shiba Inu the perfect match for your city or country home? Consult one of the breeders from Lancaster Puppies to be matched with the pup of your dreams. 

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Aug 18, 2021

Boston Terrier Breed Info: Temperament, Appearance, and More

Boston Terriers are one of the most popular breeds in the United States due to their friendly disposition and adaptability. This compact breed is low maintenance and a great dog for any family.  History of the Boston Terrier The first Boston Terrier was bred in Liverpool in the 1860s when a Bulldog was bred with the now-extinct White English Terrier. This dog was sold to William O’Brien, who traveled home to Boston with this new breed. O’Brien bred this dog with a small white female Terrier and continued to breed them with smaller dogs to get the traditional Boston Terrier look today. Despite their name, the Boston Terrier is not actually a Terrier but is categorized as a Non-Sporting Dog.  Boston Terriers are now a point of hometown pride. They have been the official mascot of Boston University for over 100 years, and were named the official dog of Massachusetts in 1979.  Boston Terrier Characteristics Appearance and Coat Boston Terriers are a small and sturdy breed. Boston Terrier size falls into three categories: under 15 pounds, 15 to 20 pounds, and 20 to 25 pounds. They stand approximately 17 inches at their withers or the area above their shoulder.  They have broad chests, and their heads are square and flat on top. They have a defining short muzzle that is also square and broad. Their ears are small, erect, and are often compared to bat ears. Their coat is short and smooth, and either brindle with white markings or black with white markings. Boston Terriers do shed their coat, but it can be easily managed with regular brushings. Their colorings can make it look like they are wearing a tuxedo, which has earned them the nickname, “The American Gentleman.”  Temperament Boston Terriers are cheerful and happy-go-lucky and make gentle companions. They are easily trained and are eager to learn new tricks to please their owners. They have a tendency to be stubborn, so Boston Terrier puppies should be trained early. They are great with other pets, and because they are sturdier than most terriers they are very patient with small children. They are very protective of their family and can be aggressive to new pets and strangers. They tend to be quiet and only bark only when necessary.  Health Boston Terriers’ are typically a healthy breed, but should be screened for certain issues, especially when it comes to their prominent eyes. Some health issues that Boston Terriers are susceptible to include: Corneal Ulcers: Corneal Ulcers occur when layers of a dog’s eye erode through the layers of the eye and into the cornea. Fluid accumulates in the protective layer of the cornea, giving a cloudy appearance to the eye. They occur most commonly from some sort of trauma, like a scratch or contact with a sharp object.  Roaching: Roaching is a curvature of the back that can be caused by kneecap problems with Boston Terrier’s rear legs. This curvature can cause the dog to lean forward onto its forelegs. Boston Terrier’s patellas should be screened regularly to prevent this from happening.  Difficulty Breathing: Like most flat-faced dog breeds, Boston Terriers can have difficulty breathing and are prone to snoring. They can also be susceptible to reverse sneezing, which is a rapid and forced inhalation through the nose that can cause snorting or gagging to clear the palate of mucus.  Just like all dog breeds, you should take your Boston Terrier to the vet for regular checkups and shot updates. The average Boston Terrier's lifespan is 10 to 14 years.  Caring for a Boston Terrier A Boston Terrier’s Ideal Home Boston Terriers are very adaptable and do well in homes from large farms to apartments. Their compact size and low tendency to bark make them great options for city dwellers, and they do well when left alone while their owners are at work.  They do well with all family sizes and make great companions for children. If you have other pets you should socialize your Boston Terrier with them early so their protective instincts don’t take over.  Training a Boston Terrier Boston Terriers are intelligent and eager to please, which makes them very trainable. They do have a tendency to be stubborn, so training should be started ASAP. They do very well with rewards-based training because it shows that they are pleasing their owner, and being rewarded accordingly.  Exercise Boston Terriers are energetic and love exercising and playing with their owners. Simply letting them out into the yard isn’t enough for a Boston Terrier. Brisk walks one to two times a day and engaging them with toys regularly is usually enough to get their energy out. If they are left alone for long periods of time they may develop undesirable behaviors. Grooming and Hygiene  A Boston Terrier’s fine coat sheds, but not as much as most breeds. Brushing their coat weekly removes loose hair and promotes a healthy coat. They are a clean breed and only need to be bathed occasionally unless they get into something messy. As with all breeds, their nails should be trimmed regularly to avoid problems walking and running.  Are you ready to bring home a Boston Terrier puppy? Browse Lancaster Puppies to choose your new furry friend today!

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Aug 17, 2021

Best Dog Breeds for First-Time Owners

Getting a dog for the first time is exciting, to say the least. While it’s normal to be eager to bring your new dog home, it’s important to take the time to educate yourself on different breeds and not rush into buying a dog. There are some breeds that are better for first-time dog owners than others. Read on for some helpful first-time dog owner tips and an overview of the top dog breeds for beginner owners. What Should I Look For in My First Dog? When deciding on a dog breed, there are certain traits that first-time owners should be on the lookout for. One of the most important is trainability. If you’re getting a dog for the first time, it’s a good idea to find a breed that’s obedient and easy to train. While many breeds can be trained fairly easily, there are some dogs that require more experienced and patient owners. Aside from trainability, the other traits you should look for in your first dog are traits that align with your personality and lifestyle. For example, if you are an active individual and exercise frequently, you may lean toward an athletic or high-energy breed that’s able to keep up with your level of activity. On the other hand, if you’re looking for a lap dog, consider a breed with a lower energy level. Additionally, think about the amount of attention that you’ll be able to give your new dog. For instance, if you work full-time and are out of the house during the day, it’s best to avoid breeds that are prone to separation anxiety. Top Breeds for Beginner Dog Owners Poodle Whether it’s a toy, miniature, or standard size, the Poodle is certainly one of the best breeds for first-time owners. These loving and loyal dogs are said to be one of the smartest dog breeds, which also makes them one of the easiest dogs to train. Poodles love to learn and are eager to please, and they love being given a job to do. Given their adaptable nature, Poodles can do very well in a variety of households, including those with children and other pets. Yorkshire Terrier For anyone in search of a lap dog, look no further than the Yorkshire Terrier! These little dogs are very affectionate and love nothing more than spending time with their owners. Yorkies are smart dogs that learn quickly and are easy to train, making them great “starter dogs.” Keep in mind, though, that Yorkshire Terriers have a coat that grows continuously and needs regular brushing and trimming, so be sure that you are prepared to handle this pup’s grooming needs! Despite their long coats, Yorkies are considered a hypoallergenic breed due to their low shedding level. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is known for its even temper and affectionate personality. They are very adaptable to their owner’s lifestyle, which is part of the reason they’re such a great choice for first-time dog owners. Cavaliers can thrive in all kinds of different households and get along well with just about anyone, from strangers to children. These pups aren’t overly energetic, so they’re also a good pick for apartment dwellers. French Bulldog The French Bulldog’s loving, easygoing personality is one of the most appealing features for many owners. Frenchies are very adaptable and adjust well to other animals, and they are also very kid-friendly. French Bulldogs make wonderful family pets and can live happily in many different environments. Papillon Papillons are known to be curious, energetic, and friendly. Despite their small size, these dogs need a good bit of exercise daily, so they’re not a great choice for someone looking for a low-energy lap dog. Training a Papillon is on the easier side, as they are very responsive, obedient, and intelligent. These social pups are friendly with everyone they meet, and they make excellent family companions. Golden Retriever With its outgoing personality and quintessential appearance, the Golden Retriever is one of the most popular dog breeds in America. Golden Retrievers are intelligent, confident, and good-natured dogs who love nothing more than to please their owners. The Golden’s eager-to-please nature, along with its ability to catch on to commands quickly, makes training simple. These pups have lots of energy, so anyone interested in a Golden Retriever should be sure that they can keep up with its exercise needs. Ready for Your New Puppy? Find Your Furry Friend on Lancaster Puppies Today! If you’re ready to bring a new puppy into your family, look no further than Lancaster Puppies! Start the journey today by browsing dogs from reputable breeders in your area.

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Aug 12, 2021

Get to Know the Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Pembroke Welsh Corgis have quickly become one of the most sought-after breeds in America. Most potential owners are originally drawn to the breed because of their cuteness, but this affectionate and agreeable breed has a lot to offer beyond its looks.  History of the Corgi You can trace the Corgi’s lineage back to as early as 1107 when Flemish weavers brought their herding dogs with them as they traveled to Wales. Henry I invited these weavers to Britain to live in Wales, and they brought the dogs they used to herd cattle and sheep. These dogs are the foundation of the Corgi breed and its evolution since. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi became a separate breed from its cousin the Cardigan Welsh Corgi in the late 1800s and gained immense popularity when Queen Elizabeth II got one in 1933. She hasn’t been without a Pembroke Welsh Corgi since, which has played a large role in the breed’s popularity to this day.  Corgi Characteristics Appearance and Coat Corgis are a big dog in a small package. At 10”-12” at the shoulder and 27-30 lbs Corgis are built long, low, and sturdy. Their short and powerful legs allow them to be quick and agile despite their size, and equipped them for a hard day's work of herding in their past.  They have a soft, light undercoat covered by a coarse outer coat. Their coat can be red, sable, fawn, black, or tan, and is often accented with white spots. Corgis shed all year round, but with regular brushing their coat is easy to maintain. One of their most recognizable features is their large, pointy ears that stand upright. Their dwarf legs give them a look unique to other dogs their size. The Majority of Pembroke Welsh Corgis have their tails docked 2-5 days after being born due to tradition or to abide by the breed standard.  Temperament Pembroke Welsh Corgis are great family dogs and are eager to please their owners any chance they get. They are very intelligent and rank 11th in Stanley Coren’s book, The Intelligence of Dogs. This intelligence combined with the eagerness to please their owners makes Corgis easy to train. They are gentle with children, but on some occasions, their herding instincts can cause them to “herd” children by nipping at their heels. Around the house, Corgis are affectionate and friendly, while being alert and wary of new visitors to the house.  Health The average Corgi lifespan is 12-13 years. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is typically a healthy breed but can be prone to some more serious health issues that should be scanned for.  Intervertebral Disc Disease: This condition occurs when a disc in your dog's spine is ruptured or herniated and liquid leaks out causing inflammation and pain. This disease will typically show up later in a Corgi’s life when their spine loses flexibility, making them more susceptible to injury.  Canine Hip Dysplasia: This condition occurs when the ball and socket of the hip do not fit properly and they rub and grind instead of sliding smoothly. Hip Dysplasia is genetic, and can also be caused by rapid growth, weight and nutrition issues, and certain types of exercise.  Obesity: Corgis are prone to obesity if their nutrition or exercise needs aren’t met. Corgis have a habit of eating more than they should, so they should be kept on a regimented diet. We recommend working with your vet to develop a plan that will give your corgi the nutrients it needs without overfeeding. We have also put together a guide to develop a feeding schedule for your puppy over on our blog.  Caring for a Corgi A Corgi’s Ideal Home Corgis are one of the rare breeds that can thrive in any living environment as long as they get moderate exercise daily. They make great apartment dogs and rank on many of the 10 best apartment breed lists.  If your family doesn’t go out regularly for runs or hikes, a large fenced-in yard is encouraged where you can play stimulating games with your furry friend.  Training a Corgi Corgis respond well to training but owners are encouraged to start the training young. Socializing Corgi puppies with as many people and animals as possible in the early years will ensure they are well-mannered adults. Check out this puppy socialization guide that can help as you work to socialize your puppy with family and other furry friends.  They are very smart and eager to please and take to training very well. They inherently have a mind of their own, but if training is started early they take to it quickly.  Exercise Corgis need moderate physical exercise daily to maintain their mental and physical health. They love long walks and slow jogs, but owners should be wary of taking them out in extreme cold or heat. They also thrive when doing physical activity that is also mentally stimulating. If you neglect exercise or playtime with your Corgi they may start to create their own games, which can be destructive. Things like barking, nipping at peoples’ feet, or destructive behavior can be side effects of an under-stimulated Corgi.  Grooming and Hygiene One of the most searched questions about this breed is, “Do Corgis Shed?” The answer is yes, they shed daily, but don’t let that scare you off! A daily brushing will alleviate much of the loose hair before it takes over your home.  You should also follow the recommended care for other breeds like daily ear checks, and regular nail trimmings.  Are you ready to take the plunge and begin looking for a Corgi puppy? Browse Lancaster Puppies to find your furry friend today!

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Jul 20, 2021

How to Make Your Backyard Dog-Friendly

Bringing a new furry friend home to your family is very exciting, but can be overwhelming for some first-time dog owners. Having a dog-friendly backyard will make your transition into dog ownership much smoother, and will give your new dog a fun place to play all year round. In this blog, we will go over some backyard ideas for dogs that are a must as you welcome the newest member of your family!  Backyard Dog Fences Adding a fence around your property provides you privacy while giving your dog a safe place to roam free and explore. There are lots of fence options out there, how do you decide which is best for you?  Security You are installing your backyard dog fence to keep your furry friend safe and sound on your property, so it is important to build a fence that is able to contain your dog. Breeds like Border Collies, Rottweilers, Labs, Pitbulls, and more can easily climb or jump a 4-foot fence. Make sure your fence is high enough to prevent your dog from jumping it, and you may need to take other precautions if your pup is especially crafty.  Invisible Dog Fences If your yard is too large for a traditional fence or you don’t want to obstruct your backyard view the invisible dog fence could be the right choice for you. These wireless or inground options provide invisible barriers that transmit an electrical current to your dog’s collar and range in cost from $900 to $1,500. These fences are extremely effective, but some dogs will accept the electrical current as the price for exiting the fenced area, and leave the yard at will. As you are thinking about this option it is important to understand your dog’s personality. If you think they have the temperament to ignore the electrical current, a traditional fence may be the right choice for your dog.  Dog-Friendly Ground Cover As you are choosing the ground for your backyard dog area there are lots of great options that each require different levels of care and upkeep.  Traditional Grass Nothing beats the feeling of freshly cut grass between your toes, but traditional grass can’t always withstand the daily wear and tear of dogs. Brown spots often appear in places where your dog urinates, and areas along your fence may be trampled down as your dog develops pacing patterns. While no live grass is immune to these things, there are some grass species that some dog owners have found to withstand these trials better than others.  Artificial Grass This is a very popular low-maintenance option and removes some of the stress about keeping your natural grass looking lush and green. Modern artificial turfs and grasses contain no lead or harmful chemicals, and remove the worry of lawn fertilizers and treatments coming in contact with your dog. This is also a great option for city dog owners with small yards as it doesn’t need sun or rain to maintain its look and provides a grass-like surface for your dog to do its business.  Mulch and Stone Mulch is a low-maintenance option that can withstand the heavy traffic your dogs bring to your backyard and can easily be raked back into place. The downside is that some owners have found that mulch can house fleas and other critters, and you have to keep an eye out for dyed mulches as these can be harmful to your pets.  Stone is another low-maintenance option that will look great, and stand up to your dog’s daily wear and tear. One of the biggest benefits of stone is that it is easy to pick up solid waste, and liquid waste just drains to the soil below. Stone heats up in the sun offering your dog a great place to sunbathe, but if you don’t have adequate shade this could be an issue during summer heat waves.  What Plants Aren’t Safe for Dogs? When spring rolls around and you make your trip to the greenhouse it is important to keep in mind that some plants are unsafe, and in some cases, poisonous to your furry friends. Some of these plants are only mildly toxic and can be safely displayed in your yard in a raised bed or fenced-off garden. Here is a handy guide to poisonous plants that you should avoid having in your yard, and we have outlined some of the most common below.  Daffodils: All parts of the daffodil are toxic to dogs, but the bulb is the most toxic. Symptoms of daffodil poisoning can include drooling, drowsiness, vomiting, diarrhea, seizures, and more.  Tulips: Again, all parts of the tulip are poisonous to dogs, and the bulb is the most harmful. Symptoms of tulip toxicity can include vomiting, diarrhea, lack of appetite, and depression.  Lilies: Most species of lilies are poisonous to dogs, but fatal cases of lily poisoning are rare. Chemicals in the lily can cause irritation and swelling in the mouth if eaten, as well as vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, abdominal pain, abnormal heart rate, and seizures.  This is something to keep in mind as you buy house plants as well, here is a pet-friendly plant guide that will help you as you decorate your yard and home for summer.  If you keep these things in mind as you plan your dog-friendly backyard your furry companion will have a safe and fun environment to roam free at your home.

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Jun 09, 2021

All About the Cavachon Dog Breed

In the days of designer dogs and hybrid breeds, you may find yourself asking, “What is a Cavachon?” Luckily, we’re here to help! Simply put, a Cavachon is a mix of a purebred Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and a purebred Bichon Frise, but there’s a lot more to it than that! Keep reading for a full overview of all things Cavachon. History of the Cavachon Like most designer dog breeds, the Cavachon’s history is fairly unclear. It's difficult to determine exactly when the Cavachon originated, but designer breeders in North America began intentionally mixing Cavaliers and Bichons around 1996. The goal in breeding these two dogs was to combine the best traits of the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and Bichon Frise into one lovable companion dog. The result was the Cavachon, and the breed quickly became more popular and in demand.  Today, the Cavachon is recognized by the American Canine Association (ACA), the American Canine Hybrid Club (ACHC), and multiple other similar dog clubs for designer and hybrid breeds. Cavachon Characteristics Appearance and Coat The Cavachon is a small to medium-sized dog. A full-grown Cavachon stands around 7 to 15 inches tall at the withers. The healthy weight for the breed ranges from 11 to 25 pounds, depending on sex. A Cavachon’s coat is a combination of the coat of a Cavalier and the coat of a Bichon, so it’s fluffy, wavy, and thick. Their coat color can be white, cream, apricot, or a mix of all three. It may also have tan or black. One of the most common questions that people interested in the breed have is, “do Cavachons shed?” The answer is yes, but not much. While no dog is completely non-shedding, the Cavachon is considered a hypoallergenic breed, meaning that its level of shedding is fairly low. Temperament The Cavachon is a loving, gentle breed that's very good with children, making it a great choice for families. Aside from children, Cavachons are friendly with just about everyone, including strangers and other dogs. Cavachons are social butterflies, and it's rare for them to turn down the chance to meet someone new, whether human or animal.  Health The Cavachon is generally a healthy breed, but it is prone to some of the health conditions that are faced by its parents: the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and the Bichon Frise. Some of the health issues that Cavachons are susceptible to include: Mitral Valve Disease: A degenerative disease that causes the heart’s valves to become thickened and deformed over time. It is most commonly found in older, small to medium-sized dogs. Syringomyelia: A condition that results in the buildup of fluid in the cavities within the spinal cord, causing an abnormal sensation in dogs. Atopic Dermatitis: A chronic, inherited condition that causes a dog to develop allergic symptoms to certain allergens.  Like with all dogs, it’s very important that you take your Cavachon for regular veterinary checkups to make sure they stay well and healthy. The average Cavachon lifespan is about 11 to 16 years. Caring for a Cavachon A Cavachon’s Ideal Home The Cavachon is a breed that’s suited for many different types of homes and lifestyles. Since they have a mild energy level and don’t bark too much, they’re a great choice for apartment living. Cavachons are highly adaptable dogs that are a great fit for novice dog owners and seniors alike. One thing to note is that Cavachons do not tolerate being left alone for long periods of time, as they can develop separation anxiety. That said, these dogs will do best in a home where someone is home with them throughout most of the day. Training a Cavachon The Cavachon is an intelligent breed that’s eager to learn and please, so they aren’t too difficult to train. Like many dogs, Cavachons benefit from training sessions that are short and to the point. Longer training sessions can lead to boredom or overstimulation. The Cavachon typically responds best to positive reinforcement and reward-based training. Exercise Cavachons aren’t overly energetic dogs, but they don’t like to lounge around the house all day either. In most cases, a long daily walk provides a sufficient amount of exercise for a Cavachon. Don’t forget to incorporate a daily play session or two into your routine as well! Grooming and Hygiene Since they are a relatively low-shedding breed, Cavachons are easy to groom and care for. Their coat should be brushed a few times a week. An important thing to note is that Cavachons are prone to ear infections, so a regular ear cleaning is a must. Additionally, you should trim your Cavachon’s nails when they get too long. A good rule of thumb is that if you can hear your dog’s nails “clicking” when they walk on a hard surface, they are probably too long and should be trimmed. Have you decided that a Cavachon is the breed for you? Browse Lancaster Puppies to find your new furry friend today!

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May 10, 2021

Flea and Tick Collars: Do They Really Work?

Flea and tick prevention is one of the most important things that all pet parents should consider. These pesky parasites can be a headache for both you and your pet, so prevention is key. Flea and tick collars are just one of the options that dog owners have, but some people question whether or not they really work. Keep reading for an overview of flea and tick collars, how they work, and how to decide if they are right for your pooch. How Do Flea and Tick Collars Work? Do flea and tick collars really work? In short, yes, they do! These collars can be very effective at repelling pests, as well as treating them. There are several different types of collars, including traditional and newer styles. The traditional style of flea and tick collars works by emitting a chemical that is toxic to fleas as a gas. This means that any pests that come close to the collar are killed. However, the older styles of flea collars often have the active ingredients coating the outside of the collar, rather than embedded inside of it. As a result, the amount of chemicals being released may not always be consistent, causing the collar to become less effective over time.  Luckily, many newer styles of flea and tick collars are designed to avoid the issues that may have been present with traditional collars. Unlike older collar styles, newer flea collars have the pest-killing chemical embedded within them. This allows for a steady and continuous release of the active ingredients from the collar, which are then spread naturally over a pet’s skin and coat to repel and kill fleas. Benefits and Drawbacks of Flea and Tick Collars While the newer styles of flea and tick collars are effective and safe, there are still some advantages and disadvantages of using collars for flea and tick prevention for dogs. Advantages of Flea and Tick Collars One of the biggest benefits of using a flea collar is how long it lasts. Newer styles of flea collars can be effective for up to 8 months, while other flea and tick meds, like spot-on treatments, only last about 30 days. Flea collars also tend to be less expensive and easier to obtain than other flea and tick prevention methods. They do not require a prescription and can be purchased at your local pet store. Before buying, be sure to ask your veterinarian for their recommendations on brands of collars, as there are some cheap collars on the market that do not work very well. Disadvantages of Flea and Tick Collars Depending on whether you opt for an older or newer style of flea collar, there can be some downsides to using them for your dog. Because they are worn around the neck, flea collars are effective primarily in that area, leaving your pup’s hindquarters more susceptible to pests. Additionally, flea collars may irritate some pets’ skin, so be sure to keep this in mind when considering one for your dog. Additional Flea and Tick Prevention Tips While most are very effective, no method of flea and tick prevention will completely eliminate the chances of your pet getting fleas or ticks. That said, it’s important to take additional precautions to further prevent pests and protect your furry friend: Groom your pet regularly. Pay special attention to signs of ticks or fleas, and use a flea comb on occasion for a closer inspection. Wash your pet’s bedding frequently. Once a week is recommended, and be sure to wash in hot water. Also don’t forget to vacuum your carpets on a regular basis. Know the signs of ticks or fleas. Don’t assume that your pet is pest-free just because you don’t see any fleas or ticks on them. Be on the lookout for signs such as excessive scratching, biting, or loss of fur. Talk to your veterinarian. When in doubt, talk to your vet. They will be able to give you the best advice when it comes to a flea and tick prevention or treatment plan for your pet. All in all, flea and tick collars are an effective way to protect your pet from pests, and they are definitely something to consider for your pup.  If you’re looking for the newest addition to your family, be sure to check out the puppies for sale on Lancaster Puppies today!

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Mar 24, 2021

Tips for Finding a Responsible Breeder: What to Look for, and What to Avoid

Finding a good dog breeder isn’t easy. Sadly, there are bad breeders out there, and many people buy puppies from them because they don’t know any better. For this reason, it’s very important to know what to look for in a breeder to make sure that they are legitimate and reputable. By the same token, it’s also crucial to recognize the warning signs of breeders that may not be trustworthy. Signs of a Responsible Dog Breeder Shows Interest in Learning About You A responsible breeder wants to make sure that their puppies are going to safe and loving homes, and they care about matching their puppies with the right people. They will ask questions about you, your family, and your lifestyle in order to determine if their puppy is the right fit for your home environment. They may even ask to meet your entire family, which just goes to show that the breeder truly wants their dogs to be in the best possible homes. It’s also important to note that legitimate breeders understand that finding the right puppy takes time, and they’ll never pressure you to make a decision.  Red Flag: Unlike reputable breeders, irresponsible breeders are more financially motivated. They aren’t concerned about what’s in the puppy’s best interest, which is why they will often sell their puppies without bothering to ask any questions or get to know you. They’re Knowledgeable About Their Puppies Good, responsible breeders are experts on the breed of their puppies. They will be able to tell you all sorts of information about the breed’s temperament, expected size, and traits. These breeders will encourage you to ask questions and happily provide answers. Additionally, a reputable breeder should also be knowledgeable about the genetic history of their puppies. Red Flag: If someone is not knowledgeable about the breed of dog they’re selling, it’s highly likely that they are not a reputable breeder. It’s next to impossible for someone to properly breed healthy dogs without extensive knowledge of the breed. They Welcome You to Their Home or Facility Legitimate breeders will welcome you to their property with open arms. As a matter of fact, they’ll encourage you to visit as often as you’d like. A reputable breeder will take pride in the order and cleanliness of their facility, and they’ll be happy to show you around and let you see where the puppies are born and raised. Red Flag: Steer clear of breeders who do not allow you to visit where they raise their puppies. For example, if a seller suggests meeting in a parking lot or another public space instead of at their property, there’s a good chance that you’re dealing with a bad breeder. The Puppy’s Parents are On-Site A proper breeder will be more than willing to let you meet the parents of their puppies. While it’s not uncommon for a pup’s father to not be present, the breeder should still be able to provide you with information about him. Pay careful attention to the puppy’s mother, as she’ll be a close reflection of what your puppy will be like as an adult. Red Flag: If a seller doesn’t have the puppy’s parents available to meet, or is reluctant to let you meet them, this is definitely a sign that something is off. If someone is not able to show you the parents of the puppies they’re selling (or the mother at the very least), this could mean that the puppies were already separated from their mother, and possibly too early. They Specialize in Only One or Two Breeds Legitimate breeders only specialize in one breed of dog, or sometimes two. This is because every breed of dog is unique and has its own features, traits, and needs. Some breeds even have their own individual health problems. By focusing on only one or two breeds, breeders are able to become as knowledgeable about their puppies as possible and provide expert advice. Red Flag: If a person is selling more than one or two different dog breeds, this is usually a red flag. Likewise, if the seller is advertising puppies in “rare” colors or sizes, such as Double Dapple Dachshunds, stay away. These characteristics do not typically align with a dog’s breed standard and can lead to health problems. They Have Medical Records On-Hand Reputable breeders will always have their puppies’ medical records on hand, and they will be happy to show them to you. Aside from vaccination and deworming records, good breeders should also have proof of health screenings, such as the OFA (Orthopedic Foundation for Animals), which tests for orthopedic issues like hip and elbow dysplasia. The breeder should also inform you about certain health issues that the breed is susceptible to down the road. Red Flag: Stay away from sellers who are not able to provide accurate vet records for their puppies. If they can’t supply records, it likely means that they don’t even have them. Puppies that do not have reliable medical documentation may be coming from a bad breeder and could have veterinary issues. According to the Humane Society, many puppies that come from illegitimate breeders can suffer from problems like internal parasites, respiratory issues, ear problems, and congenital defects. They Let You Return the Puppy (If Need Be) Any responsible breeder understands that sometimes, things don’t go as planned, which is why they will take the dog back if you are unable to keep it. In fact, many breeders will want you to sign a contract stating that you will return the dog to them should you ever be unable to care for it. At the very least, they will provide you with instructions on how to proceed if things don’t work out with your puppy. Red Flag: Irresponsible breeders typically do not give much thought to their puppies after being sold. If a seller does not mention what you should do with your puppy if you’re not able to keep it (or worse, says they are not willing to take a dog back at all), it’s probably a good idea to find a different breeder. Now that you know what to look for in a breeder, and the red flags to watch out for, you’re all set to find your new furry friend!

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Mar 24, 2021

Do Goldendoodles Shed? How to Prepare for Your New (Furry) Best Friend

If you were one of millions who spent the last year upgrading your interior, you might be wondering: which dog breed will do the least damage to my furniture when it comes to excess hair? Luckily, you have several options! But one of the most popular is none other than the Goldendoodle. In addition to blending the best of both Golden Retrievers and Standard or Mini-Poodles, this is one furry companion that can potentially mesh well with your pad’s new layout.  With a little background information and grooming basics, you can decide which type of Goldendoodle hair is the best for your budget and your home decor theme. Does it matter whether you choose a larger or smaller Goldendoodle, when it comes to excess hair? Are there ways to tell how much one puppy will shed, relative to another of the same breed? If these are questions you have been wondering about, continue reading. We’ll tackle this and whether there is truth when people say, “Choose a Goldendoodle because they never shed.” Embrace the Best of Both Worlds: Crossing Golden Retrievers with Poodles Why combine a Golden Retriever with a Poodle in the first place? Whether your pup is a mixture of a standard-sized poodle or a miniature one, you will enjoy the benefits that are associated with the breed, which includes a keen intelligence. As such, you can plan on spending less time training your poodle both for skills or housebreaking. Golden Retrievers, on the other hand, are well known for their friendly disposition which makes them a perfect choice for a family or companion animal and a popular breed for mixing custom combinations. As you can see, when it comes to the “inside” of a Goldendoodle, “loyal, smart, friendly and eager to train” are all appropriate descriptors.    But what does this mean for the shedding question - are Goldendoodles a good option for people looking for a non-shedding breed? This depends upon your individual puppy. Believe it or not, your furry friend is more akin to a snowflake than a generalizable formula in that he or she is unique. As stated above, your Goldendoodle is a combination of the best of two different breeds. That is, you cannot determine if one Goldendoodle will shed more or less than another merely by looking at them. Because this breed is a hybrid of two types, what you can expect from their fur largely depends upon which “side” your puppy leans toward. One that takes on more qualities from the Golden Retriever parent’s line can be expected to shed more (as does the original breed). A puppy that takes after its Poodle parent, can be expected to shed less in general.   Truth vs. Fiction: Do Goldendoodles Shed a Lot? You can expect the same from either “version” small or large: Whether you are looking for a large or small non-shedding dog, the actual physical size of your future best friend does not make a difference when it comes to what to expect from their hair care needs.   What’s your Goldendoodle’s type? According to groomers, this breed typically presents with one of three types of hair: straight, wavy, or curly. As you might have guessed, straight hair is usually regarded as the easiest when it comes to care, as brushing is effortless and bathing is less burdensome. As the medium difficulty option, wavy hair is actually the most common type you will encounter. The ability of curly hair to develop into unruly, tight ringlets requires the skills of a professional groomer if you do not happen to be one yourself! Typical grooming costs for a Goldendoodle: Seeing as the most popular types of coats include the more difficult-to-manage options, you should most likely budget professional grooming into your future puppy’s monthly list of fees. Depending upon where you live and whether “mom and pop” businesses have a presence there, on the high end, you should budget for about $100 per session. In terms of timing, most Goldendoodles should be professionally trimmed every 7 to 12 weeks depending upon their hair growth. Don’t forget to ask groomers to shave or pull the hair from the inside of the ear, as this is also a popular area for Goldendoodles to encounter mats or tangles.     As you can gather, there is much more that goes into planning which type of Goldendoodle is the right one for you. On top of deciding upon a larger or smaller puppy, you can also ponder whether the type of hair it has is better or worse for your wallet before making your decision. This way, you can be sure to finance the right amount relative to the type of dog you select.  Curly, Wavy, or Straight? Whatever You Decide, There’s a Goldendoodle For You! Now that you understand what is needed when it comes to planning for the grooming needs of your future best friend, you can decide which variation is right for you (and your budget). If you would prefer to keep costs lower, you can always find a straight-haired Goldendoodle. If the curly locks of the ringlet option strike your fancy, simply know moving forward that more will be required when it comes to managing the mane situation.    Get in touch with us today, or browse available puppies, to find the perfect furry companion!

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Feb 23, 2021

What’s it Like Living with a Boxer?

Upbeat, fun-loving, and affectionate, it’s no surprise that the Boxer ranks among the top dog breeds in America. If you’re thinking of adding one of these pups to your family, read on for a complete overview of all things Boxers. History of the Boxer Dog Breed While the Boxer’s ancestors can be traced back to ancient times, the Boxer dog breed that we know today descends from two dogs of the (now extinct) Bullenbeisser breed from Germany: the Danziger Bullenbeisser and the Brabanter Bullenbeisser. Both of these dogs were used by hunters and noblemen for chasing large game, and also as guard dogs.  During the mid-1800s, German hunters began crossing their Bullenbeissers with Mastiff-type dogs and Bulldogs in an effort to combine the best traits of all three breeds. The resulting breed was a tough, strong dog with a powerful jaw. This dog was the foundation for a completely new breed: the Boxer, which became fully established by 1900.  Despite receiving recognition from the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1904, Boxers were not well-known in the United States until soldiers started bringing them back from Germany at the end of World War II. Once they arrived in America, however, Boxers gained much more popularity and are now among the most popular dog breeds in the United States. Boxer Characteristics Appearance A member of the Working Group, the Boxer is a medium to large-sized dog, standing around 21 to 25 inches tall at the withers. Depending on sex, a healthy weight for a Boxer ranges from 55 to 70 pounds. A Boxer’s coat is short, smooth, and shiny. In terms of color, their coats can either be fawn or brindle. Fawn ranges from light tan to mahogany, while brindle is made up of black, tiger-like stripes on a fawn background. Some Boxers will also have white markings on their stomach or feet. Temperament Boxers are active, playful family dogs that have earned a reputation as both protective guardians and silly companions. They are very affectionate and difficult to provoke to anger, making them great with children. Boxers tend to be a bit distrustful of strangers at first, but they typically respond well to friendly people. Regardless, early socialization for the Boxer is a must.  Health Generally speaking, the Boxer is a healthy breed. However, like all dogs, they are at risk for certain health conditions. One of these is Boxer Cardiomyopathy, or Boxer Arrhythmic Cardiomyopathy, an inherited condition in which a dog’s heart beats erratically as a result of an electrical conduction disorder.  Boxers are also prone to hip and elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, and aortic and subaortic stenosis (AS/SAS). Reputable breeders will screen their dogs for these health conditions before breeding, so be sure to keep that in mind when finding your Boxer dog puppy. Steer clear of breeders who do not provide adequate documentation from a veterinarian. It’s also worth noting that, due to some of its physical characteristics, the Boxer does not have a high tolerance for extreme heat or cold. That said, you should not leave a Boxer outside for prolonged periods of time. Caring for a Boxer A Boxer’s Ideal Home Known for their love and loyalty, Boxers make wonderful family dogs. They are gentle and patient with children, and they can usually get along well with other pets. It’s important to note that Boxers are high-energy dogs, so make sure that you have the time and energy to give them the activity they need before bringing one into your home. When they’re not playing or romping around, a Boxer can be quite the lapdog. In fact, many Boxers will try to be as close in proximity to their humans as possible. As long as they receive plenty of exercise and playtime, Boxers are great family companions that will do well in a variety of different households. With adequate activity, they can even adapt to apartment living. Training Best Practices Like with all dogs, it’s important to start training your Boxer as soon as you bring them home. These dogs respond best to firm, but fun training. An intelligent breed, Boxers can become bored with repetition, so be sure to keep them on their toes with interesting and engaging training sessions. A Boxer will also benefit from positive reinforcement in the form of treats and praise. Potty training your Boxer should begin right away. Establishing a consistent schedule is key when it comes to housetraining. Taking your puppy outside on a regular schedule will help to establish a routine and prevent accidents in the house. With patience and consistency, Boxers can typically be potty trained in a matter of months. Exercise It’s no secret that Boxers are among the more energetic dog breeds. That said, they need ample exercise every day to keep them from developing boredom-based behaviors like digging holes or chewing through furniture.  Additionally, make sure to always keep your Boxer on a leash or in a fenced-in area whenever they are outside. Due to their hunting and chasing instincts, these dogs should never be allowed to run loose. Grooming and Hygiene Due to their short and smooth coat, the Boxer doesn’t require too much grooming. In most cases, weekly brushing with a firm bristle brush or rubber grooming mitt is all it takes to reduce shedding and keep the dog’s coat looking shiny and healthy. Boxers are generally clean dogs, so frequent baths aren’t necessary unless they get dirty.  Other areas of hygiene include teeth brushing and nail care. It’s recommended that you brush your Boxer’s teeth several times a week to prevent bacteria buildup and remove tartar. In terms of nail care, you should trim your Boxer’s nails at least once a month, unless your dog wears them down naturally. A good rule of thumb is that if you can hear your dog’s nails clicking on the floor, they’re too long. If you’ve determined that it’s time to add a Boxer dog puppy to your family, look no further than Lancaster Puppies! Browse Boxer puppies for sale from reputable breeders and find your new furry friend today!

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Feb 01, 2021

Five Examples of Healthy Supplements and Extra Nutrition for Dogs

Lately, there's been a surge of interest in CBD products for people - and dogs! When it comes to the health of your pup, it's more important than ever to do some research. We've taken a look at some of the top variants of supplements for pups, including CBD products, to give you a good idea of what to look for. Read on to learn more about the steps you can take when it comes to ensuring the long, happy life of your dog! 1. CBD Supplements: What Would My Vet Say About Using These for My Dog? We can always turn to the personal recommendations and opinions of educated veterinary professionals! According to one poll from the Brightfield Group and Nielsen, when asked about whether vets used CBD products on their own pets at home, nearly 60 percent confirmed doing so during 2017. In that same year, nearly 70 percent of those animal medical professionals polled reported considering CBD to be somewhat helpful for the management of anxiety in pets. On the plus side, a lack of beneficial data is also matched with a near absence of information that would suggest the use of CBD supplements for canines can cause moderate or serious harm. At 80 percent, vets were overwhelmingly supportive of the notion that no significant side effects had been witnessed during their practice.  2. CBD Oils vs. Hemp Oils: Understanding the Basic Differences and Benefits for Canines In addition to understanding the differences between CBD and THC, it is important to realize that Hemp Oil and CBD Oil supplements are not one and the same, either. The former of these are made from a process that includes extracting oil from hemp seeds, whereas the latter is made from extractions from the actual plant. Where hemp oil can be an excellent source of plant-based protein generally, the process used to obtain CBD renders it a more appropriate one for regulating biological functions, including hormones, sleep, mood, and immunity. 3. Supplements That Are Generally Recommended for Family Pets, Regardless of Type Calcium, B vitamins, and antioxidants, for example, are all great places to start when looking to fill in the gaps that your pet might be missing in their day-to-day meals. The first of these is crucial for the strength of your pup’s dentition, whereas antioxidants help to ward off infections, diseases, and even cancer.  Last but not least, B vitamins (of which there are several!) can be given to boost cell growth and division on top of being picked up by your pet’s skin, eye, and liver cells which additionally benefit. 4. Specific Supplements: Options and Basics If you are partial to canine companions, all supplements are not created equal when it comes to investing in their long-term health. Features you should look for when selecting a supplement include ones that are comprehensive, are labeled with “all in one” formulas, support a healthy immune system, and mention benefitting coat and skin health.  You should also know that most supplements on the market have widely available comments and reviews online, as well as through your veterinarian. If your dog suffers from hairballs, you should also consider boosting his diet with one capable of managing digestion. 5. The Final Combo: Benefits from Niacin, Riboflavin, and B12 In addition to the supplements listed above, you can incorporate a broad range into Fido’s diet, regardless of which brand you are providing them daily as their major source of nutrition. Riboflavin, Niacin, and B12 are a trifecta of goodness for your pup, as these help their enzymes function properly. Vitamin C interestingly, unlike in humans, is already produced naturally within your dog’s liver, although it still serves the same purpose of functioning as an antioxidant. Interested in learning more about the potential benefits of the supplements and solutions mentioned above? Check out the American Veterinary Medical Association’s snapshot article addressing these and more options you might consider.

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Nov 02, 2020

Tips for Vacationing With Your Dog

Now that the beautiful and scenic autumn weather is about to make a return, you might be wondering about how to vacation with dogs or not just survive but thrive in an overnight hotel setting. Sound familiar? Read on to discover handy tips for vacationing with dogs, whether you are beach, mountain, or rolling plains bound. Vacationing With Pups: What You Need to Know and How to Plan  One of the first steps you should consider when planning your next trip with Fido along for the ride? Their personality! To be certain, no one knows your dog like you do. That’s why you should try to incorporate their potential preferences into not only your destination, but also your accommodations. While you decide on a target location, think about your dog’s take on venues with lakes, beaches, hilly trails, or city streets. Which would your pup prefer? When selecting a hotel or home rental, apart from the obvious filter selection to ensure you are investing in a dog-friendly option, be sure you ask about policies regarding staying with your dog versus being allowed to leave for periods of time as long as a phone number to reach you is on hand. Particularly depending upon the age of your dog, you should consider categories like noise level and the general level of crowdedness of the areas you plan to visit upon arrival. If you are from a small town and lodge in a bustling city, especially if this is your pup’s first time traveling, you will want to go prepared. Dog Vacation Care: Additional Factors to Consider and What to Pack Whether you are a first-time or long-time dog owner, you have probably already discovered some similarities between being a dog parent and having a toddler! Not unlike the latter, there are also several measures you can take to ensure your dog’s experience commuting to, staying at, and returning from your vacation. Below you can find a few of our suggestions, and feel free to ask your veterinarian for tips about how to account for first aid and emergency measures at your next scheduled appointment. Familiar Toy or Blanket Although the image of a small child carrying around a blanket or teddy is not one you might think of when vacationing with Fido, they really help! Add in the keen sense of smell your pup has, and you can begin to appreciate the difference packing the right toy or familiar blanket can make. If you gave your dog a first item, that might be your best bet as it is likely your pup has internalized the scent.   An Extra Set of Travel Identification Tags Usually, one of the first things a new pet owner looks forward to is selecting the identification tags that will go on to show off your dog’s personality. But it often does not occur to even the most seasoned of pet owners to buy another set for times you’d like to travel with them along. Keeping a spare set of harnesses, collars, leashes and tags in your car or luggage is a great way to prevent being stranded without these must-have items. In the worst-case scenario, however, you can always locate your nearest pet store, and obtain these items on the road or at your destination. Before the fall season settles in and you solidify your next set of travel plans, consider the needs and other must-haves of your pup. In addition to taking these into account when selecting where it is you are traveling to; you should also proactively consider the experience your pet will have while at the hotel (as well as whether you will be required to be there 24/7).  Looking for a new travel buddy? Find your newest addition on Lancaster Puppies today! Show Me the Puppies!

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Sep 09, 2020

Border Collie Puppies: A Guide for New Owners

Known for its intelligence and exceptional working abilities, the Border Collie is a breed like no other. If you’re looking for an active and loyal companion who will keep you on your toes, the Border Collie may be the breed for you! Keep reading to learn more about this wonderful breed. History of the Border Collie The Border Collie first appeared in the United Kingdom during the 1800s, where it was used as a herding dog and a guard dog, along with several other sheep herding breeds. Over time, certain kinds of these sheepdogs became preferable over others. So, to determine the superior sheepdogs, a trial was held in 1873. The standout breeds from the trial were then bred for their exceptional working abilities, which led to the creation of the Border Collie. The Border Collie arrived in the United States during the early 1900s, and it didn’t take long for the breed to gain popularity. The Border Collie was especially popular among shepherds and farmers due to its strong obedience capabilities.  As time went on, the Border Collie’s stellar herding abilities led many to believe that the breed should only be bred as a working dog, not as a show dog. As a result, many Border Collie fans actively fought against the use of Border Collies as show dogs, for fear that it may cause a decline in the breed’s working capabilities. However, despite some pushback, the American Kennel Club (AKC) officially recognized the Border Collie in 1995. Border Collie Characteristics Appearance The Border Collie is a medium-sized dog, standing about 18-22 inches tall at the withers on average. A healthy weight for a Border Collie is between 25 and 45 pounds, depending on sex. Border Collies have a dense double coat that varies from straight to slightly curly. In terms of coat color, most Border Collies are a mix of black and white or brown and white. However, these pups can also be tricolored, brindle, merle, or single-colored. Temperament The Border Collie has a reputation for being one of the most intelligent dog breeds. Couple its smarts with boundless energy and remarkable agility, and you have a wonderful herding dog, a spectacular competitor, or maybe just a faithful and fun-loving companion for the outdoors. Due to their history as sheep herding dogs, Border Collies love to work and stay busy, so it’s important to keep them on their toes. These pups love having a job to do, and they can quickly become destructive or mischievous out of boredom. That said, the Border Collie isn’t the type of dog who will lie quietly on the floor and relax while you’re watching TV or lounging around. These dogs are very energetic, and it’s essential that they receive plenty of exercise and mental stimulation daily. When it comes to friendliness, Border Collies are a bit on the shy side. However, when properly socialized, these dogs have little difficulty getting along with other people and animals. Health The Border Collie is generally a healthy breed, but like all dogs, it’s susceptible to certain health issues. One of these is hip dysplasia, a genetic disease characterized by a malformed hip socket. Dogs with hip dysplasia will appear normal, so the condition is diagnosed through X-ray screening. Depending on severity, treatment for hip dysplasia can range from pain medication to surgery. Border Collies can also be affected by Collie Eye Anomaly (CEA), an inherited condition that causes abnormalities in a dog’s eyes. The severity of this condition varies, but it can lead to slight or total vision loss in some cases. While there’s no cure for CEA, it can be detected in puppies as young as 5-8 weeks, so it’s important to have your Border Collie puppy examined as early as possible. Aside from hip dysplasia and Collie Eye Anomaly, other conditions that can occur in Border Collies are epilepsy, allergies, hypothyroidism, and Osteochondrosis Dissecans (OCD). Caring for a Border Collie The Breed’s Ideal Home A Border Collie will thrive in a household that can provide it with plenty of exercise and playtime. If you’re considering adopting a Border Collie, you must be sure that you can keep up with the breed’s high energy and exercise needs, as a Border Collie that isn’t given enough mental and physical stimulation is likely to develop problematic behaviors. Due to how active they are, Border Collies typically do best in homes where they have plenty of room to run. A large, fenced-in yard is ideal for this breed. Keep in mind that, unless you are extremely active, getting a Border Collie is not recommended if you live in an apartment. Training Best Practices Training a Border Collie isn’t challenging, but it’s still important to start training the day you bring your puppy home. During puppyhood, Border Collies are able to absorb a lot of information, so it’s a key time to teach them some essential obedience skills and commands. Before anything else, though, it’s essential that you establish leadership and dominance with a Border Collie puppy. Once they know that you’re in charge, they will follow rules willingly. One of the first places to start when training a Border Collie is with potty training. Take your puppy outside frequently; about once an hour. Even if they don’t go potty every time, it’s valuable to establish a consistent schedule and prevent any accidents in the house. When your puppy does go to the bathroom outside, be sure to praise them or give them a treat to reinforce the behavior. Another area of Border Collie training to begin right away is socialization. Once your puppy has its shots and vaccines, start introducing them to different people, animals, and places. In order to learn how to behave around other people and animals, a Border Collie puppy must first become accustomed to being in social situations. Exercise As mentioned above, Border Collies require lots of daily exercise. At a minimum, this breed needs 30 to 60 minutes of physical activity every day, but preferably more. Border Collies love to run, so it’s recommended to take them to a secure area where they can run off-leash. Dog parks can be great for Border Collies, but only if they get along well with other dogs. It’s important to note that exercise for a Border Collie doesn’t stop with physical activity. This is a smart breed that requires a good deal of mental stimulation, too. As a Border Collie owner, it’s crucial to set aside time each day to play with your dog and have training sessions. Try to focus on activities that will challenge and stimulate your Border Collie’s mind. Grooming and Hygiene While Border Collies do shed quite a bit, their coat does not need excessive grooming or maintenance. It is recommended that you brush your Border Collie once or twice a week to prevent their fur from matting. However, more frequent brushing will likely be necessary during shedding seasons in the spring and fall. In terms of bathing, Border Collies only require baths on an as-needed basis. Additionally, their teeth should be brushed a few times a week to get rid of tartar and prevent bacteria buildup.  If you’ve determined that the Border Collie is the breed for you, find your new furry friend using Lancaster Puppies today! Show Me the Border Collies!

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Jul 29, 2020

Maximizing Together Time: Why Summer Is a Great Time to Get a Puppy

Thinking about buying a new puppy? If so, you’re in luck! Summer is the perfect time of year to bring home your newest furry friend. Here are some of the top reasons why summertime is great for adding a puppy to your family. 4 Reasons to Get a Puppy in the Summer 1. More Time Together Many people have more spare time during the summer, which means more time to spend raising and training a new puppy! If your schedule is more open in the summertime, this will give you plenty of time to focus on your puppy. From introducing your pup to new people to training and developing a feeding schedule, there are countless ways you and your new friend can spend the summer days. 2. Keep Your Children Entertained If you have children, this is all the more reason to get a puppy in the summer. Since the kids will be on summer vacation, they'll have a lot more time to bond with your new pooch. If you’ve determined that your family is ready for the commitment, a puppy is a great way to keep your kids busy all summer long. Plus, if your children are old enough, they can even lend a helping hand with training and housebreaking! 3. Sunshine Helps In terms of potty training a new puppy, many dog owners agree that doing so in warmer weather is ideal. It goes without saying that you’ll need to take your pup outside for frequent potty breaks, which is likely a lot more inviting when the weather is warm.  Fall and winter present more of a challenge when it comes to potty training a puppy. No one enjoys being outside when it’s cold, rainy, or snowing, and chances are your puppy won’t either. Additionally, breeds that are more sensitive to cold temperatures will probably be much more willing to go outside during the summertime. 4. More Daylight One of the best things about summer is the long, warm days. More daylight means that you and your family will have more time to spend outside with your puppy. It’s no secret that puppies have boundless energy, so the long summer days allow for plenty of time for walking, playing, and enjoying the outdoors. Puppy Summer Safety Tips While summer is undoubtedly a great time to add a puppy to your family, there are still some things to keep in mind when it comes to keeping your puppy safe. Keep Your Puppy Hydrated During the hot summer months, your little pup has a much higher chance of becoming dehydrated while playing outdoors. The combination of their low body mass and the temperature outside makes it much easier for your dog to become dehydrated. That said, it’s important to take note of the symptoms of dehydration: Heavy panting Thick saliva Loss of skin elasticity Dry nose Vomiting and/or diarrhea Low energy levels and lethargy If your puppy starts to exhibit any of these symptoms, be sure to take them to the vet right away. Be Mindful of Paws During puppyhood, a dog’s paw pads are more delicate and sensitive, so you’ll need to keep a close eye on what your puppy is stepping on during the summer. One of the most important things to be mindful of is hot surfaces, especially concrete and asphalt.  Before taking your puppy onto a paved or cement surface, make sure it’s not too hot for their paws by placing your hand on the ground for a few seconds. If it’s too hot for your hand, it’s too hot for your puppy’s paws, too. For this reason, it’s a good idea to keep your pup off the pavement in the middle of the day and limit walking hours to the morning and late evening. Never Leave Your Puppy in the Car Hopefully, this goes without saying, but you should never leave your puppy in the car during the summer. You may think leaving your pet in the car with the windows cracked for a few minutes is no big deal, but it can take less than 10 minutes for your puppy to overheat inside a hot car. Not only is it extremely dangerous, but leaving your pet inside a hot car is actually illegal in many states. As long as you’re well-prepared and ready for the commitment, summer is a wonderful time to get a puppy. Find the newest addition to your family on Lancaster Puppies today! See Puppies For Sale Here!

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Jun 26, 2020

Why People Pay a Little More for Certain Pups

You’ve been researching dog breeds since you were seven. You’ve known you’re compatible with Shih-Poos and Corgis since you embraced apartment living. We get it! You know your lifestyle, and the breed to match it, better than anyone else.  What many people do not research, however, is the potential variation in cost estimates when it comes to planning a new furry addition! If you’re the type who has your heart set on a specific partner (think: Afghan Hound or Chow Chow), you might be interested to learn about which breeds tend to carry higher price tags than others in more ways than one.  We’ll also bring you up-to-speed about how other common factors, like health considerations and ensuring yours is a properly bred puppy, can also drive up the cost of your new best friend. Does your “Pick” Make the High / Low Cost Lists? Beginning with the most expensive breeds, let's whittle our way down to which types of pups you should expect to pay more or less for depending upon the moniker. You might be surprised that breed makes such a difference, but you shouldn’t be! Considering the level of work, care, and special consideration for potential health issues that go into rearing man’s best friend. Most Expensive – Low Chen and Mastiff One of the most recognizable breeds from the annual Westminster dog show -and also known for its otherwise unmanageable mane- this “little lion dog” is synonymous with high cost due in part to its historical popularity, but also because it matters where a puppy comes from in terms of breeder experience. After all, you’re not only paying for a puppy when you factor in price. You are also investing in the knowledge, expertise, and experience of your breeder. Known fondly as one of the “best breeds for kids”, the Mastiff may not be the most popular among neighbors, but is sure to be the glue of the family unit at home. Why the high cost in this case? Take a moment to consider the importance that a dog this size, also comes equipped with a noble, timid, and friendly personality. Add on top of that the protection against congenital health conditions. Worth the investment and peace of mind? We thought so! Less Expensive – Border Collie and Beagle Thanks to their perfect pairing with single apartment dwellers and families with large backyards alike, Border Collies top the list of less expensive puppies on the market. Thanks to their relatively low-maintenance grooming schedule and minimal health issues (although, keep an eye out for eye and hip problems), these furry friends won’t necessarily set your bank account back at the time of purchase. Similarly, Beagles are also easy to care for when it comes to grooming. Even better, you can expect the typical pup to live 11 to 15 years. A word to the wise: be wary of prices that seem too good or low to be true (because they probably are!). Beagles in particular come with a history of problems such as hip dysplasia, allergies, and chronic ear infections. This means you should plan to spend somewhere in the middle of the highest and lowest prices you see.  Other Factors to Consider – Grooming, Lifetime Healthcare Costs, Pet Insurance While it’s certainly helpful to know a ballpark estimate in terms of what to expect to pay for a pup by breed, you should also consider several other variables. These include both short and long-term expenses, such as grooming, veterinary care, and medication. Grooming As mentioned above, you should consider whether the regular maintenance needs of your pet are in sync with your personal schedule and style. A Beagle, for example, will not require the same level of regular brushing, trimming, and upkeep as a Shih Tzu or Standard Poodle. If you are not comfortable with the idea of clipping your puppy's nails (regardless of hair care!), you should also factor this in as a regular monthly cost when calculating your budget.  Lifetime Healthcare Costs Speaking of budgets, have you created one that reflects a timeline beginning from the adoption process, first-time and ongoing veterinary care, spaying or neutering, annual wellness visits, emergency care, dental, and medication? If that sounds like a lot of items to you, you’d be correct! The most important preparatory activity one can do prior to making a final purchase decision is to write out the pros and cons of each breed and age you’re considering. Which will, on top of being the most or least expensive short-term, also require additional long-term investments? Pet Insurance Last but not least, you’re likely to consider investing in pet insurance, as this is a popular way to save on the longer-term costs associated with your fuzzy companion. Not unlike insurance for a human person or child, pet insurance is a smart way to plan ahead for unforeseen emergencies, surgeries, or other critical care treatments. Which other costs have you experienced when purchasing and/or bringing home a new puppy?  See Puppies For Sale Here!

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May 29, 2020

The First 48 Hours With Your New Puppy: What to Expect

Bringing a new puppy home can be a simultaneously exciting and nerve-wracking experience. The joy of providing a forever home for an adorable puppy can also be met with a little hesitance - that you might do something wrong, or your property might be damaged by an untrained puppy on the loose. The first 48 hours with your new puppy can be unpredictable and even restless, but making it through the first few days is the hardest part. After that, you will see your new friend settling into routines and adjusting to their unfamiliar environment. If you’re serious about raising a puppy, don’t let the potential stresses of the first 48 hours discourage you from going forward with adopting or purchasing one. Remaining diligent and preparing yourself for some common obstacles that new dog owners face early on will give you the confidence to conquer the first 48 hours.  Puppy-Proofing Your Home Even before your puppy sets foot in your home, puppy-proofing your house is crucial in ensuring the safety of your dog as well as the protection of your property. By moving items that your dog could potentially harm himself with, or even destroy, you’re well on your way to safeguarding your home.  This includes loose cables from phone and laptop chargers, important documents, children’s toys, and even food if it’s in a low enough spot for your puppy to find and possibly eat. A good rule of thumb should be: if your puppy can reach it and you don’t want it tampered with, then find a safe place to keep it while he is adjusting to his new surroundings. Obtain Necessary Supplies Before you can bring your puppy into your home, there are several essential items you need in order to provide the puppy with everything it needs to be happy, healthy, and safe. Items on the top of your list should include: Dog food that is appropriate for the size and breed of your puppy Food and drink bowls Treats A crate, pen, or doggy gate depending on how you decide to housetrain Collar and harness Leash Chew toys Waste bags Potty pads Stain remover Nail clippers Brush Shampoo Being prepared with all of the tools you need to train and raise your puppy is the first step in being a successful dog owner. Once you get home with your puppy and your supplies, it’s truly time to start raising your dog. Prepare for Frequent Potty Breaks There are two important things you need to know about puppies and how they go potty early on. First, their bladders are extremely small and can’t hold their bowel movements for more than an hour or two at the most. Second, they don’t understand that going to the bathroom in the house is bad. To them, if they have to go, they will try to find the best place to go, even if that’s in your living room. That’s why it’s crucial that you take them outside every hour or so to give them a chance to go potty. This not only prevents them from having accidents in your home, but also reinforces that the appropriate place to go potty is outside. When your puppy inevitably has an accident in your home, the best way to respond is by not scolding or punishing them but by swiftly taking them to their chosen spot. Reprimanding your dog for having an accident will only make them go potty in more discrete places in the house, only worsening matters.  During the times when you do take them out, use a phrase like “go potty” and after they finish going, give them plenty of praise so they form a positive association with going potty outside. Keep Your Puppy Active A puppy that is engaged in play and other activities that stimulate their brain is a puppy that will adapt well to being a part of your family. An active puppy will not find themselves getting into trouble because you are the one providing the entertainment, preventing them from finding other, more destructive means of entertaining themselves. It’s also healthy for your dog to be running around, playing tug of war, and interacting playfully with their owners and especially other pups. They are forming strong bonds with their companions and getting the necessary exercise they need. This is a great time to show them toys that are appropriate to chew on and play brain-stimulating games. Crate Training It’s up to you whether you want to crate-train your new puppy. There are other ways to go about housetraining, but crate training is one of the most popular - and successful. It is an effective tool to use while you teach your dog about house rules while providing boundaries until they are allowed free reign throughout the house.  The crate is not to be used as a punishment for misbehavior, but, if implemented correctly through this type of training, it will become a safe space that your puppy can go to while it is becoming familiar with its new environment. The First Night You might have a hard time sleeping on your first night with your puppy. They will likely wake up several times throughout the night and engage in whining behavior because they find themselves alone.  It is completely normal and natural for a puppy to cry through the first few nights, and even after a few weeks. They are trying to fall asleep in a place they don’t feel totally safe yet, and they are adapting to a wholly new social dynamic. Playing with your puppy in the last hour or so before bedtime is a good way to get them nice and tired so that they fall asleep much easier. You also want to take them outside and give them a chance to go potty before bed so their bladder is totally empty. Introducing Other Pets You might want to wait until later on in the first two days to give your new puppy an introduction to your other pet(s), but it is an important and necessary step in making your puppy feel safe in your home. Keep the first several interactions brief and make sure you don’t leave them unattended. You can’t be certain how your other cat or dog will react to a new pet in the house so it’s a good idea to supervise them so you can intervene if things go south. Ready to bring home your new puppy? Find one on Lancaster Puppies today! See Available Puppies Here

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May 06, 2020

Chocolate and Beyond: 10 Foods Dogs Shouldn't Eat

We love our dogs, and sometimes it’s hard to resist giving them a scrap of our dinner after they give us big, cute begging eyes. However, there are a lot of foods we eat that dogs simply can’t.  Many people feed dogs human food like cooked eggs and lean meat that are high in protein, which can actually be quite good for dogs to eat, but some food that is healthy for humans can be toxic for dogs. Take a look at some well-known, and some not-as-well-known, foods that are toxic to dogs. Chocolate Starting off with the most notoriously toxic foods, we’ll take a look at chocolate. Dogs can’t efficiently break down one of the key naturally occurring substances found in chocolate: methylxanthines.  Dogs are far more sensitive to methylxanthines than humans, making it more difficult for them to digest. If a small amount of chocolate is consumed, depending on the size of the dog, they might suffer from vomiting and diarrhea. As they consume more, the worse the effects become. Seizures and even death can occur if a dog eats too much chocolate. Macadamia Nuts It isn’t entirely clear why macadamia nuts are toxic to dogs. While macadamia nut poisoning in dogs doesn’t typically require a trip to the vet, your pup will likely suffer from ataxia (loss of coordination), muscle weakness, and vomiting. If symptoms worsen, do not hesitate to contact your vet about possible treatment options. Garlic Garlic is one of the worst culprits and should be handled with care in homes with dogs. Belonging to the Allium family, garlic is poisonous to dogs because it contains thiosulfate, which kills dogs’ red blood cells. Along with chives and onions, garlic consumption can lead to anemia. Symptoms include lethargy, rapid breathing, and vomiting. Grapes and Raisins Grapes and raisins are toxic to dogs as well, with the underlying reason for this still unknown. Be very cautious with grapes and raisins around your dog, because they can be fatal. Even in small doses, grapes are dangerous for dogs to eat. Early symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration. Rapid kidney failure potentially leading to death is the most serious side effect. Milk While milk isn’t the most toxic of food for your dog to consume, it is not recommended beyond small doses. It truly depends on your dog, because many are actually lactose-intolerant. Drinking too much milk can potentially lead to your dog producing loose stools and being gassier than usual. As a small treat, milk is relatively harmless, but make sure to limit their consumption in order to avoid disrupting their digestion. Lemons Lemons and dogs do not mix at all. Not only do dogs not enjoy lemons and limes to begin with due to their citrusy and sour flavor, but they also contain psoralen, a substance that can cause gastrointestinal issues if ingested. Your dog likely won’t be tempted by a lemon, but in the event that they do decide to try one, monitor their symptoms and make sure they don’t get their paws on any more. Avocados Avocados are another fruit that dogs should avoid. While persin is a toxin found in avocados and is dangerous to many animals, dogs are fairly resistant to it. In large quantities, however, persin could have some adverse effects like vomiting and diarrhea.  Additionally, avocados are high in fat which can be a health concern if a dog ingests too much of it. Depending on the number of avocados your dog has eaten, pancreatitis can occur.  Caffeine Whether coming from tea, coffee, or any other caffeinated beverage, dogs ingesting caffeine is a major health concern. Dogs are much more sensitive to caffeine, and even a small amount of it can prove dangerous to dogs. Side effects include elevated heart rate, hyperactivity, and even seizures. If seizures are a result of caffeine ingestion, get your dog to a vet immediately; seizures suggest a high volume of caffeine ingestion which can lead to death. Alcohol Dogs do not respond well to alcohol. Similar to caffeine, it doesn’t take much to cause painful side effects. A dog that consumes even a negligible amount of alcohol will not only become intoxicated and lose coordination but could also slip into a coma and die. This goes for anything that has alcohol in it, not just beverages. Keep mouthwash and hand sanitizer far away from your pup if they seem tempted to try it. Xylitol Xylitol is a sugar substitute found in chewing gum and candy and it should never be ingested by dogs. It is extremely toxic to dogs and can result in some unpleasant side effects. When xylitol is ingested by a dog, it causes a drop in blood sugar levels - which can ultimately lead to seizures and even death. Dogs have a natural curiosity when it comes to human food, and sometimes it’s hard to resist giving them a taste, but it’s important to be wary of what food they get their paws on because they aren’t all safe for dogs to eat. Keep your furry friends safe by avoiding giving them or making accessible foods that are harmful to them.  See Puppies For Sale Here!

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Mar 27, 2020

Hounds With a History: Earliest Dog Breeds

Dogs have been around for tens of thousands of years and have served humans in a variety of ways. From hunting and tracking to lounging on the couch, some of the breeds we’ve come to know and love existed long before even our oldest ancestors. Here are some of the oldest breeds that still exist today. Basenji Considered the oldest dog breed, the Basenji is believed to have originated in Africa where images of dogs that resemble the Basenji can be seen in drawings as far back as 6000 BC. They were mostly used for hunting and tracking. Basenji are known for not being able to bark, but rather producing a high-pitched yowl. Some theorize that their mostly quiet nature is a result of needing to be silent on hunts. Afghan Hound The Afghan Hound is an ancient dog breed whose earliest origins are difficult to pinpoint. While some believe Afghan Hounds predate Christianity, this fact hasn’t been scientifically proven. What can be said, however, is that modern Afghan Hounds first appeared in the 1920s in the United Kingdom via Afghanistan and India. Afghan Hounds are a beautiful and majestic breed, which makes them appealing to would-be dog owners, but they are also extremely independent and don’t crave attention like other breeds. Alaskan Malamute While many ancient dogs were bred to hunt alongside their human companions, the Alaskan Malamute is estimated to have originated at least 4000 years ago, raised by the Mahlemut tribe as sled dogs as they migrated East from Siberia into Alaska. Malamutes make great family dogs due to their outgoing personality and pack mentality. However, be aware that relegating Malamutes behind fences and in your yard is a recipe for disaster, as they love to roam and dig. That said, they require lots of space to satisfy their high energy levels. Shiba Inu Dating back as far as 300 BC, Shiba Inus were used as hunting dogs in early Japan. Remaining exclusive to Japan for almost their entire existence, Shiba Inus were only recently brought over to the United States. In 1954, a military family brought a Shiba Inu home from Japan, and the first litter of Shiba Inus appeared in 1979. However, it wasn’t until 1993 that the breed was recognized by The American Kennel Club. Recognizable by their round face, Shibas are the most popular dog in Japan, and for good reason. They are cat-like in their self-hygiene and independence, but also loyal and protective of their human family. Chow Chow This ancient breed hails from China and has origins as far back as 3000 years ago in Arctic Asia. Like most ancient breeds, the Chow Chow was used to either hunt game or act as a guard dog. Chow Chows didn’t make their way West until the early 1800s when they arrived in England. From that point forward, Chow Chows became popular among aristocrats and, most notable of them all, Queen Victoria. It wasn’t until the late 20th century that the Chow Chow gained popularity in the United States. The Chow is a loyal companion but requires training and socialization in order to prevent aggression toward other dogs and small children. If you are interested in one of these historic breeds, find one on Lancaster Puppies today! Browse Puppies For Sale

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Mar 10, 2020

The Evolution of Dogs: From Wolf to Man’s Best Friend

The origin story that explains how dogs became our loveable, domesticated pets is one that is still heavily debated in the science community. While it is understood that dogs came from wolves, there is not a clear answer as to what major events occurred in the past that ultimately led to the domestication of dogs. However, there are several credible theories out there that could help explain their evolution. Take a look at some information below on how dogs evolved into man’s best friend. The Gray Wolf It is widely accepted that dogs, as we know them today, descended from a single common ancestor: a long-extinct species of wolves. Today, the gray wolf is the dog’s closest living relative. While they are closely related, they are physically quite different. It is easy to see the similarities in body shape and structure between domesticated dogs and wild wolves, but wolves are generally much larger in every way. Their paws are longer and paws bigger, and their nose protrudes more.  These attributes are all results of wolves needing to be bigger, stronger, and sleeker than their domesticated relatives. Wolves developed a much more streamlined gait that aids them in hunting, and they have stronger teeth for the raw meat that they consume from their prey. In pretty much every single way aside from surface-level physical appearance, dogs and wolves are very different. Domestication in the Past A recent study suggests that the domestication of dogs is likely to have occurred on two separate occasions, at two different times, in two different parts of the world, and with two different populations of wolves. This is a topic that has been a source of great debate, but only recently are credible theories providing us with possible answers as to when and where domestication happened.  One theory suggests that these two domestication events occurred in Eastern Eurasia (modern-day Asia) 12,500 years ago and in Western Eurasia (modern-day Europe) approximately 15,000 years ago. The European dogs were then displaced when domesticated Asian dogs were brought over to Europe by humans about 6,400 years ago.  The Eastern Eurasia domestication event proved to be the dominant event of the two because those domesticated dogs ended up taking the place of Western Eurasian dogs. This is also the reason why, for many years, a lot of people thought there was only one domestication event. Fossil records exist that show burials of humans that were deliberately buried next to dogs dating back 14,000 years. Studying their diets revealed one similar to that of the humans at that time, which strongly suggests that the humans fed the dogs. It is not certain what role dogs played in the everyday life of humans. It is possible they helped with hunting or cattle herding, but nothing has been concretely proven. The Domestication Process There are several theories as to how wolves became domestic. One suggests that humans domesticated young wolf pups before they could associate with their mother, thus allowing them to bond with humans first. However, that theory is not as widely supported as one that implies a “survival of the friendliest” type of natural selection. Evidence of this transition can be seen in how the dog’s physical features diverged from that of the wolf over time. Floppy ears and distinct, colorful coats, are indicators of what scientists describe as self-domestication. Humans did not have a role in domesticating dogs, despite what outdated theories and pop culture lead you to believe.  While wolves are predominantly not friendly toward humans, a variation on a molecular level is likely to have caused some wolves to be less aggressive. These wolves are the ones that would gradually become the dogs we know today. Dogs Becoming Pets The fact that dogs vary so much from breed to breed is something that can’t be said about most animals that are directly linked to their domestication tens of thousands of years ago. The wide variety of locations and climates that dogs became domestic in led them to develop physically in so many different ways. Long coats, short legs, and big ears are all results of the environment that early domestic dogs lived in. Another fascinating aspect of dogs’ domestication is how they evolved behaviorally. Being so closely bonded to humans caused them to be, in many ways, in sync with human expressions and emotions.  In fact, it is believed that dogs and humans advanced simultaneously on both a physical and behavioral level, which may have had an impact on the strong bond between the two. For instance, studies suggest that both humans and dogs underwent similar genetic changes in terms of digestion and metabolism.  Additionally, scientists discovered a correlation between the development of several brain processes in both humans and dogs. For example, similarities were found in the genes that affect the processing of serotonin. Interestingly, this could explain why dogs can be helped with antidepressants, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Studies have observed just how strong and unique a dog/human bond is when observing the chemical makeup of a dog's brain when reacting to the loving gaze of a human. They secrete the same hormone that a human mother and child would in a similar situation. Dogs are proven to show trust toward humans, something that is very rare between species. In another study where wolves and dogs were tasked with solving a problem, wolves would use trial and error, but dogs would almost immediately seek help from the humans conducting the study. Placing wolves and dogs in similar situations helps us better understand how dogs evolved to become human companions. While the evolution and domestication of dogs is still heavily debated, nothing changes the fact that the bond between dogs and their human companions is unlike any other. If you’re searching for your newest furry friend, browse dogs for sale on Lancaster Puppies today! See Available Puppies Here

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Feb 18, 2020

A Guide to Non-Shedding Dogs

If you dream of falling in love with your own companion dog but worry about allergens and picking dog hair off your clothes? You’ve come to the right place. When selecting the right dog for your lifestyle, there’s a bit more to investigate than a list of breeds that don’t shed. Here are some key things to keep in mind during your search for the right breed for you. Fur Growth in Dogs Dog fur and human hair are similar. You may have noticed, though, that some dog’s fur stops growing at a certain length whereas your own hair needs to be cut regularly. A dog’s fur growth can be categorized as either short-cycle or long-cycle. Short-Cycle Growth Dogs with this type of fur shed year-round, along with a possible seasonal shedding. Unlike human hair, this type of fur has a specified length where it stops growing and sheds, allowing a new strand to replace it. Some dogs even grow an additional coat during cold months that are later shed as the weather warms in the spring. Long-Cycle Growth Dogs with a long-cycle growth coat have fur that’s more like human hair. It grows continuously and needs to be clipped or trimmed regularly. These dogs still shed, but not as often as short-cycle furs. Non-shedding dogs fall into this category. Due to retaining their fur longer, the dog needs to be trimmed or shaved several times during the year.  Grooming Non-Shedding Dogs Regular brushing and bathing will reduce shedding in all dogs, no matter their coat type. That said, there’s no dog breed that doesn’t need some sort of grooming. Even low and non-shedding dogs require regular bathing, brushing, and trimming. Letting a dog’s fur get too long can result in matting and tangled fur.  If you are searching for a non-shedding dog for allergy reasons, it’s probably in your best interest to hire someone to groom your dog. Grooming the dog yourself exposes you to dander, which is the primary cause of dog allergies. Even a small amount of dander can result in a potential allergy attack. 12 No-Shed Dog Breeds If you’re looking for a dog that sheds very little, take a look at the list below. While no breed is 100% hypoallergenic, the following are more suitable for allergy sufferers. Small Breeds Grooming Frequency Coat Type Trim Frequency Bichon Frise High Double, Short & Long 1-2 months Cairn Terrier Medium Double, Wire 2-3 months Chinese Crested Dog Very Low Hairless Never West Highland White Terrier Very High Double, Short & Long Weekly Medium Breeds Grooming Frequency Coat Type Trim Frequency Basenji Very Low Smooth, Short Never Schnauzer Medium Double, Wire 2-3 months Tibetan Terrier Very High Double, Short & Long Weekly Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier High Soft, Thick Hair 1-2 months Large Breeds Grooming Frequency Coat Type Trim Frequency Airedale Terrier Medium Double, Wire 2 months Irish Water Spaniel Low Double, Curly 2 months Saluki Low Smooth or Feathered Never Standard Poodle High Thick, Curly 3-6 weeks Choosing a Non-Shedding Dog Before adopting your pup, it’s a good idea to research the fur types of dogs you are most interested in. Keep in mind that some coat types can be difficult to maintain without the assistance of a professional dog groomer. If your dream dog requires regular visits for clipping, stripping, or trimming, don’t forget to include those costs in your budget. While many owners opt for non-shedding dogs due to allergies or easier house cleaning, these dogs are not technically “hypoallergenic.” This is because most people with dog allergies react to canine dander and saliva, not fur. All dogs, even hairless ones, produce dander, so keep this in mind when choosing your breed. If you’re someone who’s allergic to dogs but looking to adopt one, try spending time with your breed of choice before adoption. If possible, visit a breeder’s home or foster a dog within that breed to see how you react. This will act as a “trial run” and allow you to determine whether or not your allergies can tolerate that breed. A Note on Hypoallergenic Dogs The term “hypoallergenic dog” first surfaced in the late 20th century, and few studies have determined whether any single dog breed produces fewer allergens than another. In fact, all dog breeds release a similar amount of allergens into the home environment. No dog breed has been found to be completely hypoallergenic.  Unfortunately, no dog is 100% shed-free, and you won’t find a breed that does not require regular grooming. Even low and non-shedding dogs often require a significant amount of grooming. So, if you are looking for a low-maintenance dog, read carefully about each breed to see if grooming time will be affected. Ready to adopt your non-shedding dog? Find one on Lancaster Puppies today! See Puppies For Sale

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Jan 29, 2020

Great Danes: The Big, Friendly Giants

Appreciated for its powerful build, bold character, and athletic endurance, the Great Dane has changed names many times since first appearing in the history books. Their cohabitation and usefulness to humans have remained constant over time. Once a reliable hunting and working dog, today the Great Dane is appreciated for its gentle loving nature and loyalty to family. Great Dane History Throughout history, they’ve also been called German Mastiff, German Boarhound, English Dogge, Ulmer Dogge, and Deutsche Dogge. Also nicknamed "The Apollo of Dogs" for its athletic and elegant stature. Dogs resembling the Great Dane have appeared in archeological relics dating back thousands of years. Illustrations and monuments in Egypt depicting dogs similar in appearance to the Great Dane appeared as early as 3,000 BC. In the 13th and 14th centuries, frescoes depicting the Great Dane were constructed in Tiryns, Greece. Other historic artifacts show the Great Dane present 2,000 years ago and belonging to an Asian tribe called Assyrians. Modern accounts indicate the breed now known as the Great Dane descended from a Mastiff-like breed in England during the 1500s. At this point in their ancestry, Danes were shorter, heavier, stockier, and more muscular. First known as aggressive fighters used to hunt wild boar and large game, these dogs were capable of hunting and capturing wild animals. Great Danes were disciplined enough to 'hold' an animal until hunters arrived. Due to their hunting skills, the breed was referred to as a “Boarhound”. Other work tasks Great Danes were useful for included carting, tracking, and watchdog duties. Owners in Austria and Germany first showed interest in breeding and cultivating the skills of the Boarhound also called “Englischer Hund”, “Englische Docke”, or “Englische Tocke” which were a cross-breed between the English Mastiff and Irish Wolfhound. The Great Dane has always been considered a luxury dog known to share the sleeping quarters with their royal owners.  By 1863, Great Danes made their first appearance in the show ring. Germans wanted to market the breed as a luxury pet instead of a working dog. So, names such as “German Dogge” and “German Mastiff” were used. Then, due to political tensions between Germany and the surrounding countries, the name Great Dane was introduced by non-German breeders.  Germany declared the Great Dane the national dog in 1876, where the breed was referred to as Deutsche Dogge. In the 1894 English Stud Book, the breed's name was officially changed to Great Dane. Within the next 20 years, the breed migrated to other countries. The American Kennel Club officially recognized the Great Dane in 1887. Since Great Danes had a reputation for extreme aggression, breeders began focusing on improving the breed's disposition. By 1889, an American club was formed which would later become the Great Dane Club of America. The first Great Dane recorded in the United States was named Prince and owned by Francis Butler of New York.  Great Dane Features Majestic and muscular, Great Danes are one of the tallest and largest dog breeds, yet still graceful in appearance and movement - and they have massive paws.  The average litter size is 6-10 puppies and at birth, they are so large (1-2 lbs), that a C-section is sometimes performed.  A Great Dane’s ratio between physical height and length is square. Their heads are rectangular and long and their broad noses are black, blue-black (Blue Dane), or spotted (harlequin). The cheeks are not prominent. Great Danes have broad chests with deep muscles. Their tails are long and tapered with short thick glossy coats.  Colors & Patterns The Great Dane is a beautiful dog with many interesting color patterns accepted by purebred organizations. These descriptions are for show dog consideration. Brindle — A yellow-gold base color with black chevron-patterned stripes. Fawn — A deep yellow-gold with a black mask, eyebrows, and sometimes the tips of the ears and tail.  Blue — A steel blue. Black — A solid glossy black coat.  Harlequin — A white base coat with irregular black "torn" patches distributed across the entire body with a white neck. Small gray or white patches are sometimes seen scattered among the black patches.  Mantle — A black and white coat with a solid black "blanket" over the body. The skull is black with a white muzzle.  Developmental Stages Great Danes weigh between 1-2 pounds at birth and grow quickly. By 4 weeks, a puppy will weigh between 5-8 lbs. Due to its large size, a Great Dane’s lifespan is one of the shortest at an average of 7.5–10 years.  Great Dane Puppy Age To the Withers Weight 2 months 13-18" 18-26 lbs 4 months 21-26" 45-65 lbs 6 months 26-33" 70-105 lbs 8 months 27-35" 80-120 lbs 1 year 29-36" 90-140 lbs   Adult Great Dane   To the Withers Weight Male 30" or more 120-200 lbs Female 28" or more 100-130 lbs Ear Cropping Due to ear injuries from boar hunting, Great Dane owners commonly removed the ear flaps (pinnae or auricles) of puppies 7-12 weeks old by surgically trimming the ear leathers and training the ears to stand upright. Ear cropping no longer serves a practical purpose beyond aesthetics. In 1895, ear cropping was banned in the United Kingdom, however, the procedure is still performed by some breeders in the US today.   Temperament Friendly, trustworthy, and loyal, Great Danes are dependable working dogs. They are spirited, courageous, dependable, never timid, nor aggressive. Described as "gentle giants," Great Danes are calm and loving with a mild temperament which makes them excellent family dogs.  Their strong attachment to a family or owner makes meeting strangers challenging at times. Great Danes require time to warm up to people they don't know. Their bark is powerful and intimidating, and they will defend themselves and their family if needed. Daily Care of the Great Dane Despite its hunting background, Great Danes only need moderate exercise. They require about the same amount of daily exercise as a medium-sized house dog. A long daily walk or a brief run in a field or park will suffice as Danes need to stretch their legs every day.  They do need space to maneuver around the home, so small apartments won't be the best for this dog. The Dane’s powerful tail is known to strongly whack objects. It can move with such force as to cause Splitting Tail or Kennel Tail, a wound occurring by breaking open or lacerating the dog's tail.  Feeding Great Danes require a high-quality diet. Their food needs moisture as dry-only results in poor stool quality. Due to certain health conditions, encouraging slow eating is important to a Great Dane’s health. Grooming Great Danes are high shedders, yet their short coat is easy to maintain with brushing. Easily cold, Great Danes benefit from a coat or sweater in the winter season. Keep in mind, they also have a tendency to drool.  Training Great Dane puppies grow quickly. They aren't small for long. By the time a puppy has left the litter, it will be larger than some full-grown small breeds. Even though the pup appears larger, it's still young and vulnerable. It will exhibit typical puppy behavior despite its size! Exercise should be moderate while a Great Dane puppy is developing its bones and muscles. They are suitable family dogs, however, Danes need early socialization so they do not react negatively to new environments and strangers. Despite their gentle nature, Danes do not hesitate to guard and protect their family.  Health Concerns Unfortunately, larger dogs generally don’t live as long as smaller dogs. A Dane’s lifespan is compounded by common health issues; which can include congenital heart disease and cancer (lymphoma and bone).  Genetic testing is common among Great Dane Breeders who try to keep the gene pool as healthy as they can. Ask the breeder what type of tests were performed on the parents and puppy to be prepared for future medical needs. Below is a list of common conditions seen in the Great Dane. Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) is prevalent in 35.6% of Great Danes. DCM is a common heart muscle defect that eventually causes heart failure. The heart muscle loses its ability to pump blood over time. Signs of DCM include coughing, weakness, depression, disinterest in food and exercise, and increased heart rate. Screening for this disease will advise the vet on ways to treat the dog.  Wobbler Syndrome. Appearing between 3-5 months of age, this is caused by compression on the spinal cord, leading to neck pain and neurological signs. With this condition, the dog cannot support their rear end and has an uneven gait. Surgery is possible for this condition, depending on the location of the compression. Gastric Dilatation-Volvulus (GDV) or Gastric Torsion is a preventable but very uncomfortable occurrence in large and deep-chested breeds. It is caused by the release of stomach gas from undigested food leading to a twisted stomach, cutting off the blood supply, and preventing food from passing through. Emergency surgery is required. With care and supervision, Great Danes can live healthy, full lives. They’re lovable and loyal companions that will cherish their time with you. Take a look at our Great Danes, and see if these giant pups are right for you! Great Dane Puppies For Sale

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Jan 20, 2020

How to Crate Train a Puppy

Crate training is a necessary part of the housetraining process for dogs. When puppies are first introduced to their new home, the rules will not be totally clear to them. Leaving them out to their own devices isn’t the best option. They may chew up furniture, go potty where they aren’t supposed to, and be generally rambunctious with unsuspecting guests. These are all habits that crate training aims to eliminate. You must housetrain early because certain habits are hard for puppies to break as they get older. This is a process that takes time and requires a lot of patience. Ultimately, it’s very rewarding and a crucial step toward making your puppy a disciplined and happy member of your home. Before we go further, it is important to note that crating your puppy is never to be used as punishment. If their crate is seen as a place to go when they are bad, then they will be far less likely to go there when you need them to. Because dogs have a denning instinct, crates are a perfect place for dogs to have as their own while they get used to living in their new environment. Step 1: Choose a Crate The main factor to consider when choosing a crate for your puppy is the size, both of your dog and the crate. Your puppy’s crate needs to be large enough for them to be comfortable now and with future growth. This is important because it will be a place where they spend extended periods. To ensure maximum comfort, include bedding and a toy. Step 2: Choose a Location For the Crate Potentially easy to overlook, where you set up their crate can have a great impact on your puppy's attitude towards it. The crate shouldn’t be near a heater that would cause your pup to overheat, but it should be in a place that gets plenty of natural light, so they can happily bask in the sunlight. It should be your top priority to make your puppy as comfortable as possible in their crate so that they can make positive associations early on and set you up for success as you continue crate training. Step 3: Familiarize Your Pup With the Crate At first, your puppy might not gravitate towards the crate because they don’t feel safe there, so it’s important to slowly entice them to go in, but never force them. Placing a treat in the crate to get them to enter is a good tactic, and should be rewarded with light praise. Let your puppy willingly enter the crate several times, giving them treats for doing so; once they are comfortable doing that, gently close the door when they are inside and leave them there for a minute or two. Repeat this process a few more times until they appear calm with the closed door. Step 4: Feed Your Pup in the Crate After they are more familiar with the crate, the next step is to get them comfortable with eating inside it. Doing so leads to prolonged time in the crate, gradually getting them more comfortable with the space. Instead of putting a treat inside the crate, place their bowl of food. If they are at all hesitant to go inside, move the food near the gate and slowly move it back until they are fully in the cage. Keeping them engaged in an activity like eating a meal will allow them to spend a longer time in their crate while occupied. If they begin to whine or howl after finishing their food, remain firm with them to not encourage or ignore the behavior and allow it to continue. This might be a difficult step for your dog, so do not get discouraged if they don’t immediately take to being in their crate a bit longer than before. Be patient with your pup, and try to give gentle positive reinforcement when you can. Step 5: Increase the Duration Now that you have your puppy eating full bowls of food in their crate with no issues, it’s time to take further steps to increase the duration that your puppy is in the crate. Your goal with this part of the training is to leave your puppy in the crate for longer and longer increments without them growing anxious. You want to keep repeating the process; give them a treat for entering the crate, and leave them alone in the crate longer and longer until they are completely alone for 30 minutes. Now that your puppy has reached this level of comfort, you start leaving them alone when you run out on short trips. Step 6: Crate Your Puppy While You’re Away With a longer period inside the crate established without any signs of anxiety, you can feel free to leave them for a more extended period while you are not home. The dog mustn’t begin to equate the crate with being alone, so for this to not become the case, have your dog enter the crate at varied times before you leave. Do it five minutes before you leave one time, then ten minutes the next, and so on up to twenty minutes at the most. You can leave for up to two hours at a time without upsetting your puppy and they should be rewarded with praise when you return. Remember, the length of time should be based on your pup’s bladder capacity, to make sure they don’t have an accident while in the crate. Step 7: Crate Your Puppy Overnight You’ve made it this far, and now it’s time to take one last step toward fully housetraining your puppy. If they can feel comfortable sleeping through the night in their crate, then they are going to adjust well to living in your home. While crating overnight, it is a good rule of thumb to bring the crate into your bedroom so that they can alert you when they need to go potty. You can then start to move the crate to a different location as your puppy gets more comfortable spending the night in their crate. Continue to reward them with treats and praise for entering the crate so that positive associations are still formed even at a different time and in a new setting. Crate training isn't always easy, but this should not discourage passionate dog owners who want to make sure their dog is well-adjusted and happy in their home. Not every dog will go through crate training at the same pace, so there is no need to get discouraged if your puppy doesn’t immediately take to their crate. It will be incredibly rewarding in the end to have a fully housetrained dog that is happy and comfortable living in your home. Show Me the Puppies!

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Dec 27, 2019

Choosing a Dog for Your Apartment

There are several factors to consider when looking for a dog for your apartment. Not all dogs are cut out for apartment life, and it’s crucial that you don’t end up choosing a dog that isn’t well-adapted to living in a smaller apartment - especially when they need lots of room to run around, or don’t always like sharing smaller spaces with other dogs or people. Consider the Dog’s Size While generally speaking, a small dog is a better fit for a smaller living space, not all small dogs are suited for apartment life. Just because a dog is small, does not mean it will be quiet, and it certainly does not mean it will be content to roam around a small area for the duration of a workday. On the other hand, just because a dog is large, doesn’t mean it will be ill-suited to live in an apartment. Some large dogs don’t require a large living space and will have an easy time adjusting to apartment life. Consider Sound Levels Dogs that are frequent or strong barkers can be a challenge in apartments due to the close proximity of neighbors. It’s not always easy to train a traditionally talkative dog into being less so - but with noise complaints, and sometimes even fines, certain pups just might not be cut out for apartment living. Keeping this into account, perhaps choosing a quieter breed would be a better option. At least while landlords and close neighbors are in the picture. Keep Temperament in Mind Going hand-in-hand with the amount of noise a dog makes on a daily basis, a dog’s temperament is something to be conscious of when living in an apartment. While going to and from your apartment with your dog, you will undoubtedly be in situations where your furry friend will be in the same hallway or elevator as strangers. None of your neighbors will have anything to complain about if your dog is friendly and well-mannered. However, if your pup is too friendly, or too curious, and jumps or otherwise seeks attention when people aren’t expecting it, there could be some tension. These are easily trainable with certain techniques, but if certain breeds are just less rambunctious than others, it might be a simpler option. Be Conscious of Their Energy Level All dogs enjoy their fair share of playtime, but high-energy dogs that require large spaces to run around even while indoors will likely have a hard time adjusting to apartment life. Having a yard is not a luxury most people who live in apartments have, so finding a dog that is low-energy might be ideal for someone living in a smaller space. While it is entirely possible to have a high-energy dog in an apartment, there is a lot more work that has to be done in order for them to be totally satisfied.  Don’t Forget About Potty Training If you are looking to bring a puppy into your apartment, potty training your dog is critical. It is important to keep in mind that taking your dog out to go potty is a potential hassle if you have to go down several flights of stairs or take an elevator ride just so your pup can relieve themselves. Making sure they are properly trained to wait until they are outside to do so might be a challenge for not only your puppy but also for you. Patience is key when working with a puppy, and although it might be difficult at first, you have to stay committed or they’ll form habits that will be hard to reverse as they grow up. If you are dedicated and willing to put in the time and effort, you will have your puppy fully trained and adjusted to living in an apartment. 4 Great Dogs for Your Apartment Shih Tzu With that being said, Shih Tzus are a great, small dog that was revered by the Chinese for more than a thousand years and bred to live and lounge in palaces. Not overly loud and not unfamiliar with being inside for extended periods of time, these adorable lap dogs will be more than happy to make your apartment their home. Bulldog Despite giving off the appearance of being tough, grumpy, and loud, the Bulldog is a great choice for those looking for a relatively lazy dog that is friendly, quiet, and doesn’t require tons of exercise to be happy. Bichon Frise Extremely charming and outgoing, the Bichon Frise fears no stranger and loves to explore. They will make friends with all of your neighbors, even including other dogs that live in your apartment building. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel One of the quietest breeds around, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel won’t disturb neighbors late at night with incessant barking. More than happy to snuggle up and watch TV on a rainy day, the Cavalier is docile by nature and loves to be affectionate. Ready to make your apartment a dog’s forever home? Check out our puppies today! Show Me the Puppies!

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Dec 24, 2019

A Guide to the Beabull Dog Breed

A cross between the floppy-eared Beagle and the stout Bulldog, Beabulls are a friendly, playful, and affectionate mix that shares the qualities of two popular breeds, making them excellent additions to families of any size due to their calm demeanors and loyalty. Keep reading to find out more about Beabulls. History Beabulls originated in the United States, although it is difficult to determine the exact time frame that the first mix appeared. As time goes on, they are becoming a more popular breed in the States. While the history of the Beabull is unclear, the origins of the Beagle, the Beabull’s first parent breed, can be traced back to medieval times. Beagles were used primarily for hunting and tracking down prey. The Beabull’s other parent breed, the Bulldog, was unfortunately used in a violent early 19th century English “sport” called bull-baiting. Today, they are docile, friendly, and loving.  Appearance The appearance of a Beabull is unpredictable; some share the physical features of a Beagle, while others have the small, full frame of a Bulldog. Regardless of which breed the mix favors, all Beabulls don the floppy ears of a Beagle and the short legs that are characteristic of both Beagles and Bulldogs. Beabulls’ coats tend to be relatively short, straight, and fairly thick. In terms of color, this mix can be white, brown, or even a brindle coat pattern, which is black or dark brown stripes on a lighter-colored base. A healthy weight for a Beabull is between 30 and 40 pounds, and they have an average height of 12-16 inches. Health Like many dogs, Beabulls can be susceptible to Hip Dysplasia - a skeletal disease in which the hip joints don’t develop properly. This makes walking, climbing stairs, or playing laborious activities. Beabulls are also prone to ear infections due to their long and droopy ears. Dogs with ear infections tend to bat at their ear and whine due to the pain. A discharge coming from the ear as well as debris-filled ear canals are strong indicators of an ear infection. Beabulls are also susceptible to Hypothyroidism, which is defined by a low-functioning thyroid and can be identified by weight gain, decreased activity, increased shedding, and hair loss.  While not all Beabulls will develop health conditions and should remain healthy given the proper attention and care, it is important to be aware of the physical symptoms of these health issues so that you can get your Beabull the proper care before symptoms worsen. Temperament  Beabulls are docile and get along great with just about all people. They are not easily bothered by rambunctious children, making them a great addition to families with younger kids. Beabulls are not shy of strangers either, but will always prefer their owners and crave their attention more than anyone else’s. While not overly active, Beabulls enjoy their fair share of playing and should receive about an hour of playtime a day. Training For the most part, Beabulls are easy to train. They respond best to treats and other reward-based training and need to be involved in engaging activities. It is possible that the stubbornness of the Bulldog can come out and make training a bit difficult. However, as long as you remain firm and reward good behavior, training should be a breeze, and your Beabull will be a proper and loving companion. As puppies, play-biting is something to look out for and important to correct before it turns into a habit. Best practices for curbing your Beabull’s playful yet strong bite include introducing toys for them to chew on so they learn appropriate objects for biting.  Grooming The Beabull’s coat sheds frequently, and it is recommended that grooming is done daily with a pin brush. It is also crucial that their ears are cleaned weekly, so as to prevent any build-up of debris. Beabulls should be bathed at least once a month, or anytime that they’re dirty. Overall, Beabulls are a charming mix that will love you and your family, no matter the size. If you are interested in adopting a Beabull of your own, you can find one on Lancaster Puppies today! Show Me the Beabulls!

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Dec 13, 2019

Things to Know Before Getting a Cavapoo

Bred to be a hypoallergenic companion dog, the Cavapoo is perfectly suited for families. With their rounded faces, large eyes, wide brows, and long ears hanging below the chin, Cavapoos are also categorized as crossbreed (hybrid) dogs. Known as a 'fuzzy-faced teddy bear,’ Cavapoos are a small designer dog recognized by the Designer Breed Registry (DBR) and approved by the International Designer Canine Registry (IDCR) since 2009. Cavapoos are also called Cavoodle, Cavapoodle, Cavadoo, and Cavadoodle.  History No one person can be credited with developing the Cavapoo. Cavapoos appeared in the early 1950s in both the United States and Australia. However, their recent explosion in popularity began in Australia during the late 1990s and has spread to the UK and the United States since.  Appearance Cavapoos are a product of selective breeding—the intentional mixing of two purebred dogs—the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and Poodle (either miniature or toy.) This leads to appearance variance due to crossbreeding. Additionally, since the Poodle parent can be either toy or miniature, the height of the Cavapoo will fall within two different ranges. The Cavapoo’s coat can be curly or feathered with the length ranging between medium and long. A curly coat is inherited from the Poodle parent and the straight coat is influenced by the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel parent. Cavapoo coloring includes solid chestnut, gold, black, white, tawny (apricot), Blenheim (chestnut and white), and Tricolor (black, white, and chestnut).  One huge benefit of the Cavapoo is hidden in its fur. They grow a no-to-low-shed coat. Plus, it usually retains hypoallergenic qualities inherited from the poodle parent. Cavapoo bodies are short and strong, their necks are elongated, and their tails are long. Cavapoos come in two general size ranges. Results are influenced by the poodle parent and if it is a toy (smaller) or miniature (taller) dog.  Toy Cavapoo Mini Cavapoo 11-13" tall* 13-18" tall* 12-18 lbs 18-25 lbs * A dog’s height is measured to the withers. The withers is the ridge between the shoulder blades of an animal. Health Cavapoos are active dogs because of their Spaniel parents and adults will need regular walks between 30 and 60 minutes a day. Owners won’t be overwhelmed by the Cavapoo’s energy level but should provide a healthy exercise and play schedule to maintain this energetic dog’s quality of life. A Cavapoo’s lifespan is between 13-15 years. A crossbreed’s diverse genetic makeup gives them ‘hybrid vigor’ and this positively influences their health and the length of their lives. However, a short muzzle means Cavapoos will be sensitive to heat.  Some Cavapoos are predisposed to weight gain as obesity is often diagnosed in the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. Consequently, some breeders prefer the miniature poodle parent to the toy poodles since they have fewer health-related issues.  Cavapoos can suffer from Luxating patella (a condition in which the patella, or kneecap, dislocates or moves out of its normal location), congenital heart defects, eye conditions, and hip dysplasia. However, it is possible to avoid issues like these using DNA testing - like Progressive Retinal Atrophy. Temperament Cavapoos endear all the qualities of a companion dog, described by owners and breeders as outgoing, playful, and gentle. Some say they are just as happy curling up next to you as they are running through the woods on a walk. Additionally, Cavapoos are suitable for apartment living if have daily exercise, and they are not prone to barking much. Cavapoos prefer humans over other dogs and can become attached to one owner. They are good with both elderly folks and kids. Although as puppies, they are very little - so small children will need supervision when spending time with their tiny pups at first. Cavapoos are sociable, needing a significant amount of attention and special treatment. If you are away frequently or for long periods of time, they may develop separation anxiety. Symptoms of separation anxiety may include: Urinating or defecating in the house Barking and howling Chewing or digging Escaping Pacing Training Cavapoos are highly trainable as they are intelligent and demonstrate an eagerness to please. They respond best to gentle guidance rather than strong discipline.  Begin early socialization and obedience training as pups. In the early months, the Cavapoo’s attention span is short and training may take 9-12 months to stick. However, most trainers feel they learn house rules and owner expectations quickly. Crate training works for Cavapoos as they want to toilet at a distance from where they sleep. However, don’t leave them secluded in the crate for long periods of time. As mentioned above, Cavapoos are highly sociable and desire a strong bond with the family. Grooming Cavapoo grooming is considered low to moderate maintenance. They love attention and the one-on-one time grooming provides will make them willing participants. Begin grooming Cavapoos early so they become accustomed to the comb, brush, and clippers so close to their face. Cavapoos have a luxurious coat that requires brushing several times a week to avoid knots. Remove twigs and yard debris which can tangle in the fur. Shedding is not a major issue. A Cavapoo’s fur needs to be clipped because it does not fall out. Groomers recommend clipping them 3-4 times a year.  A curly-coated Cavapoo (poodle influenced) will have less shedding than a straight-coated (Cavalier King Charles Spaniel) dog. However, curly fur tangles and knots easily. So, frequent brushing is necessary in order to avoid knots and matted fur. Trim their excess ear fur and thoroughly dry the ears after bathing to avoid infections. The Cavapoo brow fur may require trimming if it hangs over the eyes. If fur grows long under their legs, brush frequently to avoid knots. All in all, the Cavapoo makes a delightful, loyal companion, especially for families. Show Me the Cavapoos!

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Dec 03, 2019

How to Keep Your Pup Safe over Thanksgiving

The Thanksgiving weekend brings many new sights, sounds, and smells to your dog’s nose. If you are planning a dinner party and guests at your home, prepare ahead to make Thanksgiving a safe and positive experience for your young dog. With a change in the routine—introducing new people and sounds and heightened activity around your home—Thanksgiving can expose your puppy to a few dangerous moments. Additionally, a full house, louder sound levels, and excitable activities make your puppy vulnerable to emotional stress and fear. Organize Your Home Keep loud sounds to a minimum. Soft holiday music can set the tone and volume level in your home. Place a safety barrier between a fireplace and your puppy. The same consideration goes for lit candles which should be moved to a high place. When the oven doors open, make sure no person or pup is underfoot. Puppies are known to dart out open doors. If your pup isn't already microchipped, contact your vet about the benefits. If your pup does get out of the house, they're more likely to return when properly identified. Don’t set groceries on the floor or leave napkins dropped under the table for long. These items must stay out of your puppy's mouth. Secure the trash can by storing it in the garage, outside the back door, or inside a cabinet.  Trash, turkey bones, strings, plastic bags, and packaging are going to smell delicious to your puppy, and it's incredibly important you don't let them get into this potentially hazardous mix.  Keep in mind that some holiday plants can cause dogs harm. If one of your guests brings a gift plant this Thanksgiving, set it up on a table. Eating holly, ivy, mistletoe, Amaryllis, Poinsettia, or Christmas cactus will cause gastrointestinal upset.  Not all plants are poisonous, but your pup is likely to experience at least some sickness. This protection measure includes potpourri! If Thanksgiving weekend includes setting up the Christmas tree, this might be the year to have a table-top tree. At the very least, when decorating the tree, don't place lights, ornaments, or tinsel on the bottom layer of branches.  Additionally, secure the center truck to the wall so bump ups against the tree don't knock it over. Don't give your pup access to the tree water reserve either. Guests If you are currently training your puppy, the holidays offer a good opportunity to teach socialization. Exposing them to people of all ages, sizes, skin and hair colors, personalities, clothing, facial hair and gear (like glasses) is a lesson in how many wonderful people will enter their world.  Dogs who meet children during early socialization (Socialization with people should begin between 5-12 weeks) do not show aggressive behavior later in life and, in fact, have lower heart rates around kids than dogs with no exposure during this important time. Visitors to your home need to be introduced to your new puppy. At this moment, you will teach the pup how to meet new people and lay down the puppy rules with your guests. Young children who are not familiar with animal care could hurt or expose your pup to danger unintentionally. Keep a close eye on these interactions. For the times over the weekend when you are distracted, someone else needs to be in charge of your dog. Ask a guest with experience to take turns watching over your pup. When no one is available, a crate or dog bed should be ready to remove your pup from the crowd and give them the opportunity to rest. Feeding With all the great smells your dog will be experiencing this weekend, have a safe treat ready to distract the little guy. You will then have something to give them during meal times. Ask guests to refrain from feeding your puppy. The risk that they will ingest unsafe food is just too high.  Know the safe and toxic foods for dogs. You may set aside a few healthy foods like apples, cooked pumpkin, carrots, sweet potatoes, celery, corn off the cob, and just a little taste of Brussels sprouts. The most common Thanksgiving ingredients that you must not allow your puppy to get into is the fat scrapings (including gravy) and bones. Review the dangerous foods list below and remind guests to follow the rules and NOT feed your puppy. Bones Fat trimmings Onions, garlic, chives, and leeks Raisins Yeast dough Chocolate Xylitol (all desserts/sweets in general) Macadamia nuts Caffeinated drinks Alcohol Quiet Time A lot of families enjoy a walk in the woods or around the neighborhood after a big meal. This is a good activity to get your pup out of the house and into a quieter environment. You should hold the leash and continue the training lessons. Walk with your dog and watch for fatigue. Create a safe place in your home that’s away from noisy activities. Have prepared a quiet room where you can bring your pup for water and a nap. When your pup has been exposed to enough excitement, remove them from the crowd and give them a chance to rest. Signs of Fear or Stress There may be a moment when your puppy is not sure how to handle new people and sounds in your home. With a busy household full of unusual sounds, Thanksgiving Day will, at the very least, exhaust your puppy. But, it may also lead to a few fearful moments and stress. There are four types of fear responses to watch for—freeze, flight, fight, and erratic. Freeze is when the dog cowers and waits for an event to end. Flight makes a dog back up, turn away, or run. A fight response will appear as barking, growling, lunging, snapping, and biting. Erratic responses are several unconnected behaviors like scratching themselves and jumping up and down to displace stress. Be prepared to recognize these responses in your dog and move them to a safe and quiet location. Several of these signs together could indicate your puppy is under stress: Flattened ears, cowering, trembling, whining, or tucked tail Wet paw pads Turning away, avoiding, escaping, or pressing against you Licking lips or yawning Shaking off (as if they are wet but are not) Do your best to maintain your pet's daily schedule on Thanksgiving weekend. All of your doggy rules apply despite the holiday. Expect your pup to be exhausted at the end of each day and give them time to recover from the extra stimulation.

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Nov 13, 2019

Puppy Feeding Schedule: A Guide

Along with all the tools you’ve gathered to raise a healthy, happy dog, you are probably also thinking about the quality of your new puppy’s food. Safe and highly nutritious foods are essential to the long-term health and quality of life for your dog. This is especially true for puppies who grow quickly. Their diet during this developmental phase will greatly affect bone growth. It's important that they receive both a balanced diet and one that causes muscle gain and not fat. Fast growth and excessive fat can both contribute to the developmental orthopedic disease (DOD) commonly seen in large breed dogs like Great Danes. A healthy diet impacts hormone levels, which can affect your dog's behavior and contentment with appropriately sized meal portions. The food you feed your dog will provide energy for exercise and will influence your pup's quality of life for years to come. Meal portions should be according to package instructions or your vet's recommendation. The amount of food you feed at one meal is based on your dog’s metabolism and body type. It’s important to note that once you begin training with treats, you should reduce your puppy’s meal portions a bit. Age Breed Size Feedings Per Day Food Type 6-12 weeks Small 4 Dry Puppy 6-12 weeks Large 4 Dry Puppy 3-6 Months Small 3 Dry Puppy 3-6 Months Large 3 Dry Puppy 6-12 Months Small 2 Adult (after spaying/neutering) 6-12 Months Large 2 Adult (after spaying/neutering) 1 Year + Small 2 Adult 1 Year + Large 2 Adult Transition your dog between puppy and adult food slowly. Always avoid sudden changes to your dog's diet. Even with the healthiest foods, this disruption can lead to vomiting and diarrhea. Keep a food diary and slowly introduce new foods to your pup. If you see a change in digestion within the first day, your dog could have an intolerance to the new food. If you see a change in the dog's skin or coat, talk to your vet about the recently introduced food. It's possible your dog has an allergy. Aging Dogs A mature or senior dog is between the ages of 12-14 in smaller breeds and 7-9 years old in large and giant breeds. As your dog ages, their nutritional needs will change. Obesity, degenerative joint disease, cognitive dysfunction, cardiac, renal, liver, and metabolic diseases are commonly seen in older dogs. When you see your dog slow down, ask the vet how you can adapt their diet for a long, healthy life. The most common nutritional issues dogs face are bladder stones, weight gain, inflammatory disease, and dermatitis. All of these can be addressed through your vet who will adjust your dog’s diet, exercise, and medication. The good news is, you can positively influence your dog’s health through diet and exercise alone. Now that you are feeling the importance of providing your new dog with the right foods for a long healthy life, let's outline a plan that avoids dangerous pitfalls and enhances your dog's lifestyle. Obesity in Dogs Even before moving in with you, mealtime was a social activity for your puppy. It was an important time of the day to teach socialization. It’s no wonder that dogs want to hang out with humans at the dinner table. Begin by discussing your meal plan with your dog's veterinarian. Most pet owners feed their dogs a commercial dry kibble. These meals are considered nutritionally balanced and have contributed to longer, healthier pet lives. However, other studies conclude a dried kibble diet is a risk factor for obesity, which is now the most prevalent medical disease of companion animals. We know that it's important to measure the amount of kibble you feed your dog at mealtimes. Pet owners can sometimes be inconsistent, even when using the same measuring cup every day. Increasing or decreasing the meal portion can impact your dog's health. If the vet feels your dog is overweight by even one pound, reduce the measuring cup size by a third of a cup to see if your dog loses that extra weight. Or, consider replacing some of the kibble with specific fruits and vegetables. Dogs are considered obese when only 15% over their ideal body weight. You want your dog to have an excellent “health-related quality of life,” or HRQL, which measures their level of energetic/enthusiastic, happy/content, active/comfortable, calm/relaxed behaviors. Overweight and obese dogs are less energetic/enthusiastic and active/comfortable than dogs of a healthy weight. Not to mention total cholesterol and triglycerides are higher in obese dogs. There are three factors that will influence a healthy weight for your dog—genetics, whether your dog will have puppies, and human management, which is the diet and amount of exercise in your dog's daily routine. Before switching your dog to diet food, which unfortunately tends to fail, cut back a little bit on meal portions and increase exercise to a daily walk. Outside of dieting, there are a few simple rules you can follow to reduce weight gain in your dog. First, only one family member should feed the dog. In fact, as the number of people who live in the home increases, a dog’s weight increases too. Second, feed your dog two times a day. Do not let your pup graze! Try not to feed them every time they ask. Surprisingly, dogs who are fed once each day are also more likely to be overweight. It’s great for your pup if you exercise together in the evenings. Dinnertime meals also increase nighttime activity for your dog. For any aged dog, this provides after-meal energy to walk or exercise outside. More dogs who exercise daily outside the yard are of normal weight as opposed to once a week or only playing in the yard. If you do attempt a reduced-calorie diet, influence your dog's behavior by favoring healthier foods. One study found that dogs chose a smaller portion when their owner preferred it over a large portion. So, when introducing new, healthier foods to your dog it may help to pique their interest by "ooh-ing and ahh-ing" before placing the bowl of food down. Lastly, keep treats to a minimum. Food beyond meals greatly affects the weight of your dog. Beyond Kibble If you are feeding your dog an AAFCO (Association of American Feed Control Officials) approved dog food, adding fruit and vegetables to your dog’s diet is not necessary. But these foods are great for overweight dogs and also a way to incorporate low-calorie treats into your dog's diet. Interestingly, dogs prefer the smell of their food to be meat combined with other foods. Variety in the foods you serve keeps them interested in eating. When introducing new vegetables, steam or boil them to help break down the fiber and assist with digestion. Add little fruit and vegetables to your dog's diet in moderation. Fruit contains natural sugar, and fiber is present in many fruits and vegetables. Large portions may be difficult for your dog to digest and can lead to gastrointestinal distress. Wash fruits and vegetables, and remove pits and larger seeds you find in fruits like watermelon. Chop, grate, or puree vegetables and mix them into their meals. Remember fresh, not canned fruits and vegetables are best as they won't contain added salt and sugar. There’s incredible nutritional value to incorporating daily fruit or veggies into your dog’s diet. For example, if your dog suffers from any number of dermatosis conditions (skin rashes or parasitic infections), raw dark leafy vegetables like broccoli will assist a quick recovery (Therapeutic Management of Canine Demodicosis, Singh, 2011). Acceptable Foods Acceptable Treats Apple Banana Pumpkin (cooked) Blueberries Cantaloupe Cranberries Watermelon Pears Cucumbers Pineapple Oranges Raspberries Peaches (remove pit) Strawberries Carrots Broccoli Peas Green Beans Sweet Potato Spinach Celery Brussels Sprouts Zucchini   Corn (remove cob, unpopped)   Homemade Dog Food If you want to avoid commercial food, Lisa M. Freeman, DVM, Ph.D., professor at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University suggests a homemade diet designed by a nutritionist. With the right recipe and variety of foods, you'll ensure that your dog is receiving all the vitamins and minerals required for a shiny coat, healthy skin, clean teeth, and a high energy level. A homemade meal of combined raw and cooked foods can be more beneficial to the health of your dog than commercially processed foods. To first ensure you are covering all the nutritional bases, run the dog food recipe by your vet. Also, check your recipe to see if you are covering all the bases. It provides a comprehensive list of acceptable foods to feed your dog and what supplements (if any) they'll need. Foods You Should Never Feed to Your Dog It’s great if you want to supplement your dog’s diet with cooked meats and safe fruits or vegetables. However, never feed these foods to your dog: Bones Sugary foods and drinks Fat trimmings Xylitol (candy, gum, toothpaste) Avocado Salt Onion, garlic, chives, leeks Alcohol Cherries Caffeine (coffee, tea, energy drinks) Persimmons (fruits with pits) Chocolate Grapes, raisins Dairy (ice cream, milk) Tomatoes Raw eggs Asparagus Macadamia nuts Mushrooms Yeast dough Show Me the Puppies!

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Oct 07, 2019

French Bulldogs 101: Key Things to Know

Bat ears, a wrinkly face, a flat nose, and a playful disposition: these are just a few of the characteristics that make up the lovable, friendly French Bulldog. Over the past hundred years, Frenchies have been adored by many, making them one of the most popular dog breeds today.  Whether you’re a French Bulldog owner, considering adopting one, or just love the breed, keep reading for some background on the charming Frenchie. French Bulldog History Despite what its name may imply, the French Bulldog breed originated in England. Frenchies are descendants of English Bulldogs, who were used for bull-baiting. When activities like this were outlawed in England in 1835, the English Bulldog transitioned from a sporting breed to a companion breed.  To reduce their size, English Bulldogs were bred with smaller breeds, resulting in the Toy Bulldog. During the 1850s, Toy Bulldogs became increasingly popular in England and even started appearing in dog shows.  Meanwhile, during the height of the Industrial Revolution, lace workers from England began to relocate to Normandy, France. These workers brought a variety of dogs with them, and Toy Bulldogs were no exception.  The French adored the Toy Bulldogs, so English breeders began to send over more of the breed. By 1860, there weren’t many Toy Bulldogs left in England, but they were wildly popular in France.  Over time, the Toy Bulldog became a breed of its own and received its own name: the Bouledogue Francais, or French Bulldog in English. By the end of the 19th century, the French Bulldog’s popularity had spread from Europe to America, and Frenchies became adored by more and more people across the globe.  Characteristics of French Bulldogs Temperament The Frenchie’s affectionate, easygoing temperament is one of the most appealing features for many owners. Because they are so adaptable and friendly, French Bulldogs make great pets for first-time dog owners. They adjust well to other animals, and they are extremely kid-friendly.  On a scale of energy level, French Bulldogs fall somewhere in the middle. While they love to cuddle and sleep, they also enjoy playing and exercising. Frenchies also don’t bark much, making them great pets for apartment dwellers. French Bulldogs are extremely sociable and thrive on human interaction, so they shouldn’t be left alone for extended periods of time. As long as they receive the attention and care they need, French Bulldogs make wonderful, easy companions for all types of people. Health Like humans, all dogs have the potential to develop health problems at any point during their lives. However, certain breeds are more susceptible to some health conditions more than others. French Bulldogs, for example, are especially prone to brachycephalic syndrome because of their flat face and nose.  The Frenchie’s facial structure can cause their airways to be obstructed to varying degrees. Depending on the severity of the condition, Frenchies may or may not need treatment for brachycephalic syndrome. Another health condition that French Bulldogs are susceptible to is hip dysplasia: a condition in which the femur doesn’t fit properly into the pelvic socket, causing pain and discomfort in one or both of the dog’s rear legs. Keep in mind that hip dysplasia is often passed down from parents to their offspring. So, make sure that your Frenchie has been tested for hip dysplasia before you adopt him or her.  Appearance One of the first things you’ll notice about French Bulldogs is their unique bat-like ears. Frenchies’ ears sit high on their head and are broad at the base, with a round, more narrow top. Their bodies are short, round, and typically around 10 to 13 inches tall. On average, a healthy French Bulldog will weigh between 24 and 30 pounds.  French Bulldogs’ coats are very short, fine, and soft, meaning they’re easy to groom. Frenchies come in a variety of different colors, such as cream, fawn, white, and various shades of brindle (a coat with specks and streaks of different colored fur). Despite rumors circulating about the value of specific coat colors vs. others, no coat color is rarer or worth more money than another. Caring for a French Bulldog A Frenchie’s Ideal Home Frenchies are extremely adaptable and can adjust to many different home environments and lifestyles. Still, it’s important to note that French Bulldogs should be in a home where they aren’t by themselves very often. So, if you’re looking for a breed that can be left alone for long hours during the day, a Frenchie isn’t your best option.  Other than that, Frenchies are great dogs for families, singles, and seniors alike. They can get along with just about anyone, including other dogs. However, French Bulldogs that are not socialized with many other people or dogs during puppyhood may have a harder time adjusting.  Training Best Practices In general, French Bulldogs are relatively easy to train. Since they’re very playful, Frenchies respond well to higher-intensity training. It’s best to train these pups in short sessions, as they may become distracted and lose interest if a training session is too long. Another thing to note is that Frenchies have a tendency to be a bit stubborn at times, so it’s very important to be patient and persistent with a French Bulldog puppy during training. One of the first places to start when training a French Bulldog is with socialization. If a Frenchie puppy isn’t socialized at an early age, it will be difficult for them to be social later in life. When socializing French Bulldogs, be sure not to force this breed to interact with anyone - let them approach the new human or animal on their own.  House training is another important area in training a Frenchie, and you should start as soon as you bring your puppy home. When house training, effective communication with your French Bulldog is key. Verbal commands are a great place to start, and the smart Frenchie can catch onto them quickly. Be firm and direct with your pup, but reward them with treats and pets for good behavior.  As with most puppies, potty training a French Bulldog can be a bit challenging. It may be hard to know when your puppy needs to go to the bathroom, especially at first. Try to establish consistency by feeding your Frenchie at the same time every day, and pay attention to when he or she drinks water. Let your pup outside every hour or so, and give them praise and treats for going to the bathroom. Exercise In general, French Bulldogs don’t need a ton of exercise. However, they should still be taken on daily walks and get plenty of playtime, especially during puppyhood. Keep in mind that Frenchies are very sensitive to heat and humidity. Because of their facial structure, these dogs may have difficulty breathing if the weather is too hot, so be careful when exercising your Frenchie outside during the summertime.  Grooming and Hygiene Frenchies have a short and fine coat, but they should still be groomed with a short-bristled brush on a weekly basis to minimize shedding. This breed doesn’t shed much compared to others, but French Bulldogs do lose a reasonable amount of fur during the spring and fall shedding seasons.  Because their hair is so short, Frenchies don’t need to be bathed more than once or twice a month, unless they get too muddy or dirty. When giving your Frenchie a bath, it’s best to use a gentle hypoallergenic shampoo, since this breed tends to have sensitive skin. It’s also not uncommon for French Bulldogs to develop dry skin, so use a moisturizing or conditioning shampoo on your pup every so often to keep their skin healthy and soft.  Want to adopt your very own French Bulldog puppy? Find the perfect Frenchie for you through Lancaster Puppies today! Show Me the Frenchies!

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Aug 21, 2019

A Guide to Emotional Support Dogs

We’ve all heard the saying that dogs are “man’s best friend,” and it’s no surprise that our canine companions can be loyal pals and family members. However, for individuals living with mental health conditions, this companionship is taken to a whole new level. Dogs are capable of providing enormous levels of emotional support just by their nature, and having a loving pup in your corner makes the challenges in life just a little easier. Most dogs are eligible to become fully-fledged emotional support dogs - and can be an incredible asset in everyday life. Take a look to find out how!  What Are Emotional Support Dogs? Emotional support dogs provide their owners with comfort and support through companionship and affection. However, a dog does not need to go through any specialized training to be an emotional support dog, which makes them different from service dogs, who must be professionally trained. Essentially, any dog can be an emotional support dog as long as its owner receives medical documentation that deems the emotional support dog as necessary.  Who Can Qualify for an Emotional Support Dog? Emotional support dogs mainly assist individuals who are being treated for mental health diagnoses such as anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, panic disorder, and more. In order for the pups to be eligible, people must provide a letter from a doctor or mental health professional that states why the dog is necessary for their wellbeing.  For example, a patient with a specific phobia or panic disorder may seek an emotional support dog to ease stress in particular situations, like flying. However, they cannot officially use their own dog in those situations without first getting proper medical documentation. A dog is not legally considered an emotional support dog and does not have protection under federal law, until obtaining a note from a medical professional. Legal Rights for Emotional Support Dogs As of now, emotional support dogs have two legal protections. First, the Fair Housing Act (FHA) protects individuals with emotional support dogs by allowing the dog to live with them regardless of no-pet policies. Individuals with emotional support dogs are also excluded from being charged pet deposits. Second, the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) allows emotional support animals to fly with their owners in the cabin of an aircraft. Sometimes, emotional support dog owners must present their medical documentation in order to receive these legal protections.  Despite the common misconception, emotional support dogs are not service dogs and therefore do not have the same federal protection. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) states that “dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals…”  So, while service dogs are legally allowed to accompany their owners into public areas like stores or restaurants, emotional support dogs are not. However, certain states have different, more specific laws on emotional support animals. Popular Emotional Support Dog Breeds While it’s true that any dog can be an emotional support dog, some breeds take to it more eagerly than others. Here are some of the most popular dog breeds that are used for comfort and emotional support. Golden Retriever It’s no surprise that this breed makes an awesome emotional support dog. Goldens are known for their loyalty, love, and energy, and they are very in tune with human emotions. These pups make excellent companions and can brighten one’s mood on even the dreariest of days. Labrador Retriever Similar to Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers are some of the best companion dogs. They are very energetic, happy, and will encourage you to perk up when you’re having a bad day. They’re also incredibly smart, which makes them great emotional support dogs as well as service dogs. Yorkshire Terrier For those who prefer smaller dog breeds, Yorkies are a great choice when it comes to emotional support. While small, they have big hearts and are full of love and loyalty. They have a tendency to form very strong bonds with their owners, making them wonderful companions. They’re especially well-suited for smaller living spaces, like apartments, because of their tiny size. Collie The sensitivity and gentle nature of a Collie is second to none. They are very good at picking up on human emotions and can easily sense when their owner is feeling down. Collies are extremely devoted and full of love, which is why many individuals use them as emotional support dogs.  Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Cavaliers were bred to be human companions, making them awesome emotional support dogs. In fact, they are often referred to as the “Comforter Spaniel” because of their love to cuddle and be close to their owners. Don’t mistake their snuggly nature for laziness, though; this breed also loves to go outside and exercise! At the end of the day, not much compares to the companionship of our canine friends! If you’re looking for a puppy to potentially become an emotional support dog, check out all of the different breeds we have at Lancaster Puppies!

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Jul 10, 2019

Guide to Dog Vaccinations

Things can get hectic once you bring home a brand-new puppy. Between finding all the supplies, making all the introductions, and starting up training, it can be a busy first week! But as soon as possible - your pup should be taken in for a check-up. You'll go over your pup's health, milestones to watch out for, and vaccination details and schedule. Initial Examination During your puppy's first visit to the veterinarian, they will perform a neurological exam, looking at development, behavioral reflexes, and movement in your dog. The vet may want you to know the health and environmental history of your puppy since a problematic birth, affected littermate, or the health of the parents will affect their medical care. It's good to know what region and shelter your pup came from and a little about the mother and litter as some regions have a higher incidence of distemper. By informing the vet of your puppy's history, they can intelligently determine the type of vaccines and the best timing to administer them. A high-risk environment includes dogs living at locations with a high incidence of CDV and/or CPV. This includes puppies with known exposure to other dogs or contaminated environments. High-risk puppies may benefit from an additional vaccine dose at 18-20 weeks (5 months) of age. It's important to vaccinate your puppy at specific ages to avoid vaccine complications that can be dangerous. Even the CPV vaccine has a failure rate of 3.3% for a variety of reasons, so it's important to maintain regular communication with your vet and follow their instructions to prevent disease in your new pup. Core Vaccines In 2017, the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) updated its vaccination guidelines for the prevention of infectious diseases. Core vaccines are administered during the initial immunization phase and after completion. They provide protection against disease beyond three years. Initial immunization begins for your puppy between six and eight weeks of age and is generally finished by ten weeks to be successful at fighting disease. Some core vaccines are combined into one shot and injected below the skin. Parvovirus (CPV) Provides immunity against any canine parvovirus including CPV-2b and -2c† Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) Vaccination against a contagious and serious disease caused by a virus attacking the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems of puppies. Canine Adenovirus-2 (CAV2) Protects against an infectious hepatitis virus caused by CAV-1 and respiratory CAV-2. Canine Parainfluenza Virus (CPiV) Provides superior protection against the flu when administered through a nasal spray. Rabies Virus This vaccine is not administered before 12 weeks of age. The second dose occurs one year later. After that, you may request a one or three-year dose. Bordetella Bronchiseptica (Kennel Cough) A nasal spray vaccine that's applied at eight weeks old and again 2-4 weeks later. For puppies at high risk of infection, this vaccine is available to administer as early as 3-4 weeks old. Leptospira Protects against a bacterial infection spread through urine. Two doses are required. The first application is given as early as 8-9 weeks of age. Borrelia Burgdorferi (Lyme) Protects against canine Lyme disease. Puppies from non-epidemic areas who travel into Lyme disease regions may be at a higher risk of infection. Canine Influenza Virus (H3N8 and H3N2) Prevents 2 types of dog flu, a contagious respiratory disease. Crotalus Atrox (Western Diamondback Rattlesnake) Dosages of this vaccine vary for dogs depending on body weight and exposure risk. Although rare, post-vaccine reactions do occur. Keep an eye on your puppy for changes in movement and behavior for two weeks following vaccines. Report any changes to your vet. If you believe your dog is overdue for any one of these vaccines, visit the AAHA guidelines for action steps. Socialization As we mentioned in Training Your Puppy Part 4: Socializing, most veterinarians recommend keeping your puppy away from exposure to public parks and potential diseases until after completing the initial immunization shots. Avoid contact with potential sources of infection, like other dogs, until 1-2 weeks after the first set of vaccinations (between six and eight weeks old). However, attending socialization classes with other puppies after the first round of vaccinations does not put your dog at a higher risk of contracting a disease. In the early 2000s, animal behavioralists began to understand that behavioral problems develop in dogs who have not participated in early socialization. We now know not to wait until a puppy has completed the full series of vaccination shots before introducing them to new dogs. It's safe to arrange weekly playdates with an older calm dog who is up-to-date on their vaccinations. Vaccination Timetable 6-8 weeks old Begin core vaccines 16 weeks old Initial vaccinations completed by this age 1 year later Booster vaccine within one year of the completed initial vaccination 3 years Booster vaccination every three years    After your puppy's first year of immunization, you can ask the vet to measure your dog's antibody levels to assess whether their immune system is adequately protected against CDV, CPV, and CAV2. The diseases that vaccines prevent are always painful and often fatal. There is no reason to withhold health vaccines from your dog. If the cost of vaccination concerns you, ask a community message board where you can find a low-cost clinic in your area. Show Me the Puppies!

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Jul 02, 2019

How to Handle Trouble Behavior in Puppies

If you are the first owner to bring your puppy home, they should be a clean slate, quick to learn, and ready to bond and follow your lead. As you begin socialization training, be gentle and patient with your puppy. Keep their home and new experiences age-appropriate. However, some puppies' first weeks and months are stressful or missing a nurturing mother and litter of playmates. Other young dogs develop unwanted behaviors due to limited socialization and training. The good news is—most dogs respond to treatment and training for even the worst habits and undesirable behaviors. "Overexposure may result in excessive stimulation, stress responses, and fear, while underexposure may result in anxiety, fearfulness, and altered temperament development." - Management of Pregnant and Neonatal Dogs, Cats, and Exotic Pets, by Cheryl Lopate The most common behavioral issues reported are aggression toward owners and strangers, excessive protection of the owner, excessive barking, separation anxiety, and house soiling. But before assuming your puppy has a behavioral problem, consider other reasons why an incident may have occurred. Some problems develop due to: Pup is having a bad day. Even your puppy will have off days! Injury or medical condition. Physical and behavioral issues are often connected. Lack of exercise. Does the dog have pent-up energy or seem bored? Stress. Is something in their environment causing fear or anxiety? Compulsive and repetitive behaviors often have an underlying related medical issue and owners should first consult with a veterinarian. There are many physical conditions that affect behavior in dogs. It's possible your puppy is in distress. Veterinarians conduct a medical evaluation before coming to a behavioral diagnosis as both illness and behavioral issues often occur together. Schedule an appointment if you witness a sudden onset of aggression, personality changes, self-mutilation, excessive itching, hyperactivity, or abnormal elimination patterns. Normal Canine Behavior Before determining if your puppy has a problem, review what is natural behavior for dogs. Jumping, chewing, stealing, digging in trash, charging into people, begging, pulling on the leash, and scratching the door are common unwanted behaviors. Determine whether your dog is attempting to communicate. Jumping may be a greeting ritual. Stealing food from the countertop and digging in the trash may be connected to hunting behaviors or solely for entertainment. Scratching at the door may be a request to urinate outside. Chewing is a primitive technique to gain nutrients from grinding bones. Fear There may be a moment when your puppy is not sure how to handle a new experience. Over time, fearful experiences develop into aggression and phobias. There are four types of fear responses: freeze, flight, fight, and erratic. Learn to recognize these responses in your dog. Freeze is when the dog cowers and waits for an event to end. Flight makes a dog back up, turn away, or run. A fight response will appear as barking, growling, lunging, snapping, or biting. Erratic responses are several unconnected behaviors like scratching themselves and jumping up and down to displace stress. It's important that you do not see these moments of fear as disobedience. Your dog's expression of fear is an opportunity to teach them appropriate responses which lead to healthy coping mechanisms. Signs of Stress Several of these signs together could indicate your puppy is under stress: Flattened ears, cowering, trembling, whining, or tucked tail Wet paw pads Turning away, avoiding, escaping, or pressing against you Licking lips, yawning Fearful dogs are known to have had fewer social experiences as puppies. Socialize your new dog at a young age. Always create space for your puppy to escape a situation. Over time, fear develops into anxiety-related disorders including phobias and separation anxiety. Don't let it get that far! The biggest effect you have in alleviating separation anxiety is through daily exercise. If your pup releases enough energy throughout the day, they won't feel as nervous when you're away. Aggression If your puppy expresses aggressive behavior, it will first present between six months and two years of age. Normal aggressive behavior will begin with a signal, so knowing your puppy's personality and typical behavior should alert you when they are in distress. Aggressive behavior is considered abnormal when a reaction is out of proportion to the threat. For instance, if your dog is trained to alert you to visitors, it is not appropriate if it quickly escalates to biting. Abnormal aggression is meant to harm or threaten and can be offensive or defensive. Offensive aggression is an action meant to achieve a goal like grabbing food, obtaining the desired resting place, or in a contest for dominance. Defensive aggression is in response to aggression initiated by another person or animal and may be a real or perceived threat. Dogs who have experienced extreme pain or fear may be prompted into aggressive behavior by anxiety from past trauma. Dogs without formal training outside the home are more likely to exhibit aggressive behavior during their lifetime. Consider both puppy socialization classes and formal training with professional dog trainers. It may be frightening to witness, but don't give up on your pup if you see aggressive behavior! Dogs are generally responsive to treatment for even the most unwanted behaviors. Aggression or violent acting out against you, another animal, or a person is a reason to contact a specialist. Just to be safe, start with your veterinarian since the behavior may be caused by a medical condition or injury. Retrain Your Dog If you haven't tried basic command training, you should start up right away. If you have, keep in mind that puppies may backslide in progress sometimes - especially if they had a hard time the first time around. Nuisance behaviors are those which may be normal but often unwanted within a household. Whether the behaviors are instinctual or common dog communication, you still want your puppy to follow the house rules. If you want a disciplined dog you must be a disciplined trainer. Your puppy will learn from your lessons what you consider to be acceptable behavior. You must be consistent, meaning every time a behavior occurs you always respond with the same training technique. For example, yesterday, you came home from work to find the trash can tipped over and wrappers and food spread over the kitchen floor. Knowing that sometimes your dog finds food in the trash is a strong motivation to knock it over. To them, it's definitely worth the effort just to see if there is something fun in the bin. Your response as a trainer must always be to reinforce good and wanted behavior. Manage your home spaces to assist in training your puppy. Start by putting away objects that lead to nuisance behavior. For example, do not allow your dog into the kitchen if they look for food on the countertop. Set up barriers, use a playpen, hide the trash can, and close curtains to the view outside. Some of your puppy's behavior is normal for a dog but you still don't want them to do it. How do you change unwanted instinctual behavior? Your approach to unwanted puppy behavior is positive reinforcement. Redirect unwanted behavior by ignoring it. When the puppy takes the action you want, reward them every time. Current scientific research doubts all dogs descended from wolves. The human/canine relationship should not be structured like a wolf pack. Do not assert dominance in order to place your dog in the alpha position. Do not growl or pin your puppy down. When humans train dogs in this manner, they teach the dog to respond to humans similarly. Dogs who are dominated eventually attempt to assert dominance over another animal or human. Watch your own body language. Don't bend or loom over your puppy. Set aside frustration and wait until you are in a friendly state of mind to begin a lesson. Use a happy voice. Rewards-based training is the method to use. Puppies want to please the person to whom they have the closest bond. Don't worry that positive reinforcement results in "spoiling" your puppy. Dogs who are treated as if they are human or part of the family do not exhibit more behavioral problems than any other dog. Focus on teaching your puppy which behaviors you like. For example, praise your dog when they chew on appropriate toys. Or, ignore jumping and reward your puppy when they sit. Mark good behavior with a sound (eg. a clicker), verbal affirmation, and reward. Reward appropriate behavior every time you see it. Reward and Reinforce Discover what your puppy enjoys and use these things to reward and reinforce wanted behavior. Strengthen good manners by using everyday situations to expose your pup to appropriate behavior. The American College of Veterinary Behaviorists sees it as asking your dog to say “please” before every encounter, event, action, and activity. Teach your dog to sit and stay before every action—like opening an outside door, meals, exiting a car, receiving a toy or ball, and attaching or removing a leash. For every behavior you do not like, find an alternate behavior to replace it. Then, reward your pup after witnessing the opposite or desired behavior. Be patient, because your dog will likely try harder to keep the old behavior before abandoning it entirely. The Takeaway Give your dog a job to promote mental health and happiness. A lack of physical and mental exercise leads to many nuisance behaviors. Remember, dogs want a job and to work hard for the things they receive. Both early life experiences and exercise affect anxiety in your dog. When your puppy gets enough exercise, you will find a tired dog who barks, chews, and jumps less. Looking for a new puppy to add to your family? Get one on Lancaster Puppies today! Show Me the Puppies!

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Jun 20, 2019

Training Your Puppy Part 4: Socializing

Your new puppy started their canine education weeks before adoption day. The process of introducing a pup to the world to new people, animals, and places is called Socialization Training. Now, you are the trainer who is responsible for slowly exposing your puppy to sights, sounds, surfaces, foods, people, animals, and places. Do not delay the socialization of your new puppy. It's essential to begin immediately. The critical time period (the first 12 weeks) can be affected by prior experiences, breed, and their own unique personality. After this period, it's more difficult to change a dog's social behavior, how they act within their environment, and how they act toward other animals and people. Socialization with Other Dogs By playing with other dogs, your puppy learns hierarchy and other instinctive canine behaviors like bite inhibition, competition, and sharing. Waiting to socialize with dogs may permanently affect your puppy's social behavioral development. That's why the first eight weeks with their own litter is crucial. If your puppy did not live with a litter for at least eight weeks, this will affect their ability to quickly house train and learn appropriate play. Appropriate play between puppies and adult dogs will teach how hard and long to bite. Puppies can only learn this from other dogs—first from their mother and siblings and then, from older dog friends. At first, limit the length of the visits with other dogs. Always end on a good note with friendly words and a treat. Competition and sharing milk and toys teach your puppy that they won't always get everything they want. It's an important lesson to show your dog that there are times they need to wait, share, and how to appropriately ask for food, toys, and attention. As an added bonus, spending time with other dogs can help puppies understand beginner potty rules. Vaccinations Most veterinarians recommend keeping your puppy away from exposure to public parks and potential disease until after completing a full series of vaccination shots (approximately three months old). Dangers your puppy can be exposed to regularly include animal feces, urine, lawn fertilizer, and litter. However, attending socialization classes with other puppies after partially completing initial vaccinations does not put your dog at higher risk of disease. Do not wait until your puppy has completed the full series of vaccinations before introducing them to new dogs. Instead, arrange weekly play dates with an older, calmer dog who is up-to-date on their vaccinations. Make sure the introduction is gentle and not overwhelming for your pup. Go outside in your own yard and create fun for both dogs. During dog play, your puppy will learn appropriate biting, like how long and hard is okay. An older dog will correct your puppy with a gentle verbal or physical warning when it crosses the line. Supervise the playtime, ready to stop play before it gets out of hand. Watch your puppy's body language and make sure they always have space to back up or run away if needed. However, don't intervene unnecessarily. Your puppy is learning how to interact and communicate with other dogs through body language and signals. Socialization Classes and Puppy Parties Some research has shown a positive impact of puppy socialization classes on future adult behavior. Puppy socialization classes aren't focused on obedience. This playtime is a practice ground for puppies to learn from each other with gentle direction from trainers. Ultimately, attending puppy socialization classes improves the chances of good pup behavior, and people are less likely to rehome. Socialization with People Along with dogs, it's important for your puppy to socialize with humans. This is critical to the formation of emotional attachment (bond) to people. Without gentle handling and a comforting voice, your puppy will lose the ability to bond with any human by 14 weeks of age. Playing is an important component in the development of dogs. You'll notice play barking, biting, a raised paw, and tail wagging. As your puppy grows, play becomes more elaborate and complex. All of their natural inclination toward play should be incorporated into your puppy's training. Take it slowly and gently when meeting new people. Expose them to people of all ages, sizes, personalities, clothing, facial hair, and gear (like glasses). Dogs who meet children during socialization (3-12 weeks) do not show aggressive behavior and, in fact, have lower heart rates around kids than dogs with no exposure during this important time. Regular visitors to your home will also need an introduction. Remember, you are not just showing off your new puppy, you are teaching the pup how to meet new people and preparing them to be confident around people for a lifetime. Mail and delivery carriers, neighbors, dog sitters, and friends will be some of the new people you should introduce to your pup. Socialization to Places Gradually expose your puppy to the common activities and sounds in your home. First introduce sounds from a distance, like an adjacent room. Startling sounds include a hair dryer, doorbell, vacuum cleaner, and the neighborhood garbage collection. Unusual surfaces in their world may include shiny floors, concrete, staircases, and gravel. Walk around the neighborhood with your puppy and allow them to view their new environment from a safe distance. Take a ride in your car and stop at places you frequently visit, like the post office or an outdoor café. Age-Appropriate Socialization (0–4 Months) Touch, play, and speak with your dog in a soothing voice.     Introduce new people in your home and at the veterinarian clinic. Communicate your rules when meeting new people. Don't allow anyone to scare, intimidate, or overwhelm your puppy.     Schedule weekly play dates with healthy, vaccinated, patient dogs.     Carry the puppy on walks using a stroller or sling. Take car rides and public transportation. Visit an outdoor café or restaurant. Encourage exploration by hiding treats to find and allowing them to approach people. Socialization Timeline Dogs 3-8 weeks People 5-12 weeks Environments 10-18 weeks Time Alone It's possible that your puppy has never spent time alone before moving into your home. Warming them up to periods of time that you will be away from home is a part of socialization training. Your puppy needs both time by themselves and time alone with you. Without anyone at home, your puppy will eventually become comfortable alone and it will decrease the possibility of separation anxiety. If you use crate training, do not place two dogs in the same crate. Your new puppy needs to learn that it's okay to be alone because, after a period of time, you return. Spending one-on-one time with your puppy will build a bond and develop the language you share together. The more time spent alone with you increases the bond. If you have more than one dog in the home, build trust and a unique relationship with each pup by spending time alone daily. Try Your Best Try these socialization techniques to the best of your ability to accustom your new pup to its surroundings. If you don't have the time, classes are an excellent option. After all, if you don't properly socialize your puppy they may become anxious, or even afraid, in novel situations for the rest of their life. Puppies want to be happy and to make you happy, and when they're socialized they'll have the tools they need to do so. Looking for your new furry friend? Find one on Lancaster Puppies today! Show me the Puppies!

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May 21, 2019

Training Your Puppy Part 3: Leash Walking

To get started, there are a few beginner training steps that are necessary. After all, training a puppy to walk next to you, at a set pace, and alert to verbal and non-verbal cues requires advanced learning skills from your pup. Training exercises build a bond and a language to communicate. Remind your pup that you, the master, have fun and interesting things to share and they will be rewarded for paying attention. Plan to leash train once or twice a week, but no more than that. If you train daily, it may take longer for your dog to learn. Remember, there are two ends of the leash; one attached to your dog and the other end in your hands. Before asking your puppy to learn new tricks, become familiar with canine behavior and proper leash training techniques. Is Your Dog Dragging You Back, or Pulling You Forward? In the perfect world, by gently tugging on your dog's leash they would follow. That’s not generally how it goes, however. There are two main camps when it comes to difficult-to-walk pups - dragging or pulling. Puppies Who Just Won’t Move These pups plant their feet and lean back until the collar or harness slides right off. Your new puppy has a natural instinct to resist the pull of a leash and it's called “Opposition Reflex”. If your puppy walks behind you and you feel as if you are dragging them along, keep a squeaky toy in your pocket. When your dog loses interest in following your lead, squeeze the toy to engage his prey drive. Toss the toy down the path and praise them when they run ahead. The goal is to maintain your pup's attention during the walk. Dogs tend to resist more when pulled by the head and neck. Some trainers believe a dog harness will reduce the opposition reflex and allow the owner to redirect the puppy. However, it takes more than a specific collar or harness to teach your puppy how to properly walk on a leash. Puppies Who Speed Off If your dog darts forward, pulling you with the leash, you have a different problem. Trainers recommend a collar and loose-leash training for dogs who pull. Loose-leash literally means, while walking, the dog is not pulling the leash tight, and there is slack. The simplest solution to solve pulling is for the master to stop walking and encourage the puppy to return. When the dog comes back to you, reward them, pause for a moment, and begin walking again. Stop every time the dog darts forward. They quickly learn that when they stay by your side and listen, rewards are given. Training Tips for Walking on a Leash Introduce the leash inside your home. Choose a time that is quiet with the fewest distractions. Attach the leash to the D ring and let it drag behind the puppy. Let your dog become familiar with the leash before picking up your end. Don't pull your puppy with the leash but wait for them to notice you and then give the first reward and praise. Begin walking around the home with your dog on the leash. Your actions should remind the pup that paying attention benefits them. Every time they look at you, respond to your voice, walk a few steps beside you, reward their behavior. Train After Potty Generally, it’s a good idea to wait until after your puppy has gone to the bathroom before starting a leash training lesson. Giving your dog the opportunity to urinate and release a little energy will make it easier to hold their attention. Bring Treats Decide on a verbal cue to let your puppy know when they are allowed to begin walking. “Let's go,” is a good one. Take a step and if your puppy also takes a step, let them know you are proud. While training, praise your dog and reward them frequently for all good behavior. When the pup knows you will reward them for following commands, they will pay close attention to what you are saying and doing. Change Your Pace Walking at a consistent pace does not come naturally to dogs. They want to sniff, mark other dog's spots, and play. Puppies have a short attention span. As soon as they are bored, they'll look for something else to do. So, change up your pace during the walk—brisk, slow, run, and trot. Keep your puppy's attention by continually altering the walk and reward them for maintaining their focus on your instruction. Finish with Play Playing with puppies after a lesson improves training memory. It reinforces your bond and the idea that working together is fun and rewarding. Play encourages good behavior because your new puppy wants to make you proud. Walking in a straight line at a specified pace is not a natural canine activity. Remember, they have a built-in instinct to pull back. Learning to walk on a leash will improve your puppy's problem-solving ability and confidence in taking on new challenges throughout their lifetime. So, be patient while teaching your new pup. And give rewards for every little accomplishment. Good luck! Show Me the Puppies!

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Apr 26, 2019

Training Your Puppy Part 2: Potty Training

Potty training a puppy can be tough, and it’s very important to go into the process with patience. Having an open mind and an open heart for your new puppy is crucial to their success. After all, even though they may not know when and where to go, they can tell when you’re frustrated. It won’t happen overnight - and accidents are normal. Just remember, it’s all part of the learning process. They’ll get it!  With consistency and patience, the puppy will be able to learn the do’s and don’ts of how to do their business. Space Limitation Puppies are excitable and curious, and they’ll get into absolutely everything. Immediately after the puppy steps foot into their new environment, they’ll explore every nook and cranny. But they won’t know the potty rules yet! To protect your house, and help set the rules for your new pup, it’s important to keep them in a smaller space at first. Don’t worry, you can expand the space over time. As long as the ground rules are still being set, and the puppy is still having accidents, it’s okay to keep them in a smaller space. Whichever space you choose, it should be close to the family. Puppies need to feel included! The kitchen is a good example of a central space in the home for housebreaking a puppy. It’s usually close to the living room, where the family spends time together. As an added bonus, it’s also usually hardwood or linoleum - materials that can withstand accidents. Here are a few ideas for keeping a mischievous puppy in a smaller space. Crates Dogs are naturally den animals. Creating a comfortable place for the puppy to retreat to, discourages them from going potty there. Find a crate where they can stand, lie down, and turn around. Size is important! If the crate is too big, they will think it’s okay to relieve themselves in the corner. Add some comforting items to make the crate as inviting as possible. A blanket, a chew toy, and a personal item of yours will go a long way towards making your pup feel content. The more your puppy wants to be in their den, the easier it will be during training. Most importantly, don’t overuse the crate. It’s intended to be a safe place, and should never be used as punishment. Baby Gates Puppies need to be constantly supervised! Realistically, this may seem like an impossible task if you want to get anything done in the house. By using a baby gate, the kitchen becomes a safe space where the puppy can roam without soiling the carpet or getting into anything dangerous. The confined space should be large enough that they can play, but small enough that they can always be seen. Baby gates can keep most pups in the space without causing much stress. Puppy Pads Puppy pads are a good starting point for training young pups. They’re absorbent, and they protect your floor while giving your puppy a hint about where to go. Place a puppy pad in the space you have prepared, and situate it as far from the food and water dishes as you can. Your puppy will start out going everywhere, but as soon give them praise for puppy pad soiling, they will gradually understand that the puppy pad is the right place to go. Keep it up, and over time you can slowly move the puppy pad closer and closer to the door - and to the outside! Sometimes, it can help to find a pheromone spray, or even another puppy's pad, to train younger pups where to go. Get Into a Routine Routines are key in puppy training. Without a regular schedule, puppies feel confused and will resort to instinct. To avoid confusion and create the most learning-friendly environment that you can, establish a regular schedule with your puppy. Having a consistent daily routine helps puppies learn what to expect when, and how to behave. Here are some examples of how to use schedules: Feeding Routine Puppies need to be fed about four times a day. If your puppy is fed at the same time every day, it increases the chances that they will need to potty at the same time as well. It gives you predictability and allows some planning for when you need to take your pup outside. As well as keeping your puppy on a regular feeding schedule, their food should also be taken away between meals. Removing the temptation will help them stick to their feeding times. Also, removing their water dish a couple of hours before bedtime will help eliminate the urge to go in the middle of the night. Potty Schedule Don’t let your pup wait too long to go! Start the day by taking your puppy out first thing in the morning. Puppies have tiny bladders, so they will have to go out frequently. As you build a consistent potty schedule, remember to also be consistent about where you take your pup to go. If they are taken to the same spot outside, the scent will encourage them to continue using that area. A rule of thumb: a puppy can only control their bladder for one hour per month of age. So generally speaking, if the pup is three months old, they should never have to wait longer than 3 hours to go. If the puppy has to wait any longer than this, accidents are guaranteed to happen. It’s always better to have a wasted trip outside than having an accident happen inside! Use a Leash A leash is the perfect training tool to teach a puppy where to go. Puppies are distracted easily; so you can keep them on track by leading them to the potty area. When the puppy reaches the potty area, you should use a verbal cue when it is time to go. Great examples of cues are phrases like “time to potty” or “do you need to go outside?”. After using the cue, if your puppy goes, great! Give them praise and have a treat at the ready. If not, keep trying! But as long as the puppy is on a leash, they won’t be as tempted to wander off. Positive Reinforcement It’s generally not a good idea to punish a puppy for having an accident in the house. Instead of learning that going potty inside is wrong, they may just become afraid of going potty in general. Try to use positive reinforcement when the puppy does well to encourage them to always go outside. Rewards The puppy needs to be rewarded every time they potty outside. The reward can be anything from verbal praise to treats - but the key is when to give it. A reward given at the right time will cause the correct behavior to repeat itself, without excessive effort. A reward given at the wrong time can be counterproductive. If the puppy is interrupted and rewarded in the middle of relieving itself, there is a possibility it will stop, take the reward, and then finish the deed inside the house. Also, the puppy shouldn’t be rewarded when coming back into the house after pottying. It needs to be rewarded outside, promptly after it's finished. This can be tough! But timing it right really makes the difference. Remember: Accidents Happen Even a house-trained pup can have an accident now and again. Limit the chances of accidents by keeping an eye on them indoors. If your puppy is having a hard time, during socialization training you can introduce another dog who is already trained - and have your pup observe. They will often learn from each other, and this can be incredibly useful. With consistency and patience, your puppy will be potty trained in no time! If you need help with other aspects of puppy training, like simple commands, check out the rest of our training guides. Show Me the Puppies!

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Apr 09, 2019

Training Your Puppy Part 1: Basic Commands

Teaching your dog basic obedience is important for many reasons, both behavioral and emotional. The first few weeks with your pup are critical in establishing a positive relationship with your new furry friend, and a great place to start is with basic commands. Keep reading to learn more! Set Up a Training Space To get started, bring a few training tools into a safe, enclosed yard. You'll need to use six components: a dog handler (that's you), a dog, verbal commands, hand signals, a noise, and rewards. Keep in mind, before filling your pocket with a handful of treats, consider what sort of reward reinforces good behavior but isn't so exciting that it distracts your puppy. This can be tough! Try to get treats that don't take a long time to chew, swallow, or are so amazing they forget what you are focusing on. After all, training time is about repeating the lessons quickly enough so that the desired behavior is easily learned. Once you have a solid treat, you can get down to business. Common commands in training are "come", "sit", and "stay.” For the youngest of pups, start by rewarding them every time they respond to the sound of your voice. Right away, you are teaching the dog to pay close attention to your words. Some trainers like to use a clicker. The clicker system of training quickly and precisely indicates to your dog what behavior you are rewarding. If you use a clicker, always give the reward after making the click sound. Let your little guy run loose in the yard. Every time they look your way, give praise, a noise, and reward. If the puppy seems distracted and you cannot get their attention, use a squeaky toy. When they look your way, give praise, make the noise to reinforce good behavior, and lastly, reward with a small treat. Repeat these steps often; you are teaching the pup how to respond to their world, and how to communicate with you. The Power of Verbal Commands Getting your puppy to adopt a new behavior will go more quickly if you start giving rewards a few weeks prior to introducing the verbal command. For example, before teaching your puppy the word “sit,” give a treat periodically when he or she sits on their own. You are linking the sitting behavior with the treat - and then you can introduce the verbal command. Repeating this over and over along with the signal and a noise produces fairly quick results. "Come" When teaching your puppy verbal commands, begin with “come.” Initially, don't worry about actually saying it out loud. Wait for the pup to look at you, call out their name in a happy and inviting voice, and say “good boy/girl.” If your puppy becomes distracted, try getting them to chase you. Turn around and let them catch up with you, then give verbal praise and a reward. When you see that the puppy keeps an eye on you because you are the bearer of great rewards, introduce the verbal command, “come.” "Sit" When your pup learns that coming and interacting with you leads to a positive experience, they are more likely to move on to new verbal commands. Think of the command “sit” as meaning “watch me.” At this level, you can pair simple gestures with verbal commands. For example, a hand signal is a visual hint at the motion you want the dog to repeat. For "sit,” stand near your puppy and hold your hand above their head, then move your hand in a semicircle. Move the signal down their back, and move to their rear end. Your puppy will follow your hand motion and naturally sit. Give him or her a treat, and repeat! Additionally, you can try "sit" by positioning the dog with their back end near a wall. As you signal to sit and they back up, their rear is bumped by the wall. It becomes a reminder of what the verbal command refers to and the pup sits. Any hand signals you use during early training can be decreased or dropped as your dog understands the verbal command. "Stay" Now that your new pup understands and responds to the command “sit,” they're in the precise position you need to teach them “stay.” The hand signal for “stay” can be the same one used by traffic police. Face your hand toward the dog with all fingers together pointing up. The training steps are: say “stay” quickly and firmly, hold your hand up, wait three seconds, and reward the puppy with a “good dog” and a treat. Follow “sit” with “stay,” and you will have two verbal commands working in conjunction. It’s also important to note that most commands are about action, and your puppy will associate their name with movement. That said, you should not use your dog's name when verbally commanding “stay.” Since “stay” is often required for safety, like sitting still on the opposite side of the street until you reach your dog, don't confuse them by shouting their name while verbalizing this command. Tying it All Together Teaching a puppy commands is really just setting up your own communication system with an animal. Along with commands, consider other phrases you use while talking to your dog. Phrases are another way to build a language and bond between the two of you. They are useful and train your dog to listen intently any time you speak. Examples of common phrases are: “Bedtime for (pup's name).”   “Go for a ride?” “Go for a walk?”   “Need a drink?” “Ready to eat?”  With a little bit of patience and a whole lot of love, puppies can be trained in no time. Try to make it a fun experience, enjoy yourselves, and know this new relationship is developing into a lifelong friendship. Looking for your newest furry friend? Find one on Lancaster Puppies today! Show Me the Puppies!

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Mar 27, 2019

Pomsky: The Adorable, Tiny Designer Dog Invented by the Internet

Pomskies, Huskies, and Pomeranians aren’t so different—except that the first wouldn’t exist if it weren’t for the Internet sensation, Buzzfeed.  Each of these dogs is part of the Spitz family. The word “Spitz” doesn’t refer to a breed of dog. Rather, it refers to a category of dogs that have distinct characteristics: small, pointed ears with fur, long, thick double coats, almond-shaped eyes, a wolf-like resemblance, and a fluffy tail that often curls over the back or droops. All Spitzes have fur in between the pads of their feet to keep them warm when they’re working as well as strong jaws and a wedge-shaped head. In fact, that’s where the name “Spitz” is derived. It means “pointed” in German. The long fox-like faces help keep the air warm as it moves through the nasal passages. Through selective breeding, Spitz-type dogs have been used to hunt, herd, and pull sleds before becoming lapdogs with smiling faces. Now they’re being crossed to create a designer dog that’s become a phenom: the Pomsky. Pomeranian Huskies Are Tough to Spot Many confuse Pomskies with other members of the Spitz group including Mini Huskies, Finnish Lapphunds, and Alaskan Klee Kais. With the designer dogs’ history, it’s easy to see why. These dogs all sort of look like a Pomsky.  That’s because Spitz-type puppies have a resemblance to mini Husky-looking dogs. The Spitz category lumps many dogs together from the Arctic region and Siberia. These cold-weather dogs have retained their wolf-like physical characteristics as well as character traits like independence and suspiciousness. These breeds tend to be loyal and good-natured. Most Spitz are generally relatively easy to train, though they can be stubborn. Out of the Spitz family, one of the most popular first-generation crossbreeds continues to rise in popularity: the Pomsky, a mix between a purebred Siberian Husky and a purebred Pomeranian. This hybrid breed has been accepted into the Designer Breed Registry as well as the Dog Registry of America (DRA), the International Pomsky Association (IPA), and the Pomsky Club of America (PCA). Pomskies, Pomeranian Huskies, Husky Pomeranians, or “Huskeranian” as they’re often called, aren’t 15-25 pound mutts. Mutts don’t have a known ancestry. Pomskies do. And it’s legendary. Pomskies: The Real Story Behind These Designer Dogs Although it’s been estimated that there are between 50 and 70 different types of Spitz today, one of the most popular is a “designer,” “crossbreed” or “hybrid mix”: the Pomsky which came into existence in 2012. The Pomsky comes from two Arctic dog breeds: the 4.2 to 7.7-pound Pomeranian, whose forerunner was the German Spitz, and the 35 to 60-pound Siberian Husky.  The Pomeranian is a small, friendly, and intelligent breed that often barks in new situations. The Siberian Husky is a robust, strong working dog used to pull sleds. Together they create the Pomsky, an adorable ball of fur.  According to Internet legend, the Pomsky was first introduced to the world when a woman posted a question online about whether her family should adopt a Pomeranian/Siberian Husky mix from a shelter. The owner was wondering about the health of the dog. The vet at the clinic dismissed that the two could be bred. Time passed, and no one really thought about the hybrid. By 2011, Buzzfeed Senior Editor Peggy Wang was doing her job: sharing cute stuff on the Internet. She knew the formula for making popular articles at Buzzfeed, but she needed to figure out a way to show cute, intriguing baby animals on the Internet. She wrote an article entitled: Pomskies: The Pomeranian + Siberian Husky Mix: Cutest Designer Dog Breed Ever? Also, a Pomsky is a much better and more respectable name than a Labradoodle. The problem with her adorable article is that Pomskies didn’t exist, at least not in a photograph-able format. She needed to find a dog with a double thick coat, in a variety of colors like a Pomeranian and a Husky. It needed to be a small to mid-sized dog that may grow to around 20-25 pounds. The goal was to create a Husky-looking ball of fluff—but in a laptop version—that stood around 10-15 inches.  Since she didn’t have a photo of the Pomsky, (because it didn’t exist) she used pictures of small, fluffy Spitz-type dogs that weren’t Pomeranian Husky mixes at all.  Photos of fake Pomskies were taken from Buzzfeed and placed on Reddit, including an adorable photo of Tequila the Finnish Lapphund, taken by photographer Tommie Ohson. Despite the photographer’s insistence that Tequila in the Buzzfeed article was his brother’s Finnish Lapphund and not a mythological Pomsky or Huskeranian, the photo of the cute little fluffy dog still grew in popularity. Peggy Wang’s post received more than 100,000 views. Since no one really heard of a Pomsky before, no one suspected otherwise. After that post, many puppies that were cute, fuzzy, and small were called a Pomsky. Once the Pomsky reached popularity on the Internet, breeders used purebred dogs to make it a reality, namely an amateur dog breeder named Tressa Peterson of Apex Pomskies. She and her friend Joline Phillips began researching their first breeding stock by getting a male Pomeranian and a female Siberian Husky. On March 5, 2012, the first official American litter of Pomsky puppies was born between a purebred female Siberian Husky and a purebred male Pomeranian. But the reality of creating a Pomsky litter isn’t as simple as posting cute photos to the Internet. How Are Baby Pomskies Created? Typically, a female purebred Siberian Husky is artificially inseminated by a purebred Pomeranian male. Semen is collected from the male and may be inserted into the female immediately or it can be chilled or frozen until the female goes into heat up until four days before ovulation begins. Forty-eight hours later the process is repeated. Many females are artificially inseminated through transcervical or endoscopic placement. AI is done because of the size difference of the two breeds and would be even more difficult to use a Pomeranian female because she wouldn’t be large enough to carry and give birth to puppies that large without risking her health. Due to the size difference between the Siberian Husky and the Pomeranian, f1 generation Pomskies are created by artificially inseminating the female Husky. This is typically carried out by practicing veterinarians and experienced inseminators. Artificial insemination has been used in the cattle industry for years and recently moved to dog breeders. There are several pros: artificial insemination helps decrease stress on the parents when the stud and dam are separated, and AI can also widen the gene pool. But there are several cons, the chief being price. There are significant costs for stud fees for AI. Typical stud fees can be up to $1,000 but AI prices vary based on the dog’s pedigree. And despite the fees, the odds of getting pregnant are around 52 percent and up depending on a variety of circumstances. Many assume that when they purchase a cross breed it will have all the best qualities from both parents. That’s not necessarily true and genetics don’t work that way.  Although based on previous breeding the puppies behave in a good-natured and gentle way with children. They’re often very lively and are quick to learn. Breeders can’t determine which genes express themselves in the puppies and because the hybrid is so new there isn’t much historical data to predict which aspects of the parents will be dominant and which will be recessive. This is why the dog can vary dramatically in size, colors, and markings. It takes several generations of breeding to achieve consistency in temperament, working ability, and size.  As an example, the following are Husky coat colors that are common as well as coat patterns:  Agouti Black and White Chocolate Copper / Chocolate Red Medium/Dark Grey Orange Copper Pure White Red and White Red Copper Sable Saddleback Silver Wolf Grey Dirty-Faced Siberians Piebald Pinto Splashcoat Plus, a Husky can have a mask in the following colors: Clover Mask (Goggles) Dirty Faced Siberians Full Mask with Bars Full Mask. No bars, no eyebrows. Full Mask. No bars. Open Face, No Mask The following Pomeranian colors for their long, fur coat is also common as are their markings: Beaver Black Blue Brindle Chocolate Cream Lavender Orange Red Sable White Wolf Sable Brindle Merle Parti Tan Point Black mask There is not enough data at present to predict how the qualities above will express themselves through genetics nor is there enough data to forecast health concerns or behavioral problems because these dogs can inherit anything from the parent breeds. The result is often unpredictable. Just by looking at colors, it's tough to make an educated guess on how the pup will look. The Pomsky puppy won’t have a standard look but it won’t be a teacup either, because dogs that fall under 5 pounds qualify as teacups. One pup can look different from another even if they are from the same litter. Some look more like Siberian Huskies; others look like Pomeranians. It all comes down to dominant genes. Hybrid dogs, like Pomskies, may have genetic problems but it’s typically lower than purebred dogs because the gene pool is mixed. Purebred breeders who breed Huskies to Pomeranians create a first-generation hybrid where they don’t know the exact size, look, or temperament of the dog. These breeders believe in hybrid vigor and the heterosis effect. Since there is no standard look, it’s so easy to mistake Pomskies for miniature wolves, Miniature Huskies, Finnish Lapphunds, Alaskan Klee Klais, or other fuzzy Spitz-type puppies.   Siberian Huskies and Mini Huskies Aren’t Pomsky Huskies A Mini Husky is sometimes confused with a Pomsky. Bree Normandin began breeding Mini Huskies in the 90s by selectively breeding smaller Huskies. This means Mini Huskies and standard-sized Huskies have the same pedigree. Minis have the same pedigree as the Siberian Huskies, however, Minis have been selectively bred for their size. Still, they retain the signature double coat, the same colors including white, black and white, grey and white, brown and white, red and white, cream and white, sable and white (sometimes called ‘black-nosed reds’), or silver and white or Agouti (meaning wild coloring or wolf-like). They may come in three greys: wolf grey, silver, or medium dark grey. These dogs may also be copper or black but those aren’t standard colors recognized by the AKC. Although Mini Huskies may have saddleback markings, be piebald, pinto, dirty-faces, or black points just like a Pomsky, the dogs are not the same.  Teacup huskies don’t exist as they are bred from medium-sized dogs; most teacup varieties are bred down from miniature-sized dogs and weigh less than 5 pounds.  American Klee Kais Aren't The Same as a Husky Pomeranian Mix A Pomsky is also not an Alaskan Klee Kai, as is commonly mistaken. The Alaskan Klee Kai companion-sized dog that resembles an Alaskan Husky. An Alaskan Klee Kai was developed by Linda Spurlin in Wasilla, Alaska from the 70s to the 80s by blending the Alaskan Husky, Siberian Husky, Schipperke, and American Eskimo dog to produce a companion-sized version of the Alaskan Husky without leading to dwarfism.  Named after the Eskimo word for “little dog,” the Alaskan Klee Kai is not an AKC registered breed, but it is a rather small hunting dog. It’s also not a Pomsky. Finally, although a lot of mystery surrounds its beginnings, it’s easy to see why the Pomsky has become a popular designer dog. The hybrid combines a majestic Siberian Husky with a compact Pomeranian. The result is a gorgeous new companion that’s a fun, energetic ball of fur.  Show Me the Pomskies

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Oct 04, 2018

4 Adorable Facts About Labrador Retriever Puppies

Labrador Retrievers are among the most popular dog breeds in America. However, there are still a few things you might not know about this loyal, lovable breed. Keep reading for some interesting facts on the Labrador Retriever! Labrador Retrievers are One of the Smartest Dog Breeds The smartest dog breeds are considered the brightest in working intelligence and obedience. Plus, many have outstanding temperaments. Highly intelligent dogs can pick up most tasks within five repetitions and can remember them. They also listen to their handler most of the time and respond in a timely manner. Labradors had to be intelligent because they were once used in the icy waters of Newfoundland in the 1880s to haul in nets for fishermen, connect boats, bring in ropes, and help hunters retrieve downed birds. Labrador Retrievers were bred to be versatile, rugged, well-rounded water dogs. Not only are they intelligent, they were bred to have a thick coat for the icy waters, webbed feet to paddle through, and a thick, rudder-like tail to propel and steer through the water. These dogs were originally bred to be sturdy, with an excellent nose and a love of water, wrapped up in a medium-sized body. Today, males weigh up to 80 pounds and stand 22.4 at the withers; females reach up to 70 pounds and stand 23.5 inches tall. To this day, these dogs excel in dock jumping, and the largest recorded jump was 30 ft. 7 inches by a lab named Storie.  Most Popular Dog Breed in America Labs have been America’s favorite dog for decades. These dogs will do anything they can to please you. Many people love that they’re loyal, friendly, and make fantastic family dogs. Of course, they’re natural at retrieving, and they love car rides, the beach, snow, and playing with children and other animals. Long walks are one of their favorite pastimes. So, why are these dogs so popular?  In 2003, the American Kennel Club discovered that there are three times as many labs as there are Golden Retrievers. Many believe this is because Labs are so versatile, and they have an easy-going, happy personality. People love kind, outdoing dogs who want to be friendly companions and hard workers. Historically, Black Labradors have long been favored for their agility and ability to work well as a gun dog. Chocolate labs are beloved family pets and have been hunters and working the show ring for a long time. Each’s dogs’ coat is covered in a slightly oily substance which keeps them warm and dry and many people love a wash-and-wear dog.  Labs Love to Eat Feet and color aren’t the only traits you’ll notice about Labs. They’re food hounds, and they never forget exactly where you last dropped a crumb. They have been known to beg when their owners are eating and give sad puppy dog eyes.  These dogs are most willing to please when there is an opportune treat around. Many Labradors have been known to come across no-no food and will inhale as much as possible before they can be stopped. These pups can pack it on quickly.  Still, they are great beggars and pose a low risk for bites. In fact, with proper training, you can develop your Labrador to have a soft mouth where it can carry an egg in its teeth and not crush it. This may be quite helpful in training. You can get a Labrador’s attention quickly with food and treats, which is a great form of positive reinforcement. As with all dogs, all owners should be careful to balance food with exercise. It is important to keep weight to a healthy level and make sure your Lab goes to the vet. Find a good daily workout for the dog. He’ll love running, playing, walking, or letting him run in a fenced-in yard. They’re great biking and jogging partners and love to burn energy.  The Powerful Bond Between Labs and Humans When people look at dogs, their physiology changes. Their pupils dilate, their blood pressure returns to normal, and cortisol levels drop. Why? People are bonded to animals. The animal bond helps people in emotional, psychological, and physical distress. Dogs help people heal, which is where therapy dogs and emotional support dogs come into play. These pups and their handlers have undergone extensive courses to be able to serve all types of populations, from hospital settings to nursing homes. Labrador Retrievers are also commonly used as service dogs. Service dogs make it easier for people with disabilities to work and live where they currently are in life. The dogs love it because it gives them a sense of purpose, and they have the innate characteristics to help with the tasks at hand.   Find Lab Puppies Puppies For Sale  

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Sep 24, 2018

Goldendoodle Puppy: A Hybrid Dog Worthy of the White House

Goldendoodles are hybrid dogs, which are often called “designer dogs” in the media. Some mislabel a “designer dog” as a “mutt.” But there’s a distinction: “designer” or hybrid dogs have a purebred ancestry that is documented; mutts do not.  Why Breed a Goldendoodle? Hybrids came about in the 20th century when breeders began crossing purebred Poodles with other purebreds. Monica Dickens first bred the Goldendoodle in 1969. She wanted to develop guide dogs for people with allergies and visual impairment. In this instance, the goal was to blend the Poodle’s non-shedding attributes and other positive features like intelligence and agility, with purebred Golden Retrievers that have a natural disposition to be great family dogs. Thus, the Goldendoodle was born. Popularity spread in America and Australia in part because Goldendoodle’s coats do not shed the way other breeds do. They shed similarly to a Poodle. As a result, Goldendoodles release less dander, a sticky protein made of flakes of dead skin that can cause an allergic reaction. Dicken’s dogs were dubbed “hypoallergenic.” However, "hypoallergenic" is a misnomer because people can be allergic to anything. Dogs with a predictable, non-shedding coat can help people with allergies suffer less. Many dogs’ fur grows to a point and then sheds; Poodle hair, on the other hand, continues to grow and produces low dander. Popular and Famous Hybrid Dogs What is it about Goldendoodles that garners so much attention? Goldendoodle puppies have continued to gain popularity since the 1990s.  One even graced the cover of Life Magazine with the headline “The Perfect Dog? How the Doodle Became the New Family Pet.” Ten years later the reporters at Time Magazine continued to follow the hybrid dog trend and covered “How Designer Dogs Are Made.” Over the years many public figures showed interest in hybrid dogs, including the Goldendoodle. Singer Jessica Simpson had a Maltipoo named Daisy, actors Jake Gyllenhaal, Julianne Moore, and Uma Thurman had Puggles and Ashley Judd had a Cockapoo. The 44th president of the United States Barack Obama’s daughter Malia wanted a Goldendoodle, before settling on Bo, a Portuguese Water Dog. Then, there was a Goldendoodle named Dozer who broke free from his invisible fence in the yard and made headlines when he joined in the Maryland Half Marathon at the five-mile mark along with 2,000 other participants. Dozer didn’t have a racing bib, but he crossed the finish line at the 2:12:24 mark and inadvertently helped raise awareness for the University of Maryland’s Greenebaum Cancer Center. These dogs are remarkable but how are they created? How are Goldendoodles and Hybrid Dogs Crossed? Not all hybrid puppies are 50% purebred with another 50% purebred. This only happens in an F1 generation. F1s (finial 1 hybrids) are created by breeding one pure-bred dog (like a Golden Retriever) with another pure-bred dog (like a Poodle). The puppy becomes a 50-50 mix and is a first-generation hybrid. These hybrids may be healthier than their parents. Some of these puppies will shed; some will not, and this cross may not be ideal for people with allergies. F1 crosses are said to have the most hybrid vigor, heterosis, or outbreeding enhancement which is designed to improve or increase any biological function in the puppies. The hybrid puppies exhibit homogeneity and are often predictable. Plus, these puppies have two different versions of the same alleles. This means there are two different versions of the enzyme present. This lowers the chances for genetic defects in F1 generations. F1B puppies, or backcross puppies, would blend an F1 (Goldendoodle) with another dog (Poodle). The pure-bred ratio would be 25% and 75%. These puppies often have wavy, curly, or shaggy hair and are the best bet of Goldendoodle for people with allergies as they rarely shed. F2 puppies are second-generation. They are developed by crossing an F1 hybrid with another F1 hybrid. That means one Goldendoodle mated with another Goldendoodle. These dogs will most likely shed. F2B puppies are second-generation backcross dogs that are often called Multigen Doodles. These dogs have less hybrid vigor, heterosis, or outbreeding enhancements but they have an increase of certain traits like non-shedding. This means not all these designer hybrid dogs being bred are 50% purebred to 50% purebred and it is very common for breeders to breed multi-generation crosses.  Goldendoodle Benefits In the end, if you’re looking for a Goldendoodle you’ll find these dogs long to serve people through attentiveness, obedience, and intelligence. These smart and clever dogs make trusted therapy dogs in hospitals and hospices, as well as seeing eye dogs and emotional support dogs. They’ll make long-lasting bonds with family members and pets. You’ll quickly see why their popularity continues to climb.   Show Me the Goldendoodles!

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Sep 20, 2018

15 Pictures of Loyal and Affectionate Rottweiler Puppies

Powerful Rottweilers began as working dogs and have developed many talents over the centuries. One moment they’re rough and the next, these good-natured clowns are playful, fun-loving, and gentle with family. You’ll find a Rottie placidly swimming in a pool, chewing on toys, sleeping in funny positions, or staring at himself in the mirror.  Many families call them “big babies” or “gentle giants” yet other owners want them to be anything but.  Pick the Right Rottweiler Temperament To begin picking out a gentle giant, look to the parents. Look at their size, temperament, and personality. Watch the puppies in their litter. Look for a puppy that is neither aggressive nor submissive. Avoid picking “Alpha” pups that growl, nip at your hands, and avoid picking a puppy that’s too shy or afraid. Rotties have a wait-and-see attitude. Their natural aloofness means Rottweilers don’t make friends indiscriminately and aren’t welcoming of strangers until properly introduced.  How to Introduce Your Rottie to People and Pets Training a Rottweiler puppy isn’t always an easy task. It will take time and it’s necessary to have a strong but gentle hand to raise, train, and socialize these dogs. Prevent dangerous situations through social interaction and training while they’re still puppies. It helps stave off territorial aggression. Avoid keeping Rotts stuck in the house all day without socialization, otherwise, the dog will behave cautiously around anyone it doesn’t know.  To begin socialization, keep the puppy on a lead and introduce him to an acquaintance slowly. Allow the pup to approach a calm and relaxed person. The puppy will most likely sniff the hands and feet first.  If you notice the young Rottie is growling, getting snappy, or nipping it’s important to oversee your pup, step in, and take control of the situation. You may hold the pup under the collar or put a long line connecting to the collar, so the pup can calm down and the owner can reel in the animal. Walk the puppy on the lead to further calm it down. Spend time properly training your Rottie; make sure it’s never in an abusive or neglectful circumstance. Reward the puppy when you notice positive behavior changes.  Praises, exercise, edible treats, and toys are good rewards. Rottweilers are obedient and can be taught skills like “sit,” “down,” “come,” to eat on command, and “stay” as young as 9 weeks through clicker training, classical conditioning, and obedience classes. Make sure to treat these dogs as though they’re part of the family with lots of love and affection. Just don’t be surprised if your pup seems to conveniently forget it’s not a lap dog and will try to squeeze its oversized body onto your lap for attention. Be advised males can grow to be more than 130 pounds and stand up to 27 inches at the withers. Their big, heavy bodies make it a challenge to get it off your lap once it’s there. Molossus, Butcher’s Dogs, and History How did these giant dogs come to be? How did they get the stigma of being aggressive? Is it because they have 328 pounds of bite pressure?  It’s important to look at the historical context to understand their strengths, demeanor, and how their jobs have evolved over time due to human needs.  Some scholars believe Rottweilers descended from a Mastiff-type dog called the Molossus of Italy. It’s a well-known breed of antiquity that came from what’s now known as Greece and Albania in 5,000 B.C. Molossus were believed to be highly intelligent, dependable, and rugged. The original Molossus or Molossian hound was a working dog that had been adapted to match what humans needed. At the time it was important to people to have livestock guardians that also protect people. The smart, heavy dogs were bred to be a strong deterrent against predators. Molossian hounds were renowned for their ability to guard home as well as livestock. People lauded them for their bravery in their ability to fend off wolves or thieves and hunt large game. These devoted animals were biddable and eager to work. Many dogs have stemmed from the Molossus, including the Bernese Mountain Dog, Great Dane, Newfoundland, and Saint Bernard. Each has huge strong hindquarters, square heads, and large bone structures. Scholars have various theories about how the Molossus was used by ancient man. Some scholars believe that the Molossus with its heavy dewlap and a wide short muzzle would fight in ancient Greek wars wearing mail armor and protective spike metal collars. Other scholars believe Molossers were used for hunting and herding.   From Molossers to Rottweilers Molossers were used in ancient Rome for campaigns as well as to herd and guard animals.  Around 74 A.D. the Roman army traveled across the Alps into Southern Germany. When the Romans encountered Germany many of the herding dogs were left behind. These dogs were bred with local, German dogs in the town of Rottweil. There the Romans used the dogs to work as herders and by butchers to drive cattle to market and carry home the money they received for their goods. Often the money was tied around the dog’s neck for safekeeping. These dogs were called Rottweilers, or Rottweiler Metzgerhund meaning butcher’s dogs.  For the next few centuries, these dogs were continually used to herd, and drive cattle and haul meat to and from markets (hence the name Butcher's Dog) until the dogs were first replaced by donkeys, and then in the 19th century, railways replaced droving.  As the need to bring meat to market dwindled there was a decline in the number of Rottweilers available. The breed nearly became extinct.  War Revived the Rottie During World War I there was a resurgence in interest due to an increase in demand for police dogs. During both World Wars Rottweilers served in many roles including messengers, ambulance, draft, and guard dogs. Today there is a life-sized bronze statue created by Ottman Hrl in 2005 that heralds these brave dogs in the city of Rottweil. In the end, these dogs are revered because not only are they brave, strong, hard workers that look intimidating, but they’re also cuddly, wonderful, devoted dogs that work in search and rescue, with police officers, as service dogs, and in therapy dog work. They’re strong working dogs that enjoy having a job to do. When properly trained and socialized, these dogs can be playful and goofy. Some howl in unison with other dogs, snuggle on beds, make funny noises when a family member scratches its head, romp and play around the house (and accidentally knock over furniture in the process), interact with themselves in the mirror, jump on trampolines with their families, or play with kittens or puppies in a playful and gentle way.  Show Me the Rotties!

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Sep 18, 2018

Top 5 Smallest Dog Breeds

Small dogs are cute, especially when some of these pups are roughly the size of a teacup. Upon seeing a tiny dog, some people will assume the dog is a toy, and in a way, they are right. The smallest dog breeds are part of the toy group. The term “toy group” is used by kennel clubs to define a set of dog breeds that are small or miniature. Some people refer to these dogs as “teacup dog breeds." Over the past 15 years or so, interest in small dogs has been rising, but why? The Benefits of Small Dogs Miniature dog breeds are great for urban areas and apartment living because they don’t need much space inside or out. If you’re someone who allows dogs on your bed or couch, small dog breeds won’t hog the space. These companion dogs are easier to bathe than larger dogs, too, because they’re compact and lightweight. In fact, the smallest dog in the toy group, the Chihuahua, may only grow to 6 pounds and stand 5 to 8 inches high. Small dogs are loyal and intelligent companions that tend to live longer than dogs with more mass. Small breeds may live up to 13 to 15 years whereas larger breeds may live 10 to 12 years. Experts estimate that for every 4.4 pounds of mass a dog has, it may reduce the dog’s life by a month. Many people long for small dogs that don’t shed because they want a hypoallergenic pet that won’t trigger allergies. It’s important to know that no canine is 100% hypoallergenic, but dogs like Yorkshire Terriers, Shih Tzus, Bichons Frises, and Schnauzers (to name a few) shed less and have a coat that retains loose hair. These are good choices for allergy sufferers. That said, all dogs produce dander and have proteins in their saliva that can irritate people with allergies. Ultimately, many people love small dogs because they are easy to cuddle, walk, and carry.  5 Smallest Dog Breeds Papillons, Toy Poodles, Pomeranians, Yorkshire Terriers, and Chihuahuas are the smallest dogs in the toy group. See how they stack up compared to one another. Papillon Papillons are hardy little dogs that grow to 7-10 pounds and are 8-11 inches tall from the withers to the floor. The name Papillon is French for “butterfly-eared,” and the dog gets the name from the trademark long, fringed hair that comes from the ears. It’s said to look like butterfly wings. When the ears drop, the dogs are called Phalène, which is French for “moth-eared.” Both Phalènes and Papillons can come from the same litter. Often Phalènes are not bred with Papillons because the offspring can have one erect ear and one that is dropped. The Papillon (or Continental Toy Spaniel as it is sometimes called) is covered in a single coat of long, fine, straight fur that is predominantly white and has patches of black, lemon, red, sable, or tri-color. This breed needs to be groomed frequently but is moderate to low shedding. The dog’s tail has long hair, and it curls over the back much like a squirrel. This is how Papillons got the nickname “Squirrel Spaniel.” These happy dogs aren’t always ready to cuddle (though historically they were used as lapdogs during the 13th century). They are, however, friendly and affectionate. Paps are known to be intelligent and eager-to-please so they can learn tricks quickly. In fact, they rank up near Poodles in intelligence. These dogs are often heralded for their athletic and spirited nature which is favored by competitive agility and obedience trainers. Because of their diminutive size, Paps often do well in homes with adults. They are fragile; their delicate nature doesn’t always mesh well with children. These dogs are also very loyal and have been known to lay at the feet of their owners and follow them around the house. Paps aren’t the kind of dogs that need coddling in hot or cold weather, but they also shouldn’t be left outside unattended in winter, either. Papillons can be yappy, but they’re not prone to excessive barking. Paps will vocalize in apartments when they hear noise from neighbors. It takes these dogs a bit to get used to strangers. Overall, this toy spaniel is a favorite of many who meet him. He is a healthy small dog with few health concerns. The most notable are luxated patella, anesthesia sensitivity, Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA), and Fontanel. Toy Poodle Poodles were first called Pudelhunds, a German word that translates to “puddle dog.” They are sometimes called Caniches, too, because these dogs were once used as water retrievers for duck hunting. Caniche comes from the word “cane,” which is a female duck. Poodles come in Standard, Miniature, and Toy. The Toy version has reportedly been used for truffle hunting because these lightweight dogs won’t crush delicate fungi with their feet. Often Poodles are bred for companionship over hunting abilities. This active, intelligent, and elegant dog is well-proportioned and squarely built. The smallest Toy Poodles grow to 13 to 15 pounds and are no more than 10 inches tall. Poodles are covered in a single coat of dense, curly hair that doesn’t shed much. These dogs are less likely to trigger allergies than other breeds. If you’re looking for a small breed that doesn’t shed much, a Toy Poodle can be an excellent option. Much like how the Papillion’s fur doesn’t fall off the dog but rather becomes tangled in the surrounding fur, a Poodle’s hair coat behaves the same way. Toy Poodles release fur and dander but are less likely to trigger allergies than other breeds. Still, Poodles need trimmed every 4 to 6 weeks. The small, cuddly Toy Poodle is one of the most affectionate breeds and is extremely intelligent. With firm, consistent training and frequent exercise, the Toy Poodle is one of the most trainable breeds. These social and energetic dogs have provided companionship and affection to families for many years. Best of all, this popular dog breed is generally healthy and may live up to 18 years.  Pomeranian Hailing from the Duchy of Pomerania (where present-day Germany and Poland are located) the Pomeranian is a 4 to 8-pound dog that stands 6 to 7 inches high. These small dogs are covered in a textured coat with a plumed tail that sits high and flat. These companion dogs have a thick double coat that comes in more colors than any other dog breed. The double coat consists of a short undercoat beneath a longer, bushy topcoat. The fur is extra bushy on the shoulders, neck, and chest. It’s recommended to brush the dog daily to twice weekly. Poms don’t require excessive grooming, but they are seasonal shedders. Still, these dogs don’t shed as much as the amount of fur would imply. Yorkshire Terrier    Little dog lovers admire the Yorkshire Terrier, often called a Yorkie. These pups typically weigh 3 to 8 pounds and stand 8 to 9 inches tall. This popular companion dog was developed to catch rats in cotton and woolen mills in 19th-century Yorkshire, England. Back then, when workers from Scotland came to England for work, they brought small terriers with them. These terriers had a long coat, docked tail, trimmed ears, a blue body, and silver or fawn head and legs, and were dubbed a Yorkshire Terrier. It's interesting to note that Yorkies don’t shed. If not groomed, these dogs will keep growing hair and it can grow to more than two feet in length. Show dogs usually have a long coat, but many owners keep their Yorkies trimmed down to a puppy cut. Chihuahua  The smallest dog breed hails from Mexico and weighs about 4 to 10. It stands 5 to 8 inches tall at the withers and was bred to be a companion dog. The smallest dog in the world, according to the 2014 issue of the Guinness Book of World Records was a 2-pound Chi named Miracle Milly that was a mere 3.8 inches tall. It’s been theorized that Chihuahuas came from the Techichi, a small-framed dog that was domesticated by pre-Columbian Mesoamerican people like the Maya and the Toltec. It’s also been theorized that Chihuahuas were a cross between the Techichi and the Chinese Crested. Still, others believe Chihuahuas are linked to a mostly hairless dog, the Xoloitzcuintli (Xolo) which hails from Mexico and has roamed there for thousands of years. Chihuahuas come in many colors like white, black, and tan, and may be marked, spotted, or splashed. Chis have either a smooth coat or a long coat. Smooth-coat Chihuahuas feel whiskery or velvety, while long-haired Chihuahuas feel even smoother, in part because of the dog’s guard hairs and silky undercoat which also gives them a fluffy appearance. Ironically, long-haired Chihuahuas shed less than short-haired Chihuahuas and don’t need to be trimmed. Active and intelligent, many of these toy dogs are gentle family companions that somehow convinced people that they should be carried everywhere. When they’re not being carried, Chihuahuas will often burrow in blankets, pillows, and hampers or will lay in the sunshine. Most are affectionate and prefer cuddling close and often do quite well in homes with other Chihuahuas because they have a clannish nature. Expect them to be part of your clan for a long time. Chihuahuas may live 15 to 20 years. In the end, if you want to add a small dog to your home, consider the Papillon, Toy Poodle, Pomeranian, Yorkshire Terrier, and Chihuahua are solid choices. Show Me the Puppies!

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Aug 16, 2018

10 Surprising Facts About German Shepherds

German Shepherds are amazing. They watch TV, have a history of heroism, and have been in the Guinness Book of World Records. Discover 10 interesting facts about German Shepherds you never knew. 1. They Watch TV According to Science Daily, German Shepherds, like all dogs, are able to distinguish faces of other pure bred dogs on TV. Science suggests animals from the same species interact socially and when they gather, they notice the similarities between group members. Turns out dogs can distinguish a dog from another animal. This may be why German Shepherds enjoy watching TV with you, especially when you put on dog shows. 2. They View You as Part of Their Pack German Shepherds—and many other dogs—may be eager to snuggle, nuzzle, and lay their heads on you. Dogs view you as part of their pack and want to stay safe and close to you. This behavior also releases a chemical called oxytocin in humans, a bonding hormone, which makes you feel connected to the dog.  3. They Love Car Rides German Shepherds enjoy riding in cars because they may feel as though they’re on the hunt with you. According to Natural Dog Training, people perceive hunting as chasing, stalking, or killing prey whereas dogs may feel a state of “emotional suspension” and feel weightless. Riding in the car produces the same feeling. Since you’re in the car with the dog, the dog may view you as being on the hunt with him. 4. They Skydive! According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the first dog to ever go anti-poaching skydiving was a 2-year-old German Shepherd. His name is Arrow and his owner’s name is Henry Holsthyzen. The duo tandem-jumps out of planes in the thorny, subtropical South African Busveld to hunt down poachers. Arrow then tracks animal poachers and ignores the wildlife. He’s also trained to sniff out contraband at ports and patrol his area.  5. They All Share the Same Ancestor A dog named Horand von Grafrath is the genetic basis for all German Shepherds. The dog was thought to be a well-rounded example of what a German Shepherd ought to look like and so Captain Max von Stephanitz sired the dog. His most notable offspring were named Beowolf, Pilot, and Starkenburg. These dogs are the ancestors of all German Shepherds today. 6. A German Shepherd Was the First Seeing-Eye Dog Morris Frank was the first person to get a seeing-eye dog named Buddy in 1927. The female German Shepherd was named Kiss before Morris changed his name to Buddy. Morris got Buddy from Dorothy Harris Eustis who trained GSDs to work as police dogs before shifting her work to training them to lead people who lost their sight. 7. They Save Lives According to ABC News, a 7-year-old named Molly Deluca was saved from an Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake bite when her German Shepherd named Haus refused to leave her side. The duo was playing in their Hillsborough County, Florida yard when the rattler struck the dog three times on his right leg after he stepped in between the girl and the snake. The situation seemed grim, but Haus was given round-the-clock treatment with anti-venom at a Tampa veterinary clinic, Blue Pearl Pet Hospital. The bill racked up quickly. A family friend of the DeLucas created a GoFundMe page to help pay for the bills. The fundraiser netted $52,000.  Haus made a full recovery and was released back to the Deluca family. The remainder of the funds were donated to a local animal shelter. 8. They're Soldiers SSgt. Julian McDonald, a dog trainer and 75th Ranger Regiment in the U.S. Army, used Layka, a military combat dog to save the lives of his team. SSgt. McDonald was serving in Afghanistan when his German Shepherd was shot four times at point-blank range after she was put in a building. She was shot instead of the members of his platoon. After extensive surgery, and a leg amputation, Ssgt. McDonald adopted the Layka because he felt like she was one of his combat brothers. After adopting her, he continued to take her to work, allow her to sniff out bombs, and do bite work. Most of the time the three-legged GSD enjoys retirement in his home. 9. They're in the Military A U.S. Marine turned mercenary dog trainer, Alex Dunbar operates independently to train German Shepherds for the military, private military, and the police force. One of his dogs has a titanium tooth embedded in his mouth for a devasting bite. He uses his war dogs to find terrorist leaders. 10. They're Heroes German Shepherds were used in the terrorist attack on Sept. 11 and worked 16 to 18 hours a day, for 7 to 14 days at a time to search for the deceased and injured. One of the search and rescue dogs was a German Shepherd named Apollo. He and his handler Peter Davis were the first to arrive after the collapse of the second tower to look for victims. He was a member of NYPD’s K-9 team and was also trained in urban search and rescue.  See German Shepherds for Sale

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Jul 19, 2018

5 Puppies That Won't Get Big

Looking for a puppy that won’t get too big? Look to the toy group and non-sporting group. Many of these dogs retain their round faces, big eyes, and small noses even after they’re fully grown. According to Austrian biologist Konrad Lorenz’s idea of “kinderschema” these traits, along with large foreheads, round features, and round bodies elicit a nurturing response in people and make them act tenderly. If you’ve got a soft spot for little dogs and want a pooch that’s easy to walk and take places, explore these 5 breed recommendations. Bichon Frise The cheerful, even-tempered Bichon Frise with a round face will grow up to 11 inches tall and weigh up to 12 pounds. These little guys are easy to cuddle. In fact, Bichon Frise means “curly lap dog” in French. These pint-sized dogs don’t cost as much to feed as larger breeds. Bichons get along well with children, pets, and city living. These sweet, affectionate dogs are excellent for companionship and have been popular amongst European nobility throughout history. Bichons are small, active dogs with clownish personalities that can be quite entertaining although these social animals are prone to separation anxiety. This peppy little dog descended from the Barbet, a medium, wooly-coated French water dog, and has retained its signature coat. Bichon puppies are covered in a plush white, cream, or pale yellow non-shedding curly coat that feels velvety to the touch. It almost feels like a cotton ball. The high-maintenance fur needs constant care including professional trims by a groomer.  Delicate Bichons have large, black eyes, black noses, and lips and are part of the same family as the Havanese, Maltese, Coton de Tulear, and Bolognese. Boston Terrier Nicknamed the “American Gentleman” the gentle and affectionate Boston Terrier will grow to be up to 1 foot 3 inches at the shoulder and weigh up to 25 pounds. These study and muscular dogs are easy to walk because of their smaller size. Boston Terriers have round, expressive faces with a short, wide muzzle. They snort, grunt, and occasionally bark. Boston Terriers have three striking color patterns: brindle, black, or seal with white markings. Seal coloring looks black but when the dog stands in the sunshine it causes the fur to appear red. These clownish, sweet-natured dogs were originally bred to be fighting dogs. They came from mixing English Bulldogs with the now-extinct English White Terrier. Nowadays the Boston Terrier has come a long way from his fighting roots. Boston Terriers of today are companion dogs and delightful friends. With their boundless energy, these dogs are the life of the party. It’s best to keep an eye on them when they’re in warm conditions. Boston Terriers tend to overheat and suffer from respiratory issues due to their squished, wrinkleless snout.   Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Cavalier King Charles Spaniels will grow no larger than 13 inches tall and weigh around 18 pounds. They are roughly the size of adolescent spaniels. Their sweet, gentle, and loving temperaments mean these pups are nice to everyone and they love being showered with affection. Keep them on a leash, though, because these dogs are not particularly street-smart and may run into traffic. Cavaliers have a hunting instinct and may chase small animals or birds. This small spaniel thrives on human interaction and will happily live anywhere. Historically these dogs sat on the laps of nobility and slept in their beds to attract fleas. Nowadays this kissable pooch has a gentle, melting expression and large dark eyes and comes in four colors: Tri-colored or Prince Charles, Black and Tan or King Charles, Ruby or Rich Mahogany, and Chestnut and White or Blenheim. Their silky, slightly wavy coat has feathering on the feet, tail, chest, legs, and ears which begs you to pet it. Chihuahua If you want a pint-sized “purse dog” with a big dog attitude look no further than the 6-pound 8-inch-tall Chihuahua. Their rounded or “apple” heads, erect ears, and large expressive eyes practically beg you to put the dog on your lap. Oftentimes Chihuahuas will be intensely loyal and protective over one person and want lots of attention. These tiny dogs don’t do well in cold weather but will get lots of attention from people when you take the dog out in public. Havanese Havanese are smart, trainable extroverts that keep barking to a minimum. Dubbed the “Velcro dog,” the Havanese will grow to be about 11.5 inches tall and weigh up to 13 pounds. They aren’t mature until at least a year old. Havanese hail from wealthy dog owners in Cuba who wanted a companion dog. This little pup isn’t a backyard dog, and it can be a challenge to housetrain. Havanese love learning tricks and will require exercise like a daily walk. These affectionate and happy dogs prefer to be with their owners as opposed to anywhere else. Ultimately, if you’re looking for a dog that looks like a puppy and won’t grow to be much larger than one, the Havanese, Chihuahua, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Boston Terrier, and Bichon Frise are smart choices for a next pet. Show Me the Puppies!

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Jul 03, 2018

5 Best Farm Dogs

Some dogs are naturally hard-wired to work on the farm. They’re called herding dogs, livestock guardian dogs (LGD), and scent hounds. Herding dogs, also known as working dogs or stock dogs, control the movement of animals. Guardians protect livestock from predators and theft. Scent hounds are used to track down and kill vermin. All these dogs thrive in environments where they protect animals and land. Many working dogs are brought to farms as puppies to be raised alongside the livestock and veteran farm dogs. This helps pups learn their role. Guardians view the livestock as part of their pact, care for them, and will learn to protect them at all costs. Herding dogs often live with the family and serve as an everyday companion as well as a furry farmhand. Scent hounds track down a varmint’s smell and kill it before it burrows through the ground, leaving divots and holes that can injure livestock. Herding dogs, scent hounds, and guardians perform many roles on today’s working farms. Explore five dogs worth adding to your ranch. 1. Australian Shepherd Australian Shepherds are hands-on herding dogs that want to be part of the action. These high-energy dogs are not afraid of confrontation. They weigh about 50 pounds, bark to command the livestock’s authority, and are assertive. Aussies work quietly and respond to the herder’s commands to keep cattle, horses, goats, or sheep together. These fearless dogs know how to turn stock back with or without force. They’ll nip at the animals’ heels, grip the face or nose, or give a penetrating stare so livestock know who is in charge. Over time, Aussies will learn when to apply force and when to just stand their ground. Australian Shepherds are great for rotating cattle and work the head of the stock. Some cows are reluctant to leave their pasture, and often an Aussie’s presence is enough to get the herd to move. These dogs, with their intense stare, draw an invisible circle around the stock. If the Aussie pushes the herd in one direction, and they respond, the dog won’t cross the invisible line. 2. Bernese Mountain Dog Bernese Mountain Dogs (or Bernese Sheepdogs as they’re sometimes called) come from the canton of Bern in Switzerland. They have been used to pull produce carts and have served as livestock guard dogs throughout history. Berners are large, sturdy workers that do well in cold climates. They’re skilled at herding, obedience, agility, and tracking because they’re easy to train. These docile and good-natured dogs excel at drafting and will pull carts and wagons. Some people enjoy drafting as a pleasurable hobby; others still rely on the Berner to pull carts for work. 3. Australian Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dogs, also known as Blue Heelers, develop a strong attachment to their owners and are protective of people and their possessions. Historically, these dogs have been used by drovers to move wild cattle by nipping at their heels. The dog’s instinctive grip can make wild or stubborn livestock move. Cattle dogs will grip and release the stock’s weight-bearing leg to encourage reluctant cattle to travel long distances to the stockyards. These fast-learning dogs can be taught to carry out routine tasks after learning it a few times. Then, the Australian Cattle Dog can work with no supervision to solve complex problems. They’re smart and love working, which makes them ideal for ranching, agility, and flyball. This dog requires little grooming and has a high level of activity, so when you’re ready to work, they are, too.  4. Border Collie Border Collies are thought by many to be one of the smartest domestic dogs. These workaholics were born to herd and have an instinct to work and provide companionship. If they don’t have a job to do, they’ll get bored and, as a result, find a destructive outlet like chewing shoes and pillows.  Border Collies have an instinctive urge to herd and do well with farm labor. These medium-sized dogs are the lord of all they survey and keep a close eye on livestock. Border Collies listen for the rancher’s commands or whistle to herd cattle, sheep, pigs, and poultry by circling them, nipping, and barking. These dogs will drop to a crouch and stalk the livestock with a fixed stare. Border Collies can be trained to help pull hay off the back of a truck and can do well in agility competitions. 5. Dachshund It’s been theorized that Dachshunds came from ancient Egypt because archeologists found engravings of stubby-leg dogs and mummified wiener dogs. The tenacious, perseverant, and stubborn dog may have been used to hunt small game. Nowadays the “badger warrior” or “badger crawler” can be an asset on a farm. These small dogs with a barrel-like chest and a deep, loud bark, excel in badger baiting, hunting foxes and rabbits, and pest management because they excel at digging and maneuvering through tunnels. This gives them the nickname “earth dog.” Dachshunds can be used to protect the farm from vermin. These pests can contaminate feed, gnaw on electrical components, and burrow through the ground, causing holes that trip livestock. The Dachshund is a mighty little hunter that can be used to control rodents before they destroy the livestock’s health or chew through structures. Ultimately, if you’re looking to add a dog to your farm consider these five hard-working breeds which will make your job easier by protecting and herding livestock, pulling heavy loads, and protecting the farm from pests.  Show Me the Puppies!

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Jun 20, 2018

Top 8 Best Dogs for Apartments

Apartment hunting with your dog isn’t easy. You’re looking for a space you can afford, but you also read over the fine print in your lease and discovered that the place you want has pet size, age, and weight restrictions. You’re ready to shell out the pet deposit, pay pet rent, and even pet insurance. You’re looking for a pup that thrives in tiny living spaces, has a reasonable energy level, isn’t too noisy, and is friendly enough to keep the neighbors from complaining. Luckily, we've rounded up 8 dog breeds that are best suited for apartment living - keep reading to learn more! Bichon Frise This magnificent dog has a fluffy white, semi-hypoallergenic coat that feels plush and velvety to the touch. Bichons shed less than many other breeds which makes them suited for people with allergies. The pooch will grow to a foot tall and weigh 12-18 pounds when fully grown. Since they’re small, Bichons don’t need a ton of space to move around which makes them perfect for apartments. These happy-go-lucky non-sporting dogs seem to have a smile on their face whether they’re curling up on the couch for a quiet night of Netflix or whether they’re taking a brisk walk around the urban neighborhood. These toy dogs enjoy watching people through windows while you’re at work and moderate exercise, walking, and romping when you get home. Boston Terrier Boston Terriers are ideal for apartments because of their size. They’ll weigh 10-25 lbs. and stand up to 17 inches at the withers. This often falls within apartment guidelines. Dubbed “American Gentlemen,” these short, compact, and easy-to-train pups are great for small spaces like studio apartments. Their gentle but plucky disposition makes them ideal for singles and the elderly. Bostons can be energetic. They need brisk walks around the complex to stay healthy and happy. Fortunately, they don’t require much grooming. A gentle brushing with natural bristles is enough to keep the dog clean-cut and polished. Make sure to brush in the direction of the hair’s growth and give them a bath about twice a year unless they’re coated in mud. Since they don’t require much grooming, your roommate won’t complain about dog hair all over the place. These loving, devoted, and enthusiastic little dogs love to go on adventures just as much as they love to snuggle under covers. Just don’t be surprised if they snore more than you do! Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Looking for a quiet, apartment-friendly cuddle bug that’s big on belly rubs? Look no further than the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. Their sweet face and big eyes will welcome you home. This toy dog gets attached to their owners, so they enjoy smaller spaces. (It’s less space to cover when they’re following you around.) Cavaliers are super loyal, affectionate, and eager to please. These little dogs have big hearts, get along with everyone—even your nosey neighbors in the complex—and aren’t known to disturb people by being yappy. Weighing between 13 to 18 lbs., Cavaliers are smaller than Boston Terriers and don’t need much room to roam. These well-balanced dogs are renowned for their good behavior which will make your co-op board happy. These mild-mannered and outgoing dogs prefer to curl up on your lap because they’re fiercely loyal, love a good nap, and crave human contact. It’s best not to leave them alone for too long as they can get separation anxiety. If you’re elderly, telecommute, or are a stay-at-home parent, you’ll find you have a little shadow that follows you everywhere.  Dachshund These cute, lively little dogs with a famous silhouette do well with indoor exercise. Their legs are so short, it’ll be a workout just to walk around your apartment. Most standard-sized Dachshunds grow between 16 to 32 pounds and mini Dachshunds are under 11 pounds. Still, it’s best to take these sausage dogs on a walk for exercise because they’re prone to obesity and with too many treats they’ll start looking like a fat little bratwurst. Afterward, a Dachshund will most likely get a nap. Wiener dogs wind down quickly. Believe it or not, these pint-sized cuddle buddies were once bred to hunt vermin like badgers and rabbits. The name Dachshund means “badger” from “Dachs” and “hund” for “hound dog.” Though athletic, they’re not distance runners and aren’t built for jumping, but they are remarkably intelligent and want to please their owners. They may be short on size but they’re big on personality. Their strong bark makes them excellent watchdogs for your small space. Plus, if you end up with a mouse, you’ll have a little fellow to get it for you. French Bulldog Get ready to fall in love with a plucky little snoring dog with signature bat ears. French Bulldogs are dense and weigh between 16 to 28 pounds. Their silly and charming disposition has been known to fascinate neighbors, strangers, and children. Their big, expressive eyes suck you in and make you fall in love. Historically they’ve been fashionable with many groups of people: from high-society women to writers, artists, and designers. The Rockefellers and the J.P. Morgans reportedly had these pups, but of course, they lived in bigger housing. This small breed domestic dog typically gets along well with other pets because they’re not overly boisterous. Frenchies don’t need tons of exercise, and since they’re small and easy to groom, they’re fairly low maintenance. Keep in mind that French Bulldogs are not good swimmers, so it’s best to exercise them by walking or playing a game of fetch. Havanese The Havanese, Havana Silk Dog, or Spanish Silk Poodle, is shorter than a foot tall and is a happy, outgoing dog that’s great with pets. They may grow up to 13 pounds, but this small, sturdy dog has a history of being a pampered lap dog for the aristocracy and is now becoming popular with American urbanites. There’s a good reason. Owners dub them “Velcro dogs” because they never want to leave your side and are easy to tote. Since they’re so attached, it’s best to crate train when you’re away for long periods of time as they can get separation anxiety and may be destructive. This cherished playmate is great for families with allergies because they have a very soft double coat of continuously growing silky hair that’s more hypoallergenic than other breeds. No dogs are completely hypoallergenic, though some dogs may not aggravate allergy symptoms. This small dog will shed less danger than larger breeds and the National Dog of Cuba will require grooming. This small, quiet, and adaptable pooch won’t annoy your neighbors with yapping. Maltese If you’re a homebody who prefers to lounge around after work, get ready to meet the ultimate companion dog. This toy dog has always enjoyed a life of luxury and has been a pet of royalty around the world. Their only job has been to keep people company, but the breed gets along well with non-canine species, too. These gentle, affectionate, and full of energy pups shed less than other dogs and are pretty low maintenance. They’re covered in long, silky white hair that needs to be groomed but much like the Havanese, it will create less dander than larger dogs. It may take some time for the pup to adjust to its new surroundings. A Maltese will bark at unfamiliar sounds, so it might be wise to explain to your neighbors that the pup is getting used to its new home.  Pug Pugs do well in the city and the country and were bred to be companions. If you want a slightly lazy, small, and mischievous dog you’ve found it. These popular city dwellers love to entertain. Pugs will make you laugh with their breathing, snorting, and various other sounds. These dogs aren’t known to be yappers but will reverse sneeze when they get too excited. Pugs weigh between 14-18 lbs, but their cobby bodies easily put on weight. Don’t be surprised if your neighbors come out to pet your dog when you take it for short walks. This breed gets a lot of attention for its wrinkly face, rose or button ears, and curly tail. They get along well with pets and people. Provided you can control the temperature of your apartment and keep it moderate, Pugs do well in apartments, but they’re sensitive to extreme temperatures. If you’re looking for a low-activity dog that loves to cuddle and doesn’t need much room to roam, you’ll love adding a Pug to your apartment. In the end, regardless of the breed you choose, give your pup time to get used to its new apartment, and it's ill-advised to leave your dog alone for long periods of time. If you're looking for a new puppy, find one on Lancaster Puppies now! Show Me the Puppies!

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Jun 14, 2018

Puppy Teething: What You Need to Know and Do

Puppies have sharp milk teeth used to explore the world. Teeth are survival tools that allow them to eat food, chew, and defend themselves. Teeth are also social and communication tools used to get attention, wrestle, and play.  All puppies regardless of whether they are brachycephalic, mesaticephalic, or dolichocephalic are born with teeth buried below the gum line. By the three-week mark, most pups begin to develop some of their 28 deciduous teeth. The squishy-faced French Bulldog, medium snoot Cocker Spaniel, and long-nosed Dachshund will all develop 42 adult teeth. By the time the puppies are eight months old, they’ll develop 10 molars, 16 premolars, two canines, six incisors, and eight premolars that fit in different head shapes. These adult teeth won’t regrow if they’re lost and it’s rare to see them get cavities. However, you may find that short-snouted dogs are more prone to dental calculus, plaque, and tartar buildup than others.  When Do Puppies Lose Their Teeth? Teething happens gradually and causes a bit of pain. Puppies will drool, chew, have swollen gums, and a poor appetite as their first set of teeth push through the gum line. This happens when the puppies are around two to four weeks old. By the time your puppy is five to six weeks old, he should have developed 28 milk teeth. The incisors will appear first followed by canines and premolars. Around four to six months old you’ll notice your pup’s appetite may diminish and you may find tiny rice-sized teeth on the floor. The puppy’s deciduous teeth are falling out and their adult teeth are erupting. The incisors will fall out first followed by premolars and canines. You may notice for a short time that your puppy appears to have double teeth. This happens when the puppy teeth haven’t fallen out, but the adult teeth have pushed through the gum line. By six months old, he should have a mouthful of adult teeth that are sturdier and less sharp than the milk teeth. These new teeth are used to chew, grind food, and tear. They’re also used for defense and attack purposes. If you notice any baby teeth remaining after six months, contact your local veterinarian. How to Cope with Teething Puppies chew to ease the pain of teething. Give your puppy chew toys, cold chews, ice cubes, or frozen chicken and beef broth to help with the discomfort of the teething process. Puppies will seek out anything to chew including wires, shoes, socks, and couches. How to Stop a Puppy from Biting Puppy nipping can be frustrating but it’s normal. When puppies are in a pack they’ll grab, move, and hold littermates with their sharp teeth. During this time, they’re learning bite inhibition. It’s natural. Just because the puppy is removed from his pack doesn’t mean his instinct to nip is quelled. He still must learn bite inhibition.  Puppies naturally bite one another. When they nip too hard, a puppy yelps, snaps at the biter, or stops playing. It is a natural consequence and the puppy that bit realizes he can’t mouth his littermate that hard.  Many puppies come home to their new families between eight to 12 weeks, so the puppy will learn bite inhibition on you instead of his littermates.  Puppies learn to bite softly from trial and error. They may roll around, have rough-and-tumble play, and nip you. It feels like a hard pinch. Teach your puppy bite inhibition by letting him nibble on your arms or fingers. As soon as it hurts make a squeal or high-pitched yip. Then go back to playing with him. It will take a few months but over time even if the puppy’s nip is gentle, continue to react. It will teach him that he needs to reduce the pressure of his bite.  When the puppy nips at you over time, redirect him to play with a toy that he finds stimulating. He may like toys with treats, rubber chew toys, or balls and ropes.  You can also walk away so the puppy knows his bite hurt. This will help reduce the frequency of the biting.  To keep a puppy from continuing to nip, avoid rough play. Don’t let your puppy bite at your hair, skin, or clothes. If he does so, you can put the puppy in time out or walk away so he knows the behavior isn’t okay.  Show Me the Puppies!

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May 11, 2018

Leash Training Made Easy

Leash training your puppy is important for a dog’s safety as well as those around it. Dogs dart across highways, roam around unfenced properties, and chase animals.  Many states have laws stating you’re liable for the damage that occurs when your dog is out of your control. Several states have laws that prohibit dogs from roaming, wandering around at sunset, or allowing a female dog in heat to be off a leash. In these instances, a dog may be seized, impounded, or restrained by law enforcement officers or ordinary citizens. Owners can be fined. Review Michigan State University’s “Table of State Dog Leash Laws” to see how these laws apply to your state.   As a dog owner, you must curb these bad habits before they get out of control. The best way to do this is to begin introducing your puppy to a collar or harness and leash as early as 8 weeks old. Then work on leash training. Pick the Most Appropriate Collar for Your Puppy Be sure to pick a safe and appropriate collar for your puppy. Martingales, pinch collars, and rolled or flat collars are common options. Each needs properly fitted. When you put it on the dog, make sure to reward him. He’ll learn to view the collar as a good thing. Flat Collars Flat collars have a buckle or quick-release plastic clip that holds the collar around the dog’s neck. They’re made of various materials like nylon webbing or leather.  Many owners affix their rabies tags, license tags, and the dog’s ID to the D ring. It is placed over the dog’s head and clipped at the neck. You should be able to fit at least two fingers in between the collar and the puppy’s neck. Pinch and Prong Collars Pinch collars or prong collars are an aversive training tool made of chains with metal prongs inside. It is designed to distribute even pressure and give a quick pinch. These collars are used to correct a dog’s behavior by causing pain or discomfort when the dog’s neck pushes against the prongs. Advocates say it mimics a mother dog’s teeth on a pup’s neck; critics say it’s inhumane and causes unnecessary harm. Martingales Martingales offer more control over your dog than a flat collar but are less aversive than pinch collars. A Martingale fits loosely on a dog’s neck. It has two loops that come together when the dog pulls. Once the dog stops pulling, the Martingale releases. They’re great for dogs that slip other collars and work well on dolichocephalic dogs like Airedale Terriers and Doberman Pinschers.  Choke Chains Choke chains are metal-linked collars with two loops at the end. The collar is placed over the dog’s head to make a shape that looks like the letter P if the dog is walking on the left side. The chain will resemble the number 9 if the dog walks on the right side. The leash is attached to the live ring. When the dog tugs, the chain becomes tighter.  When a choke chain is placed on the dog correctly, the chain will drop loosely again. If it is placed incorrectly, the chain will not release. These collars put pressure on a dog’s spinal column, jugular vein, thyroid, esophagus, trachea, and lymph nodes as well as increase the dog’s eye pressure.  Aversive trainers use this tool to correct the dog’s behavior by giving a quick choke to the dog. It is ill-advised to use choke chains on dogs with small tracheas such as English Bulldogs, Pugs, and Chihuahuas. They may do better with a harness. Collar Alternatives Body harnesses are useful tools that can reduce pulling. They come in various styles including back-clip harnesses, front-clip harnesses, and tightening harnesses. Back Clip Harnesses Back clip harnesses aren’t designed to address behavior issues. They’re not useful in curbing pulling, jumping, or aggression. Rather they’re designed for the dog’s comfort and wrap around the dog’s neck, chest, and under the belly.  Front Clip Harnesses Front clip harnesses attach at the center of the dog’s chest. These are designed to make a dog not pull on a leash as hard. It gives the handler more control. It’s a good choice if getting a dog to walk on a leash is challenging.  Tightening Harnesses Tightening harnesses become more snug and press against a dog’s body when it pulls. These harnesses are easy to put on a dog.  Leash Options You’ll find leashes with various lengths, widths, and styles like standard dog leashes, retractable ones, adjustable leashes, and chains: Chain leashes. Chain leashes are a great option for dogs that tend to chew. Many of these leashes are industrial welded and are durable.  Adjustable leashes. Adjustable leashes allow you to release or shorten straps so that you determine the leash’s length.  Retractable leashes. Retractable leashes allow your dog to walk anywhere from about 4 feet to 30 feet. They automatically extend and retract based on where the dog is walking and will have tension on it all the time.   Standard leashes. Standard dog leashes usually come in Nylon or leather. They’re both durable but dogs have been known to chew through them. Leather leashes will wear down over time and feel comfortable on your hand.  Consider attaching the leash to the dog’s collar and allowing the puppy to walk around the house supervised so he gets used to the weight of the tools. Use Positive Reinforcement for Leash Training Puppies can begin working on leash training between three months and six months. Some people are tempted not to leash train their dogs because the puppy often stays close to the owner. The puppy still needs to be trained and will need to be vaccinated. When you first clip your puppy on the leash, don’t be surprised if the puppy bites it and continues to do so for the first few weeks. To get the puppy to stop nipping, lure it with a treat. The puppy will likely drop the leash to go for the cookie. Start by walking around an open space in your house. Walk a few steps ahead of the dog. When the puppy follows, reward him liberally to motivate him. The goal is to reinforce the behavior you want. If the puppy ignores you, increase your enthusiasm and reward him liberally when he follows you.  Once you are comfortable training inside, take the same idea outside. Start with a training walk. Reward the puppy for paying attention to you while he’s on the leash. Ignore all other behaviors. Walk in different directions; when the dog follows and pays attention, reward him. Lightly tug the leash if the dog ignores you and then reward when the puppy follows.  As your puppy grows, you may notice your puppy is walking ahead of you. Pick up the pace when you’re walking alongside your dog or you can stop when the dog pulls and give a gentle tug and go the other way.  Leash Training Tips Please note that if you have a herding or retrieving dog like a German Shepherd, Border Collie, or Labrador Retriever you may be tempted to think the walk will calm your puppy down. These dogs are often high-energy pets. Consider playing a game of fetch or let your puppy run around before training. They need to burn off energy to focus. Show Me the Puppies!

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May 09, 2018

House Training a Puppy When You Work Full Time

House training a puppy takes positive reinforcement, time, and patience, but this is complicated when you have a full time job. Many working adults are in the office at least 35 hours a week, but an 8-week old puppy should be taken outside every hour. What’s a pet parent to do? First, know you’re in good company. Over half of all U.S. households own a pet. Second, know it will take several months to house train your puppy. Be patient, and start training as soon as you bring your puppy home. Some puppies pick it up as early as four months, whereas others might take a year. Many puppies are trained by the five or six-month mark. Remember, dogs aren’t born knowing where they can go, and some dogs are easier to housebreak than others. Third, puppies have tiny bladders, and their potty habits can be idiosyncratic. It’s important to keep your eye on your puppy and not let it run around the house without watching it.  Confinement Helps House Training  To make housebreaking easier, start crate training as soon as you get your puppy. Put your dog in a safe, enclosed space that is big enough for the pup to turn around and stand up. Remember, a crate isn’t a dog sitter and it’s not for punishment. It’s the puppy's den. Crate training a puppy is great for families who work. Dogs have a denning instinct to keep their sleeping space clean. Plus, crates help your pup learn to hold bowel and bladder muscles. To introduce a puppy to the crate, open it when the dog is in the room. Let him smell it and explore. Don’t force the dog inside. Instead, when he wanders inside, reward him. Encourage your dog to make himself at home in his den by leaving a trail of treats into the kennel. Once comfortable inside, leave the puppy inside for a little bit of time. Hang out with him and give him treats so he makes a positive association between the kennel and the reward. Consider putting the crate next to your bed at night to lower the dog’s nervousness. Later, you can move your dog’s crate to another room. Increase how long the puppy stays inside bit by bit. As a general rule of thumb, our dog can spend one hour in the crate per month of age, but it’s best to avoid having your dog stay confined for more than four or five hours at a time. Leave toys inside the crate so your puppy isn’t bored. Consider hard, rubber toys that allow you to put treats inside like peanut butter or stuffing. By the time the puppy stops munching on the toy, he may fall asleep. Each time you let the dog out of the crate, take him outside and treat him after he goes potty.  Dog Crate Alternatives If you don’t have a crate available, consider putting your dog in the kitchen, bathroom, or laundry room where floors are washable.  Remember to puppy-proof the room. Consider putting childproof latches on doors, raising power cords, and moving items like shampoos, soaps, and cleaning supplies out of reach. Keep the toilet seat down, and move the trashcan.  Playpens, baby gates, and other barriers help so your dog doesn’t have free roam when you’re at work. How to Potty Train a Puppy When You’re Home When you are home, tether the dog to you with a leash and a carabiner attached to your pants so he won’t wander in different rooms unsupervised. Watch your puppy, and notice behaviors that indicate the dog needs to relieve himself. These signs include: Circling Looking around for a place to go Running to the door Sniffing the ground  Squatting If you notice these behaviors, take your puppy outside or to a potty pad immediately. Set a Puppy House Training Schedule Encourage your pup to relieve himself outside:  When he wakes up in the morning  After leaving the crate After a nap After eating and drinking After playing As soon as you arrive home from work Before going to bed  In the middle of the night Your puppy may not relieve himself each time you let him outside. Still, it’s important for your dog to have the opportunity to go. Once your puppy poops or pees, reward him with treats like baby carrots, green beans, apple slices, or small dog biscuits. Then praise. Dogs repeat behaviors that get results. Limit Food Intake to Potty Train a Puppy Fast Don’t free feed. This means you make the food available to your dog all the time. If you free feed, it will be hard to know when the dog needs to urinate or defecate. Instead, feed the puppy twice a day, wait about 10 minutes to see if he’s hungry, and then pick up the bowl if he won’t eat. This will help to control when he needs to relieve himself.  Also, remove the dog’s water bowl two or three hours before bedtime to cut down on nighttime bathroom trips. Feed your puppy high-quality commercial pet food at the same time each day. Dogs often eliminate after meals. Some go immediately after eating, while some may need to relieve themselves 30 minutes after eating. House Training Puppies When You’re at Work When you can’t watch your puppy—like when you’re working—consider asking the following people to help housetrain your puppy: Doggy daycare providers Family members Friends Neighbors Pet sitters You will most likely need their help in the mid-morning and mid-afternoon. Encourage your helpers not to let your puppy be unsupervised, to offer a treat when he relieves himself, and to put the puppy back in the crate after walking. Let them know if you have a space outside where the puppy does his business. Encourage them not to distract the puppy while he’s going potty because pups get distracted fast. If the puppy doesn’t eliminate, he needs to go back to the kennel when he gets inside. Don’t be surprised if you come home and find that the puppy has had an accident. If this happens, don’t scold the puppy. Instead, clean the spot with an odor-eliminating cleaner so your puppy isn't drawn to this spot again. Find a Dog-Friendly Job If you’re unhappy with your current work arrangement, consider a job that blends well with your love for your furry friend. Many companies have pet-friendly offices, allowing employees to bring their dogs with them to work. Finally, the information presented here isn’t intended to replace your veterinarian’s, trainer’s, or behaviorist’s advice. If you have concerns, contact a specialist. If you're looking for the newest addition to your family, browse puppies for sale on Lancaster Puppies today! Show Me the Puppies!

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Apr 06, 2018

Top 11 Kid-Friendly Dog Breeds

Everyone wants safe interactions between dogs and children. If you want a kid-friendly dog, it’s important to look for a breed that is sturdy enough to handle your little ones. Plus, it helps if the dog has a patient and playful demeanor. While it's very important to teach your children how to properly interact with dogs, there are some breeds that may be more kid-friendly than others. Check out our child-friendly breed suggestions below! Beagle If you’re looking for a puppy with a friendly and gentle disposition look no further than a Beagle. These dogs have a sturdy build so they’re ready to play. Their calm and playful temperament means they’re indifferent about kids running around screaming. Overall, these dogs are energetic, joyful, and happiest when they’re someone’s companion. Bichon Frise The Bichon Frise is a gentle and playful dog that gets along well with other pets. Don’t be surprised if you find these sweet and gentle dogs playing and napping with your children as they love giving kisses and they’re always up for cuddles and snuggles. Many Bichons will let your children play dress up with them. Overall, these playful and submissive dogs are great with people and love attention. Boxer Boxers have been known to treat children like siblings and do well in a home with strong leadership. This people-oriented breed is energetic and affectionate and will love the attention your child heaps on it. Although the Boxer looks intimidating, these dogs are steadfast and reliable with everyone. Their goofy personalities will make your family smile. Young boxers are often rambunctious, so they’ll be able to keep up with the kids while they’re playing and can even wear them out. However, Boxers have been known to accidentally bowl over young children while they’re romping. Bulldog Bulldogs not only make fine watchdogs, but they’re also affectionate and kind. They’re much more playful as puppies but mellow out more with age. Bulldogs love people and make excellent companions for children. You’ll be surprised at what the Bulldog will tolerate from a child and when it gets tired of being tormented, the dog will walk away. These dogs are loving and sociable and will thrive in big families because they’re loyal to everyone in their pack. To some, Bulldogs may look intimidating and this may help children feel safe in their own homes because they have a big old meathead on their side. Although they’re great pals, they are slobbery and love to chew which means it’s important to have toys just for the dog, or else the dog might chew on the kid’s toys. Collie Collies are gentle, predictable, and rarely misbehave. These mild-mannered herding dogs have been known to bark if left alone too long. They’d much prefer to be with people than be alone. You’ll find these dogs following children everywhere. These sweet dogs love to be pet and give kisses and you’ll find they’re tolerant of children stroking and cuddling them. They’re tender and have been known to look over goats, chicks, and rabbits as well as children. Golden Retriever These dogs have a friendly, tolerant attitude which means they get along well with just about everyone including strangers, dogs, cats, small animals, and children. This large, athletic dog has a cheerful nature and longs to please. Golden Retrievers have been known to enjoy walking, hiking, biking, and swimming with the family. Labrador Retriever Labs love frolicking and playing, and their high energy can wear children out. These dogs are highly trainable and have a gentle and trustworthy temperament with kids. They can get spirited and knock over children in their excitement. Labs are friendly, outgoing, and can adapt to nearly any situation they encounter. If you’re looking for a companion for outdoor trips with the family along with a dog that will always be by your side, a Labrador may be a great addition.  Newfoundland If you’re looking for a big, loveable teddy bear a Newfoundland is a great choice. These sweet-natured and responsive dogs are kid-friendly and tolerant of their antics. Newfies are known to be naturally gentle and protective of children. They have an easy-going nature and are often relaxed around other pets, small mammals, and cats. These sweet, docile dogs are great at waiting for tummy rubs. Poodle Poodles are good companions for kids because they’re not overly excitable. This affectionate family dog has a goofy streak and loves to play. They don’t shed much so they are good for children with allergies. Young children shouldn’t play with Toy Poodles, however, because a child could hurt a small, delicate dog. Pug Pugs are tolerant lapdogs that thrive on human companionship and get along well with many animals. Pugs have a sweet, childlike, and comical nature and love to follow anyone around who will give them attention. These dogs make great playmates and do best in homes where they get plenty of attention.  Shih Tzu Shih Tzus are affectionate with family and are kid-friendly. These small, adaptable dogs are well suited to apartments and small living environments. Shih Tzus love children, but as with all dogs, should supervised so neither the dog nor the child is accidentally hurt during play. It may be best for children to sit on the floor and play with Shih Tzu puppies, so they’re not dropped. Shih Tzus have docile personalities and thrive on companionship. Ready to bring home a kid-friendly puppy? Find one on Lancaster Puppies today! Show Me the Puppies!

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Mar 06, 2018

10 Ways to Be a Responsible Dog Owner

Make no bones about it: puppies are cute. They also have needle teeth that’ll shred your favorite shoes. They’ll urinate on the dry-clean-only curtains and jump through screen doors to chase a squirrel. Still, they’re one of the most loveable creatures on the planet and there is nothing like coming home to see their wiggly rumps greeting you at the door. They’ll follow you all around the house like you’re the grand marshal of a puppy parade. After all, they’re man’s best friend for a reason. Having a furry best friend in your life comes with responsibilities. These living creatures depend on you for food, water, shelter, and health care. Lancaster Puppies values placing puppies from reputable breeders in loving and responsible homes. That’s why we’ve created 10 tips for you to be a responsible dog parent. 1. Think About Your Lifestyle If you’re someone who rarely comes home, getting a puppy might not be right for you. Dogs are social creatures that thrive on human interaction, and they require lots of time and care. If you’re not around to be the pack leader, getting a puppy isn’t a wise decision. If you have time to devote to a dog, consider your lifestyle. For example, if you're an active individual, consider blending your lifestyle with your dog's by getting an energetic dog breed. Alternatively, if you're more laid back, a low-energy dog may be a better choice for you. 2. Interview Your Breeder When choosing your puppy, make sure to interview your breeder. Ask questions, and ask to see the puppy’s parents. This will help you get a better idea of what your puppy will be like when it matures. Look at the breeder’s premises. Is it clean and free of odors? Do the pups look lively and well-nourished? You’ll be able to assess if a breeder genuinely cares for the animals. Ask about the puppy’s health as well as its parents' health. A good breeder will be knowledgeable about a breed’s genetic diseases as well as offer proof of health screenings. Your breeder also won’t let you bring a puppy home until it’s at least eight weeks old. 3. Pick Your Puppy Once you decide which puppy is best for you and you purchase the dog, make sure to get all the information about the sale in writing. Your contract should have information regarding spaying or neutering, fees, health guarantees, as well as instructions on what to do if you’re unable to keep the puppy. Most breeders would request that the dog be returned to them if you’re unable to keep it. Get these signed documents when you purchase your puppy.  4. Bring Your Puppy Home Get a license for your dog once you bring it home. Get proper dog food, a flat leather or nylon collar, a non-retractable leash, a crate, baby gates, a dog bed, dog waste bags, pet stain and odor remover, food and water bowls, grooming supplies, ID tags, and toys. 5. Decide Who Will Care for Your Puppy and When Your puppy will need daily food, water, and walks. It’s important to create a schedule with your family and stick to it so your puppy will receive proper care. Ask your veterinarian which food is best for your dog based on the puppy’s age, activity level, and size. Your dog will need to be walked every day. Some dogs can get away with a 30-minute walk, while more active breeds need much longer exercise to deplete them of their energy. Aside from walking your dog, you’ll enjoy running around the yard with your puppy and throwing a ball or stick. 6. Make Your Home Safe for Your Puppy Puppies will chew on anything so it’s best to block off areas where your puppy could get into trouble like rooms you don’t want your puppy to go into or spaces where there are loose cords. It’s wise to close toilet lids and make sure your puppy steers clear of houseplants that are hazardous to their health. 7. Contact Your Local Vet Get your puppy checked out by a veterinarian as soon as possible, and ensure that your dog gets vaccinated. Check with your veterinarian to know the best way to prevent heartworm, Lyme disease, fleas, and ticks. Don't forget to get your puppy’s nails trimmed, ears cleaned, and teeth brushed. 8. Give Your Puppy Time to Get Used to the New Environment It will take a little while for your puppy to adjust. The puppy may feel insecure in his new home, and it’ll take several weeks for the puppy to get used to his new surroundings. Start by letting your puppy explore certain areas of the house, like where you’ve placed his crate and food and water bowls. As he becomes more comfortable, you can begin introducing your puppy to other rooms in the house. It's important to note that routine is good for your puppy. You’ll help your new family member adjust by sticking to it. 9. Housetrain Your Dog It will take time to housebreak your dog. You can choose to crate train, litter train, or paper train your dog. However, your puppy will have accidents, so make sure to clean them up with an odor-eliminating cleaner. 10. Love Your Puppy Your puppy won’t understand everything you say, but he’ll enjoy the sound of your voice. Talk to your dog, pet him, and play with him. The first few months of a puppy's life are crucial when it comes to developing a close bond, so maximize this time to the fullest!  In the end, there are many ways to be a responsible dog parent and these 10 tips are a great start on your journey to dog ownership.  Show Me the Puppies!

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Mar 05, 2018

How to Keep Your Dogs Off the Furniture

Some dog owners prefer their dogs to stay off the couch whereas other people buy furniture they know will withstand the wear and tear a dog will inflict with their nails, teeth, and fur. Some people are concerned it will aggravate their allergies; others don’t suffer from them. Some people want to cuddle their dog all the time whereas others don’t want to have to tell their dog to scooch every time they want to sit down. Although there’s no right or wrong answer, if you think animals shouldn’t be on the couch there are a few techniques you can learn to change their behavior. How to Keep Dogs Off the Sofa First, pets enjoy being on the furniture because it makes them feel comfortable and secure. To give your dog the same feeling, create a comfortable space on the floor for your dog to rest. Consider getting a dog its own bed and then rewarding it with treats and toys to reinforce that you want him to stay in his spot. When you see your dog sitting on the floor, reinforce it with a treat. Be genuine and offer sincere praise. You may consider placing their dog bed near furniture where the dog jumps, so he has an alternative space to sit instead of your couch.  This will help you establish boundaries. Dogs are smart, and they will push boundaries if you’re not there to reinforce the behavior you want. Consider making every trip to the living room a mini-training session. Be consistent with your rules. If you don’t want the dog on the furniture don’t let the dog on the bed sometimes and then not others. Establishing firm boundaries will help the dog understand what he’s allowed to do and what he’s not permitted to do.  How to Keep Dogs Off Your Furniture When You're Not Home If you’re not home and you don’t want your dog on the furniture you can lay a thick, plastic sheet over it. This makes the space less comfortable. You can also restrict your dog’s access to certain areas when you’re not home with baby gates and dog crates. Second, it’s important to know you’ll need to reinforce the behavior you want more often in the beginning than once the dog has learned the behavior. It will take time and patience not to let your dog jump on the furniture. It is important to stay consistent and reward your dog for tiny bits of progress. Take advantage of the times the dog is succeeding, even if it’s only a short period of time. Reward good behavior. Third, it takes a lot more work to prevent a dog from jumping on the furniture once he already believes it’s okay to do so. It’s harder to change bad habits than to prevent them from forming in the first place. It’s better to decide as soon as you get the dog if he’s allowed on the furniture or not.  Fourth, it may feel like you’re not getting anywhere when you’re teaching your dog a new behavior. Some breeds are notoriously stubborn and are known to do their own thing. It will require patience, but these dogs can be taught not to get on the furniture, too. Finally, know you can keep your dog on a 6’ non-retractable leash when he’s home with you. This way, when he gets on the couch (or anywhere else he’s not supposed to be) simply say, “off,” show your dog a high-value treat, gently pull the leash, and the dog will move. Then, deliver the treat and praise. This will help your dog understand that “off” means that their four paws belong on the floor, not the chaise. If he gets up again, gently pull him off with the leash or redirect him by luring him with a treat. Tell him to sit on the floor and then reward him for doing so. Keep doing this until your dog gets the message that he isn’t allowed up. Over time your dog will understand that he’s not meant to be on the furniture provided you’re consistent. Each time the dog gets on it you must tell him “off," enforce it, and then redirect the dog to where he’s allowed to sit.  Don't forget to browse Lancaster Puppies to find your newest furry friend! Show Me the Puppies!

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Feb 21, 2018

Clickers: The Secret to Training Dogs Fast

Your puppy’s ability to learn hinges largely on your ability to teach it. Your goal is to teach your pup to offer different responses when you prompt it with a cue. It’s wise to use the same techniques that professional trainers use to help your puppy learn.  Dogs have the amazing ability to learn between 165 to 250 words, which is about the same as a 2-year-old child. It is important to take your time, keep your expectations reasonable, and remove distractions when you’re training your puppy. Use Positive Reinforcement to Shape Your Dog’s Behavior Training should be consistent, short, and part of your dog’s routine. Shoot for 15 minutes a day. It’s wise to use positive reinforcement methods to shape your dog’s behavior. Positive reinforcement means you’ll reward your dog immediately after they do the behavior you want. This reinforces it, so the dog will do the behavior more often. You can begin training your puppy as early as 7 to 8 weeks with basic commands like “sit.”  To teach your puppy basic commands, you’ll need an auditory stimulus to capture the dog’s attention. This gives you the power to communicate what you want the dog to do the moment your dog does it. Use verbal cues or clickers. A verbal cue may be a simple, “good” or “yes.”  Clickers are handheld noisemakers that make a quick, distinct pop sound. There are box clickers and button clickers. Some are loud; others are quiet. Box clickers can be modified with putty, so they make a softer clicking sound.  Many button clickers come with wrist coils, so you can wear them on your arm while training.   Verbal cues and clickers serve as a bridge that tells the animal that it will be rewarded for performing a specific behavior.   Many dog trainers believe it’s best to use a clicker as a bridge, as clicker-trained dogs learn in a shorter amount of time and need less reinforcement than dogs prompted with a verbal cue.  Clicker training tightens communication with your animal. The clicker is the mark that tells the animal the exact behavior you wanted right when your dog does it. The clicker helps dogs improve learning and reduces frustration for both of you.  How to Charge a Bridge Each bridge will need to be charged. This means you’ll need to produce the sound by saying “good” or clicking, then deliver the dog a treat, praise it, or give it a toy. If you’re using a clicker, don’t click it right in the dog’s face, otherwise you can make him nervous. A clicker doesn’t work like a remote control though some new dog owners treat it as such. Don’t frighten your dog by clicking it in his face. You may consider hiding it behind your back, so you’re not tempted to point it at your dog.  In this first step, the dog doesn’t need to do anything to get the reward. The goal is to get the dog to associate the bridge with the treat, toy, or “reward marker” as it’s often called.  You can use tiny bits of food or high-value treats like chicken, roast beef, cheese, peanut butter treats, and dog biscuits as reward markers. You can also use your dog’s favorite toy, though you may not be able to get as many repetitions out of the dog as if you used food. To charge the bridge, say “good,” or click, then hand the dog the reward marker. Do this about 10 times. Don’t reach for the treat before you click. Click then reach for the treat and give it to your dog. Even if you make a mistake, make sure to reward the dog when it hears the sound. This way your dog will associate the sound with a reward. Once the clicker or verbal cue is charged, you can start shaping your dog’s behavior.  Clicker Train Your Dog to Learn Basic Commands Start with the basics like hand targeting. Hold your hand in front of your dog’s nose. When the dog touches your hand with his face, click and then reward. Repeat.  The timing of the click is important. The more accurate you can be with your timing, the more time you’ll save with training because there will be less guesswork on your dog’s part. Each time you click it says to the dog, “Yes, that’s the right behavior.” When the dog doesn’t hear a click, it means the pup will need to try again.  Then, add a verbal cue. For example, try "sit". Click as soon as your dog puts his butt on the ground. This tells the dog that his behavior is on the right track. He’ll make the connection between the action and the reward. Soon the dog will understand that the verbal cue for “sit” means he needs to sit down.  Over time you can eliminate the clicker but it’s a great way to build initial communication with your dog and fast track their learning. Show Me the Puppies!

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Feb 21, 2018

What Are the Benefits of Owning a Gun Dog?

If you’re looking for a gun dog that will love hunting as much as you do, keep reading! Many popular sporting dogs are often used as retrievers, flushing dogs, and pointers and are also devoted and loyal companions to their owners. What Do Gun Dogs Do? Gun dogs are used to retrieve game for hunters. These dogs have a trainable temperament, strong hunting instincts, and often a desire to please their owners. Gun dogs can be trained to make your hunt more effective, so you’ll spend less time finding, retrieving, or flushing game. Plus, with their heightened sense of smell, you can train gun dogs to sniff tracks. Gun dogs are broken down into three types: pointers, flushing dogs, and retrievers. Pointers Pointers can be any breed of dog that points to the game when hunting. Pointers are prized for their sense of smell. When a pointer sniffs out the game, the dog will stand still and point his nose in its direction. This alerts the hunter to the game that is hidden in small patches, grasslands, and fields. English Pointers and English Setters are well-known for their pointing ability. Flushing Dogs Flushing dogs are trained to flush game by finding it and chasing it out of its hiding spot, so a hunter can take a shot. Cocker Spaniels and English Springer Spaniels are great choices. Retrievers A retriever is a type of gun dog that is used to bring back upland game and ducks. Golden Retrievers and Labradors are some of the most popular gun dogs because they have soft mouths, a happy-go-lucky personality, and a dependable nature. How Do You Train a Gun Dog? Regardless of the breed you choose, it’s unwise to see if your dog is gun-shy by taking it outside without any training and bringing it on a hunt. Rather, gun dog training is a gradual process. Consider going to a local dog training facility to teach basic obedience. It may boost your dog’s confidence to let your new gun dog tag along with older, more experienced ones and well-socialized, obedient dogs. If you elect to train your gun dog yourself, consider letting your dog burn off a little energy by running and playing before you begin. Start with basic commands such as sit, come, down, stay, and leave it. To encourage your dog to sit, lift on his chin while pushing on the hindquarters and saying, “sit.” If your dog is disobedient, use that as many times as necessary to get the behavior. Stay persistent, but don’t be aggressive. Encourage your dog not to jump on people. This challenge is easy to solve. When the dog jumps, lift your leg up to block it. Don’t push the dog with your knee. Simply deflect the jump and then say, “no.” Over time, your dog will stop jumping. Then you’ll need to encourage your dog to walk on your left-hand side. To accomplish this, call your dog over to you, and then place the leash over its neck. Excitable dogs may bite the lead or pull it. Remain firm but not aggressive. If your dog bites the lead tell it no in a stern voice but don’t shout as it may frighten your dog. Then, be firm and give a small, light tug on the lead. Don’t yank hard or strangle the dog because it will cause the dog to fear the lead. Instead, walk the dog on the lead. If it pulls slightly to one side or the other side, look at your dog and guide him to the correct side. Talk to your dog. Stay in control. Practice for 15 minutes a day and your dog will improve. It will take repetition and practice. Then move on to basic retrieval. Introduce your gundog to a ball to see if it gets excited. Then roll the ball and encourage your dog to fetch it. Your dog thinks of the ball like a toy and will be excited to run and retrieve it. When your dog retrieves it, bend down, clap your hands, and call the dog’s name to encourage the dog to bring the ball back to you. Then, move on to retrieving a dummy using the same method as the ball. This will require lots of encouragement because your dog has not done it before. Dummies are often used for older and stronger dogs so if you’re encouraging a puppy, know they may struggle to carry it.  Practice the dummy retrieval repeatedly. Hold your dog. Toss the dummy. Wait for it to land. Then let go of your dog. When the dog retrieves it, bend down to the dog’s level, call your dog’s name, clap your hands, and praise the dog when he returns the dummy to you. Shower your dog with praise whenever you’re happy with the behavior. When moving on to introducing a gun dog to firearms, consult a professional if you’re unsure how to do it. You want to expose your puppy to a gun but not be afraid of it. Remember that one of the most important days for your gun dog is when it is being used to gunfire. Consider pairing a younger gun dog with older dogs that have heard gunshots before. The young dog will take cues from the older one. Then, fire the gun. Your older dog won’t show any concern and your younger dog won’t be afraid. The goal is to get the dog used to noise. Once the dog gets used to that sound, consider moving up to louder cracks with primed holes and poppers. Consider firing the shots at 100 yards, and then moving on to closer distances as the sharp crack might put them off. In the end, if you’re looking for a gun dog, Lancaster Puppies has a variety of breeds available. Browse our selection and bring home your gun dog today. Show Me the Puppies!

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Nov 07, 2017

Is a Labrador Retriever Right for You?

According to Time Magazine, the Labrador Retriever is the most popular breed of dog in the country and it’s easy to see why. Labradors are high-spirited pups with an eager-to-please disposition. They’re gentle enough to be a family dog and intelligent enough to be a guide dog or search and rescue dog. How do You Know If a Labrador Retriever is a Good Fit for You? These dogs work well in a variety of lifestyles. If you have children, their loving disposition means your child will have a companion who loves to play. If you enjoy being outside and exercising, a lab is a wonderful friend. They’ll happily spend time playing fetch, running, and frolicking in the yard. If you’re the kind of person who loves swimming, hiking, and running, a Labrador won’t leave your side as you go off on adventures. Why Might Labrador Retrievers Be a Bad Fit for You? That said, these dogs are large. Female Labrador Retrievers stand up to 22 inches tall and males stand up to 24 inches. They’ll weigh 55 to 75 pounds and need room to move. If you live in a tiny apartment it may be a challenge to find space to house your dog along with its bed, kennel and food and water. They also shed a great deal. That’s because Labs have a thick double coat and it has a distinctive smell. They’ll blow their coats twice a year and they’ll shed everywhere. If dog hair doesn’t bother you, then a Labrador Retriever may be right for you. Show Me the Labs!

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Oct 31, 2017

Things to Know Before Adopting A Dog

As any dog owner will tell you, dogs are awesome! They don't judge you if you quit running on the treadmill five minutes before you're supposed to. They don't roll their eyes when you reach for your second donut. They are willing yes-men who make you feel good about yourself. They are loyal, fun-loving, and generally great to have around. However, dogs also come with responsibility. For the sake of both you and your future best friend, you should do some homework on deciding which type of dog to buy. Here are some dog guidelines to think about before purchasing your pooch... 1. You Can't Hit "Pause" on Dog Ownership Your little pooch is awesome, no doubt, but you can't just hit pause and leave your little doggie friend suspended in time until you want to interact with him. You have to make sure you have food on hand, feed him multiple times daily, and keep him healthy with vet checkups. Owning a dog isn't like owning an iPad where you can put it on a shelf when you're not using it. It takes dedication and responsibility. Also, consider who is going to take care of your dog when you travel. Do you have friends or family who can do it? If so, it's important that your pooch learns to know them as well so it's less stressful on Fido when he stays at Aunt Gertrude's house for the week. 2. They Will Chew on Stuff It happens. You bought your new pair of running shoes because you found them irresistible. Fido agrees. He shreds them with his sharp little teeth only to find that when you come you don't share his enthusiasm. Just know that this is part of training and raising a dog. They will make mistakes. They will chew on stuff. Be consistent, fair, and kind in your discipline. 3. They Will Have Accidents And you may step in it. It's happened to everyone who has a dog in their family. Potty training will take work, discipline, and consistency but is entirely possible to do. Just know that mistakes happen and you, most likely, won't be exempt from them during the learning process. 4. Puppies Grow Up We were all cuter when we were younger. Puppies will grow to be dogs. As simple as that seems to understand, a lot of people make impulsive decisions based on the cuteness of the puppy. Cuteness is hard to resist so do research on what type of dog the puppy will grow into before going to look at puppies. This way you know what you're looking for before you have to put down the cute puppy and walk away without it. A cute, adorable Rottweiler puppy that looks like a Teddy Bear will grow into a muscled guard dog who drools a lot. If you live in a tiny apartment, maybe a big, drooling dog isn't what you're looking for. Maybe it is. You should decide what you want before you go look at puppies. Once you're looking a puppy in the eye, it's hard to say no! 5. Different Dogs Do Better with Different Lifestyles Do you go hiking a lot? A dog is a fantastic hiking companion! But if you have a Chihuahua and you are hiking in Denali, Alaska, your Chihuahua is going to become winded and tired. Unless you are carrying your Chihuahua, don't take it hiking in remote mountain ranges. There are 7 different groups of dogs: Herding Dogs: Herding dogs herd things. Breeds such as Border Collies and Australian Shepherds fall under this category. They are very active, medium-sized dogs who are tough and full of energy. They have been bred to have herding tendencies so they may nip at the heels of running children but generally will not hurt them. These dogs require lots of space and exercise but are very intelligent (Border Collies are arguably the most intelligent dog breed) and have lots of stamina. Sporting Dogs: Sporting dogs are used for hunting and other field activities. They are typically very adept at tracking or retrieving. Breeds such as Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, Brittanies, and Pointers are some examples. Highly intelligent & active dogs who need lots of exercise. Non-Sporting Dogs: These are dogs that aren't good for sporting activities. French Bulldogs, for example, would be useless as retrievers in the field but make very good companions full of personality! These dogs can vary quite a bit in personality and size. Hounds: These dogs are known for their tracking ability and stamina. Examples of hound breeds are Beagles, Bassets, and Norwegian Elkhounds. Generally not as high-strung as the Herding group. Terriers: Terriers are dogs that dig into the ground to capture their prey. It is not uncommon for pest control companies to use Jack Russels to extract groundhogs, gophers, or other burrowing animals from the ground. Terriers can be very friendly towards humans but sometimes have little tolerance for other dogs. Very energetic but generally smaller dogs. Irish Terriers, Jack Russell Terriers, and Fox Terriers are some examples of the Terrier group. Toy: Breeds in the Toy group are usually anywhere from 4 - 16 lbs in size. They tend to live longer than bigger dogs and are easier to manage because of their small size. Pugs, Mini Poodles, and Pomeranians are examples of this group. Don't get me wrong! I'm not trying to convince you that you shouldn't buy a dog. I just feel that a lot of people go into the adventure of dog ownership impulsively. We want pups to have great homes and prepare people for the reality that goes with having a sweet little pup. We want everyone, dogs included, to live in happy homes. Your dog will become your best friend and will be a very rewarding responsibility. Find Dogs to Adopt Here!

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Jun 02, 2016

The UP200 & Midnight Run Sled Dog Race

Last year I witnessed the celebratory start of the Iditarod in Anchorage, Alaska and while it was pretty cool, it only whetted my curiosity of the sport that is dog sled racing. Having my interest piqued I was delighted to find, a year later, that there was a legit dog sled race in Michigan just eight hours from where I live. The UP200 is a qualifying race for the "Big One," the legendary 1,150-mile race called the Iditarod. While the UP200 is nowhere close to that long, it's still a bone-chilling 250 miles long and if you can't make it through this one, you ain't getting anywhere near the Iditarod. It takes place in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, an area beloved by its residents and tourists alike. Affectionately known as Yoopers, the people who live in the U.P. remind me a lot of Alaskans; tough and friendly. I was drawn north by the excitement and allure of wilderness and the adventure of dog sled racing. My wife and I, along with some friends, piled into a red Subaru hatchback and started the journey north. The temperature was to reach a high of 4 degrees that day and the 15 mph hour winds stirred the snow into a frenzy, limiting visibility to just a hundred feet or so. Still, it beat being on a dog sled! The biggest thing I enjoy about dog sled races is the atmosphere, and I don't mean the cold weather. Besides the fact that the races are usually held in some of the most beautiful places on earth, the races are a big social party. Everyone bundles up, comes out on the street, and drinks coffee while catching up on the local gossip. Dog sled racing isn't the best spectator sport you will find since the races cover vast expanses of wilderness and budgets are not typically big enough to fund helicopter flyovers but the format does allow a great deal of social interaction. This is how you watch a dog sled race: You pick a spot to watch the teams, generally, it's a checkpoint somewhere so you can keep tabs on who's in first, who is coming in next, etc. The friendly officials, usually made up of volunteers, are more than willing to let you in on what is happening. Then, you watch the teams come in, cheering them on. If it's going to be a while until the next team will arrive, no problem! You hang around the fires while drinking coffee and learning to know the other spectators. Plus, most races will have GPS trackers on the sleds so you can log in to an app and keep tabs on the teams' progress yourself. The UP200 started at Marquette and then winded its way to Grand Marais where the teams would do a 180 and come back again, completing the 250-mile race. We had decided to post ourselves at the Grand Marais checkpoint since it was the main checkpoint. The teams were required to rest and to get their dogs checked by race vets. This was a great opportunity to wander around and get a look at the dogs close up. The community center in Grand Marais was opened up and hot soup and coffee were made available, as well as other dog sled-themed merchandise. After commenting on how deep the snow was - like the greenhorns that we were - the locals quickly informed us that this actually was the least amount of snow they had been "blessed" with for the last 90 years or so. Typically by Christmas time the snow will be piled the whole way up to the tops of the first floor windows. The Upper Peninsula is not for the faint of heart or the cold-blooded. If you witness the start of the race you will find that the dogs are infectiously happy and make quite a racket as they churn the snow, barely waiting for the command to "mush!" They can never wait to get started. The dogs thoroughly enjoy themselves and can't start pulling soon enough! Once the teams are in rhythm they become more quiet and barely make a sound as they skim along. I've been told that riding a dog sled is unlike anything else you will ever experience. They say it's like you're a ghost speeding through the woods with barely a sound. I'm definitely going to try it someday! If you choose to watch the dogs come in after the race, they are typically much more tired and quiet, worn out after the long race. I recommend you watch the dogs leave and then drive to the checkpoint (since you can easily beat them there) and watch them come in, if possible. After spending half a day in single-digit weather (much colder with the wind chill) and imagining myself to be a musher someday in the future, I was tempted to buy a wolverine skin which the locals claim doesn't freeze up from breath like other skins do. After seeing a nice wolverine pelt for sale at a gas station for $750 (only in the U.P. do they sell wolverine skins in gas stations) I decided I would rather get frostbite. For more information on the UP200 visit UP200.org.  Here are the standings for the 2016 UP200Place Bib # Name Finish Time Dogs on the Ground Dogs in Basket 1 13 Ryan Anderson 02/14/2016 11:10:32 10 0 2 5 Martin Massicote 02/14/2016 11:14:3711 0 3 7 Denis Tremblay 02/14/2016 12:06:14 9 0 4 3 Ed Stielstra 02/14/2016 12:08:10 10 1 5 8 Ward Wallin 02/14/2016 13:06:06 11 0 6 2 Bruce Langmaid02/14/2016 13:13:37 8 1 7 12 Shawn McCarty 02/14/2016 13:22:23 11 0 8 14 Sally Manikian 02/14/2016 14:49:15 9 0 9 1 Andre Longchamps 02/14/2016 15:02:38 80 10 4 Normand Casavant 02/14/2016 15:07:44 6 2 11 6 Jen Peeks 02/14/2016 17:13:38 10 1 12 9 Blair Braverman Scratched     13 10 Leanne Bergen Scratched    14 15 Lisa Dietzen Scratched

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Feb 24, 2016

The Dogs of the Iditarod

When you think of Alaska you think of bush planes, grizzly bears, snow, igloos, and a blue-eyed Husky standing alert in front of a sled staring at majestic white-capped mountains in the distance. I don't claim to be an expert on the Iditarod or the dogs used in the legendary, grueling race that is nearly a religion in Alaska, but I did have the privilege of seeing some parts of the race last year. It is a boatload of fun and I would recommend that you witness a sled dog race at one point in your life. When the harnesses come out, the dogs go ballistic with excitement. It's something to see! The mushers (the drivers of the dog sleds) say that when they stop, they usually have to tie the sled to a tree because the dogs don't like stopping and will take off without warning. The dogs love running. It's in their blood. Also, the dogs are treated like royalty. The dogs are the athletes of the race, as any musher will tell you. The musher will spend every day training with the dogs and very much sees the dogs as family. A good musher will revere their dogs and attend to their every need. Here's something interesting: Did you know that the sled dogs of the Iditarod aren't typically purebred Huskies? In fact, they usually aren't even purebred or registered. Mushers will develop their own strains of dogs, usually mixed with hounds or Huskies, and race them. They will breed the top performing dogs, pick the choice of the litter for themselves, and sell the others. After many years, the musher will have his own brand of “mutts” that are bred to excel at dog sledding. For this reason, the sled dogs aren't typically registered although a champion sled dog can sell for thousands of dollars. The value of a sled dog comes from the success of the musher who raised it, from the previous Iditarod champions in their bloodlines, or from the races the dog itself has won. If you ever have the chance, hop on a plane and fly to the frigid north. The dog sled races are a great event where the sponsors hand out free food, the spectators cheer on their favorite dog teams, and the millionaires and the commoners meet merely to have a good time. Alaska has a culture all its own and the dog sled race is a huge part of it. As Alaskans like to say with pride; Alaska is just north of normal. See Huskies For Sale

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Jan 20, 2016

4 Things to Consider Before Buying Your Perfect Pooch

Here are a few important things to take into consideration before buying your new furry friend! The Dog's Coat This is important because it should affect your decisions on what dog to buy. If the dog is going to be living inside, it's likely you want a non-shedding dog that doesn't leave hair hanging on every fuzzy surface inside your home. If you can't stand any dog hair whatsoever, buy a puppy with a non-shedding coat. The most common breeds of non-shedding dogs are Shih Tzus, Bichon Frise, Yorkshire Terrier, Maltese, Lhasa Apso, Havanese, and so on. Any mixes including these breeds will tend to be low shedding or non-shedding, it all depends on what they are mixed with. For example: Yorkiepoos (or Yorkshire Terrier and Poodle mix) will not shed because both parents are non-shedding. If one of the parents is shedding, the offspring will have a combination of some traits from both parents so it's possible they won't shed but it's likely they will a little bit. Be aware that if the dog doesn't shed, however, the coat will require more maintenance such as clipping and combing. Many people choose dog breeds that do shed but merely comb them on a daily basis outside so the hair shed inside is limited. If you want the dog as an outside farm dog or as an adventure companion, a shedding dog might be actually what you want since the coat is lower maintenance. Dogs with longer hair (like Golden Retrievers) will do better in cold climates but the hair will get tangled and matted quicker. Although shedding helps this problem, it's still something to consider. Also, when the weather warms up, the dog will respond by shedding profusely. Shorter hair lengths will do well in hotter climates and won't get tangled, matted, or as heavy when it's wet. Dogs like the Australian Cattle Dog have short, dense fur that is water resistant and very low maintenance.  Labrador Retrievers are also very popular dogs with shorter, thick fur that excel in outdoor environments. The Dog's Energy Level You can't judge a dog by its breed but it gives you a good guideline to go by. Look up the dogs you are interested in and see how active they are. Look at the dog's origins. Was the breed developed as a hunting dog? If so, it's likely high energy. Is it a herding dog? Then it's going to like running and will have herding instincts such as nipping at the heels of running things. Do your research so you don't have a super high-energy dog stuck inside your city apartment all day. That's not a good combination for your dog or your apartment (since bored, high-energy dogs are quite destructive). The Dog's Size Obviously the bigger a dog, the more room you need for it to be comfortable. If you have a small apartment, you may want to consider something other than a Great Dane or an English Mastiff. If you have a 2,000-acre ranch, a Toy Poodle will not do well beside your tractor putting up fence rows or herding cows in the morning. Do you want the dog for personal protection? A Chihuahua is not an effective guard dog although any dog can let you know when a stranger is lurking around. But if you want an intimidating dog as a way of protecting yourself while jogging, for example, a bigger dog is much more effective. Breeds like Rottweilers, Dobermans, and German Shepherds may be what you are looking for. Guard dogs have a reputation for being mean but if you make it a point to socialize your intimidating dog as a puppy, guard dogs can be extremely friendly and nice to have around while having the instincts to realize when someone isn't welcome. The Dog's Personality Dog breeds have personalities. Do you have kids? Then you need a puppy that will put up with your little ones trying to ride it like a horse around the backyard. Any dog, if raised with lots of love and attention from children, will probably get along with the children it knows. Breeds like Mini Eskimos can be a bit standoff-ish with new people. Breeds like Golden Retrievers and Labs have a reputation for doing well with children and are some of the best-selling breeds in America. Show Me the Puppies!

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Jan 11, 2016

Standard Poodles - A Breed to Consider (If You are Smart Enough)

Standard Poodles are non-shedding, large-sized dogs with above-average intelligence. Since most people don't enjoy having pets that are smarter than they are, the Poodle breed usually enjoys smart owners. Indeed, Poodle owners think they are smarter than everyone else, sometimes only because they own a Poodle. If you hang around a Standard Poodle long enough, you will get the impression that it's holding you to a high standard and is disappointed if you don't meet those standards. Maybe that's why Poodle owners seem haughty, they are constantly being groomed in manners and professional etiquette by their dogs. Breed Characteristics Putting humorous stereotypes aside, Standard Poodles are very intelligent, easy-to-train dogs that do well with people with allergies. They are an active sporting class of dogs, however, and so they should be exercised regularly, especially since they have such a keen intellect and will be prone to mischief if bored (the American Kennel Club rates the Standard Poodle as a “Medium” active breed). In fact, Standard Poodles must be disciplined with consistency (not inhumanely) and with authority or your Poodle will begin to assume you are not worth listening to. The average weight of a Standard Poodle is 45-70 pounds with males being generally heavier than females. The coats, while non-shedding and great for people with allergies, do require lots of grooming and regular clipping. The coat should not be neglected or it gets matted and is very uncomfortable for the dog and quite ugly to look at. The colors of Standard Poodles can vary like most purebred dogs. There are ten acceptable colors – such as Cream, Black, White, Brown, Red, Silver, and more - recognized by AKC although Parti, or multi-colored, Standard Poodles are becoming very desired among Poodle enthusiasts. Standard Poodle History The history of the Standard Poodle is interesting, considering the pompous reputation it has achieved in modern times. Although the Poodle is thought to have originated in Germany it was later used in France as a water retriever and was used extensively in duck hunting. It was prized for its keen intelligence (which we've already covered), curly and moisture-resistant coat, and webbed feet which adapted it to damp conditions very well. The tradition of its exaggerated, puffy hairstyles began in the Victorian era when women wanted their Poodles to compliment their own wardrobe and hairstyles. Regardless of your income, you will find the Poodle to be a bright, intelligent, eager, and happy pet although it is good to know the needs of the breed so the Poodle can be as happy as its owner! See Standard Poodle Puppies For Sale

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Jan 04, 2016

Things to Remember While Celebrating the Holidays With Your Dog

The holiday season is a joyful time for everyone, including dogs! Be sure to keep the following things in mind when celebrating the holidays with your pooch. Beware of Bones Chicken and turkey bones can be bad for the cutest member of your family! Cooked bones can splinter and damage your dog's throat or intestines. Raw bones can contain harmful bacteria that can cause diarrhea. This can cause a lot of holiday stress for both you and your dog. No one likes stepping on Fido's little Christmas “presents” on the morning after Christmas. However, bones aren't all bad. They give Fido something to do so he won't chew on the shiny new toys left around the house and they help his dental health. What to do? Rawhide bones are a great option! They will give your dog a healthy hobby and increase the holiday enjoyment of your entire family. Stay Alert Robbery is at an all-time high during the holidays. Rows of picturesque houses all stuffed with brand new toys are a robber's dream. Fido has more sensitive ears than you do so use your dog as an alarm. If your little best friend is going crazy barking out the back window, go investigate. If there is a man with a sack over his shoulder and a ski mask laughing hysterically at your barking Chihuahua, think about adding a Rottweiler to your family for next Christmas. Obviously, if the robber is more than your Chihuahua can handle, call the police. Notice Your Dog's Attitude Around Strangers No one likes having their ankles chewed up into mincemeat pie. Be aware of your dog's attitude towards strangers. Your dog loves you and everyone he knows but he doesn't like strangers. You might know your great aunt Bertha but Fido doesn't and he sees it as his mission to eliminate the threat. It's rude to have a snapping, barking dog lurking around every corner and it puts stress on extended family and friends that might already be feeling a bit on edge. Then again, if your dog chases them off, it might prevent any awkward political discussions. How you deal with in-laws is up to you but be aware that other people do not necessarily love your dog as much as you do. Likewise, your dog doesn't love your great Aunt Bertha as much as you do. Give Fido a new rawhide bone as a consolation prize and lock him in the bathroom with his doggy bed. He will survive. We hope that helps you have a Merry Christmas! If you're looking to add a puppy to your family this holiday season, find one on Lancaster Puppies today! Show Me the Puppies!

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Dec 22, 2015